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21

It is talc, and it is used in the tube making process to prevent the inner tube rubber from sticking to itself.


10

It should be straight out, perpendicular to the rim. Otherwise you risk damaging the tube. When the valve stem is at an angle the valve isn't free in the hole – it is trapped by the edges of the hole where they bind the stem. The edges of the hole may cut the stem which will be moving a little bit as the tire and tube flex over bumps and the like. There ...


9

That will be fine. 38 is the measure of your tyre width. Most inner tubes can be used in a range of tyre widths eg 38-43 (it should say on the box) They all seem a bit big and flappy until the tyre is on and it's pumped up. Be careful not to pinch any of your inner tube between the edge of the rim and the bead of the tyre.


8

Yes, inner tubes do that. They are like balloons, except that the butyl rubber they are made of doesn't stretch like natural latex rubber. You are not supposed to inflate tubes outside a tire. Tires have fabric casing to withstand the pressure.


7

Yes. Slime makes some valve extenders for Schrader valves , and if you have a Presta valve you can use a Presta to Schrader valve adapter (and if you really want, you can attach a Schrader valve extender to that, since you can buy the Schrader valve extenders at Walmart or whatever) . Some companies (like Topeak) make Presta valve extenders as well: ...


6

What kind of valve do you have? If you have Presta valves then you need to unscrew that little knobbie thing on top until the knobbie is all the way unscrewed against the bump on the end of the shaft it rides on. With either Presta or Schrader you can have a problem with the pump if you do not press the pump chuck all the way onto the valve. Especially ...


6

Tubes expand quite a lot as they are inflated - Try pumping one up on its own and see how quickly if expands (don't over do it unless you never want to use the tube again.). The way tubes and tires work, the tube holds the air in, the tire prevents the tube expanding. The 1.5-2.2 means the tube is suitable for a tire 1.5 up to 2.2 and is ideal for you 2.1 ...


5

You could always buy some new tubes with the valve set at a 45 degree angle. Schwalbe sell them for £5/6 depending on the size you need. Easiest way I'd say and saves you faffing about drilling holes or screwing valve extenders on and off.


5

Self-sealing tubes are filled (well, not completely filled) with a sealant, similar to this used to seal tubeless tyres. When a wheel is spinning, sealant is distributed evenly around the tube, and when the puncture occurs, the sealant should be able to stop the air from leaking. They are quite reliable for small punctures (say, up to 5mmm at a time) but the ...


5

Yes, they do degrade over time. Unfortunately, various brands and different storage conditions yield different results, so I'm not able to give an estimation of how long can you safely store a tube. How ever, I can recommend the conditions that appeared to give best results. The tubes I could use after long time of storage without problems where those that ...


4

A tube can usually fit a range of different tire sizes, because the tube can stretch a bit when it is being inflated. The range of tire sizes is written on the package that you see at the store. Since your tire is 26"x1.5", you need to find a tube that is labelled as being appropriate for a 26" (diameter) tire and a width range that includes 1.5". For ...


4

Liquid Nitrogen boils at -196 Degrees Celsius (321 degrees Fahrenheit) and is cold enough that rubber will become brittle. Its probably not a good idea as I am fairly sure the the brittle rubber tube will not hold the pressure created as the liquid Nitrogen boils. View before you do it. and if you decide to go ahead, ring the emergency room before hand ...


4

If your tyre says 700x28c, that means your wheel has 700c of diameter and your tyre is size 28. You should buy a tube that perfectly fits this, and this is very easy as because tubes have, in the box, the diameter of the wheel they were made for, in your case 700c, and the range of the tires they are made for. So if the tube says 24-26 that is ok for you, if ...


4

I typed this whole answer and then decided to cut to the chase, which I doing here. IF you do not have a tiny splinter hidden in the tire I think you are pinching the tube between the tire and the rim during installation. This explains the flats at 50-60 lbs. Losing weight is not the problem. It might be part of the problem - that is to say that someone who ...


4

I agree with your diagnosis: it must be related to the rim tape. Take it off and inspect it and the rim below. If you don't find anything obvious, buy new, good quality rim tapes, check there are no sharp edges, and reinstall.


4

I would say, you just didn't put the tire on well. When you inflate the tire to half its recommended pressure you should check that the tire seats well for the whole diameter around the rim on both sides. If it came out even a little, push it back in (may require some deflating). Otherwise the pressure may push the tire out like you had, and then the tube ...


3

A bang explode pretty much only happens when the tube leaks out from tire. Either the slit is big enough for the tube to push through or the tire pushed over the rim and the tube leaks out. Without a tire a tube will only handle a few pounds of pressure. I suspect the tire belt is damaged. When you see the tire off the rim you might assume the ...


3

Ideal Gas equation: pV=nRT With +15oC and -20oC the pressure ratio between the two is: p1/p2 = (273+15)/(273-20). Or 13% higher pressure when put in the garage. However that is assuming you are pumping it to maximum pressure, that the tyre can no longer (or very slightly) expand, making V (volume) constant. That is the basics for your assumption. ...


3

Well, I hoped someone with more recent experience would chime in. It's been 20 years since I used tubulars, but here's what I remember. While the glue is important, the inflation of the tire will hold the tire to the rim. The glue is largely there to prevent the tire rolling when you're cornering hard and to keep the tire on the rim if you get a flat/slow ...


3

Yes, absolutely. Spend an extra 20 dollars on good tires and you could save yourself 30 dollars worth of tubes. Plan on spending somewhere around 40 to 50 dollars a tire. Even if tubes were free, the money is worth saving the hours spent on the side of the road dealing with flats. Look for tires in the 'training' or 'commuting' category, for extra puncture ...


3

Its extremely unlikely for an inner tube to just burst. It sounds like you are suffering from punctures. There are two types of puncture; the first is an object penetrating the tire and inner tube, and the second is a 'pinch' puncture where an impact causes the inner tube to be pinched between the tire and rim. Many bikes (even expensive ones) come with ...


3

As I've said in other answers, the right tire pressure function of you and your bike and your terrain. You'll have to play with the tire pressure to balance the ride quality.Just because the tire says pressure x on the sidewall doesn't mean it makes any sense running the tire at that pressure since it might just give a bouncy ride which compromises your ...


3

I found it! After careful inspection of the tire I found a small piece of glass stuck into it: It's sharp side was facing the tube. Here is the place where it was stuck: On the internal side of the tire you can see a little hole: It was hard to feel this little thing by hand. But when I pumped the tire and rode, creating high pressure, this sharp ...


3

Firstly, you are one impressively persistent woman! Yes, of course weight is a factor. You just need equipment that will deal with it. In addition to the points made by jqning, I'm thinking that several things can help you Larger and better tires would help. I checked out the Electra website, but couldn't be sure which bike you have. Some do have bigger ...


2

Yes, better tires can help prevent punctures. It has already been mentioned that there are tires specifically made to enhance puncture resistance. One thing that has not been mentioned is that better tires also have stronger sidewalls to offer more tire support when going over bumps and thus better protect against pinch flats. (Once, I had a cheap tire with ...


2

Use those two items - retaining screw and cap. On the valve there are actually two sets of threads One to open and close Two to remove the core If you unscrew to far / hard the core comes out. You probable loosened the core and then it blew out. Some sets of tubes just don't have the core very tight. Get a tool to remove the core - it is also ...


2

I also use a Joe Blow on my prestas. After I had a couple valve stems bend and/or break, I started making sure I only unscrew the stem a little bit. My theory was that by unscrewing the stem all the way up, it was easier to bend or break when pulling the pump head off. Haven't had it happen again since.


2

Yes the tube size should match the tire size. But a smaller tube will stretch. Too big a tube may fold. Max means max. If the the tire says 85 psi max then that is the max. If you weigh 180 then run the tire at or near the maximum. Do not put 116 PSI in that tire. Even if you have the wrong size tube pressure is still based on tire (not tube).


2

The right answer to this (as with all tire pressure questions) is try it out as the sidewall ratings (and anyone else who gives you an answer with a number in it) is likely giving you nonsense. In fact, you should not be near the max sidewall rating in winter (or in summer) in most cases and thus this is not something you should be worrying about if your ...


2

What that looks like to me is that you had the tube pinched (folded) up along side the value stem. That would explain both the cut and the bulges. That cut looks like a tear - a faulty tube would have more of a clean split. When you mount tire make sure the valve is free (you can push it in).



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