Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

It is talc, and it is used in the tube making process to prevent the inner tube rubber from sticking to itself.


9

That will be fine. 38 is the measure of your tyre width. Most inner tubes can be used in a range of tyre widths eg 38-43 (it should say on the box) They all seem a bit big and flappy until the tyre is on and it's pumped up. Be careful not to pinch any of your inner tube between the edge of the rim and the bead of the tyre.


7

Yes. Slime makes some valve extenders for Schrader valves , and if you have a Presta valve you can use a Presta to Schrader valve adapter (and if you really want, you can attach a Schrader valve extender to that, since you can buy the Schrader valve extenders at Walmart or whatever) . Some companies (like Topeak) make Presta valve extenders as well: ...


6

I do like you do when riding, and I usually save up my tubes with holes and patch a bunch of them all at once. That way I can use a tub of water to both find the holes, and can go back through them after patching and test to see if they are holding air. If I have any doubt after patching a tube, I give it a little time to cure and then I pump it up and hang ...


6

Pro's: May be a quick roadside fix. May be able to fix without removing tyre. May last a long time. May offer protection against a second puncture in the same wheel. Con's: Expensive for a puncture. Bulky and heavy. Only one can per tyre. Wouldn't be suitable for some punctures and would be a waste if you didn't realise this. This fix may work for ...


6

Air will escape, one of the biggest problems with Ghetto tubeless (unfortunate, but long established name for this technique) and not using specific tubeless ready or UST (tubeless standard) tires is that you need to inflate your tires a lot. At worst for every ride. The tires often do roll off the rim. Not every combination of Ghetto tubeless will work ...


5

You could always buy some new tubes with the valve set at a 45 degree angle. Schwalbe sell them for £5/6 depending on the size you need. Easiest way I'd say and saves you faffing about drilling holes or screwing valve extenders on and off.


5

Self-sealing tubes are filled (well, not completely filled) with a sealant, similar to this used to seal tubeless tyres. When a wheel is spinning, sealant is distributed evenly around the tube, and when the puncture occurs, the sealant should be able to stop the air from leaking. They are quite reliable for small punctures (say, up to 5mmm at a time) but the ...


4

Those tires should work just fine. Any of the MTB slick tires listed on that site would work well with your bike and current rims. You can get too small a tire on too wide a rim, but it takes a much bigger jump than from 2" to 1.5 or so. There is a very conservative guide on Sheldon Brown's bike pages. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html Given your ...


4

44c versus 45c is not enough to worry about. You can use it. Not that you would need to do this but after you have stretched it you should not try and put it in a 35c as it would be hard to do so without a fold in the tube.


4

A tube can usually fit a range of different tire sizes, because the tube can stretch a bit when it is being inflated. The range of tire sizes is written on the package that you see at the store. Since your tire is 26"x1.5", you need to find a tube that is labelled as being appropriate for a 26" (diameter) tire and a width range that includes 1.5". For ...


4

Liquid Nitrogen boils at -196 Degrees Celsius (321 degrees Fahrenheit) and is cold enough that rubber will become brittle. Its probably not a good idea as I am fairly sure the the brittle rubber tube will not hold the pressure created as the liquid Nitrogen boils. View before you do it. and if you decide to go ahead, ring the emergency room before hand ...


3

Ideal Gas equation: pV=nRT With +15oC and -20oC the pressure ratio between the two is: p1/p2 = (273+15)/(273-20). Or 13% higher pressure when put in the garage. However that is assuming you are pumping it to maximum pressure, that the tyre can no longer (or very slightly) expand, making V (volume) constant. That is the basics for your assumption. ...


3

Yes, absolutely. Spend an extra 20 dollars on good tires and you could save yourself 30 dollars worth of tubes. Plan on spending somewhere around 40 to 50 dollars a tire. Even if tubes were free, the money is worth saving the hours spent on the side of the road dealing with flats. Look for tires in the 'training' or 'commuting' category, for extra puncture ...


3

Its extremely unlikely for an inner tube to just burst. It sounds like you are suffering from punctures. There are two types of puncture; the first is an object penetrating the tire and inner tube, and the second is a 'pinch' puncture where an impact causes the inner tube to be pinched between the tire and rim. Many bikes (even expensive ones) come with ...


3

As I've said in other answers, the right tire pressure function of you and your bike and your terrain. You'll have to play with the tire pressure to balance the ride quality.Just because the tire says pressure x on the sidewall doesn't mean it makes any sense running the tire at that pressure since it might just give a bouncy ride which compromises your ...


3

Well, I hoped someone with more recent experience would chime in. It's been 20 years since I used tubulars, but here's what I remember. While the glue is important, the inflation of the tire will hold the tire to the rim. The glue is largely there to prevent the tire rolling when you're cornering hard and to keep the tire on the rim if you get a flat/slow ...


3

Slime is lighter and conveniently pre-applied in the convenience of you own own home/garage. Slime tube sealant As for can the tube be repaired? The PedalPower can says temporary but not exactly sure what that means. As for Sime if it seals a small puncture I just stay with Slime only. If it is a larger puncture it might be too big to repair period. I ...


3

A bang explode pretty much only happens when the tube leaks out from tire. Either the slit is big enough for the tube to push through or the tire pushed over the rim and the tube leaks out. Without a tire a tube will only handle a few pounds of pressure. I suspect the tire belt is damaged. When you see the tire off the rim you might assume the ...


2

I followed the advice of leaving the plastic film on. After a few days the tire went flat again. Inspection revealed that the tube was puckered around the patch because the plastic film does not stretch in the same way as the tube and the patch. The new leak was coming from under the patch. Therefore from now on I am going to try to take the plastic off.


2

Like many comments, it sounds like it's at least partially related to a change in tire pressure. There's also the external change in tire tread that could contribute to the sound change. If you listen to a large knob tire on a road versus a small knob one, they sound totally different. Your tread might be starting to wear, thus giving a different sound. The ...


2

The protective layer is known as "rim tape". The old tube shouldn't remain within the tire - the only thing inside the rim should be the rim tape and the new tube. You may have different tire pressures than before - have you tried playing with them?


2

How much air did you lose? What types of tires/tubes/rim strips? What tire pressure did you start your ride with? A few possibilities: 1) Did you replace the rim strip/tape in each rim when you replaced the tubes and tires? 2) You may have made a small hole in the tube when installing either by improperly using a tool to reseat the tire or by catching ...


2

You have the right idea. Inflate the tube to roughly the side it is in the tyre, which will be a much lower pressure than it would be if it was in a tyre. My floor pump doesn't register the pressure of a tube pumped up like this, so I expect it's less than 10psi/1 bar.


2

A propperly applied patch should resist inflating the tube up to 1.5-2 times the nominal diameter. This is useful for testing the quality of the patching work but also to find the tiniest holes that sometimes are harder to spot. As other say, the definitive way to test is to inflate and submerge in water or to inflate and let overnight to see if it holds. ...


2

You should inflate the tube to 1.5 to 2 times the "normal" diameter, in order to develop a modicum of pressure. (Wait until after the patch has "cured" overnight to do this, however.) Then either test in a tub/sink or let it sit overnight again to see if it loses air. (Getting the tube to fold up nicely is not a problem, if it's a Presta. Just squeegee ...


2

Yes, better tires can help prevent punctures. It has already been mentioned that there are tires specifically made to enhance puncture resistance. One thing that has not been mentioned is that better tires also have stronger sidewalls to offer more tire support when going over bumps and thus better protect against pinch flats. (Once, I had a cheap tire with ...


2

Use those two items - retaining screw and cap. On the valve there are actually two sets of threads One to open and close Two to remove the core If you unscrew to far / hard the core comes out. You probable loosened the core and then it blew out. Some sets of tubes just don't have the core very tight. Get a tool to remove the core - it is also ...


2

I also use a Joe Blow on my prestas. After I had a couple valve stems bend and/or break, I started making sure I only unscrew the stem a little bit. My theory was that by unscrewing the stem all the way up, it was easier to bend or break when pulling the pump head off. Haven't had it happen again since.


2

Yes the tube size should match the tire size. But a smaller tube will stretch. Too big a tube may fold. Max means max. If the the tire says 85 psi max then that is the max. If you weigh 180 then run the tire at or near the maximum. Do not put 116 PSI in that tire. Even if you have the wrong size tube pressure is still based on tire (not tube).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible