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45

I happened to do just that. I took an old hand pump and an inner tube to the bath tub. Submerged the pump and pre-filled the tube with water, complete with burping out any air bubbles. With the tube moderately full and free from air, I put it on the rim with the tire. Then the final pressure up. The first thing to notice is that the pump operates with ...


7

Can I calculate (approximately) how much air pressure is lost by measuring the hose length and diameter? No, you cannot tell how much pressure is lost based on the size of the hose. This is not because there is not enough information to tell but because the hose is irrelevant. You seem to be under the impression that there is some total amount of ...


7

Yes. Slime makes some valve extenders for Schrader valves , and if you have a Presta valve you can use a Presta to Schrader valve adapter (and if you really want, you can attach a Schrader valve extender to that, since you can buy the Schrader valve extenders at Walmart or whatever) . Some companies (like Topeak) make Presta valve extenders as well: ...


6

I do like you do when riding, and I usually save up my tubes with holes and patch a bunch of them all at once. That way I can use a tub of water to both find the holes, and can go back through them after patching and test to see if they are holding air. If I have any doubt after patching a tube, I give it a little time to cure and then I pump it up and hang ...


6

Pro's: May be a quick roadside fix. May be able to fix without removing tyre. May last a long time. May offer protection against a second puncture in the same wheel. Con's: Expensive for a puncture. Bulky and heavy. Only one can per tyre. Wouldn't be suitable for some punctures and would be a waste if you didn't realise this. This fix may work for ...


6

I've found that the amount of time I let the glue dry makes the biggest difference. It really needs to get from "wet" to "tacky" to work best. Scraping the tube and the glue brand make a bit of difference too. If the patch seems relatively well stuck, but comes up when you try to take the backing off, just leave the backing on; it won't hurt anything.


6

It goes outside the rim, where you can see it. It's not even strictly necessary. It really only exists to keep the valve stem in place while you air the tire up, which makes the whole process much easier. Weight weenies throw them away to save a couple grams. Also note that if you use it, you don't want to screw it down too tight. Doing so can crimp your ...


6

Air will escape, one of the biggest problems with Ghetto tubeless (unfortunate, but long established name for this technique) and not using specific tubeless ready or UST (tubeless standard) tires is that you need to inflate your tires a lot. At worst for every ride. The tires often do roll off the rim. Not every combination of Ghetto tubeless will work ...


5

Since the actual tire has burst, I think the most likely cause is that over the course of the 4000km you have ridden, the tire has suffered a cut or other damage that you did not previously notice. While sitting in your room, the pressure of the tube has gradually stretched the damaged area, and then burst. Inspect the other tire to check for cuts or ...


5

The manufacturer sells said "vulcanizing solution" in quantities of 25g tubes through 1 gallon cans, so you should be able to buy it in larger quantities. Indeed, a quick search of Amazon yield 8 oz cans (or slightly cheaper), and while I couldn't find it on something well known like Amazon there are other places that sell the 1 gallon quantity. However, as ...


5

You could always buy some new tubes with the valve set at a 45 degree angle. Schwalbe sell them for £5/6 depending on the size you need. Easiest way I'd say and saves you faffing about drilling holes or screwing valve extenders on and off.


4

Everything you could want to know about tire sizing is here, including recommendations of how wide a tire should go on how wide a rim. In your case, you will look for tires made for 26" rims (ISO 559), but generally, narrow rims should have narrower tires than wider rims. These tires will be marked 26 x decimal number (by decimal number, i mean a number ...


4

Those tires should work just fine. Any of the MTB slick tires listed on that site would work well with your bike and current rims. You can get too small a tire on too wide a rim, but it takes a much bigger jump than from 2" to 1.5 or so. There is a very conservative guide on Sheldon Brown's bike pages. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html Given your ...


4

You may have a sort of systematic effect, such as debris (puncture causing material) near the patch site, or missing rim tape or something depending on where the patch is. It may not be easy to find the causing material unless the tire is flexed under load though, which is why you might just not see it. Either that, or you're consistently not applying the ...


4

44c versus 45c is not enough to worry about. You can use it. Not that you would need to do this but after you have stretched it you should not try and put it in a 35c as it would be hard to do so without a fold in the tube.


3

Slime is lighter and conveniently pre-applied in the convenience of you own own home/garage. Slime tube sealant As for can the tube be repaired? The PedalPower can says temporary but not exactly sure what that means. As for Sime if it seals a small puncture I just stay with Slime only. If it is a larger puncture it might be too big to repair period. I ...


3

Based on your edit, do this. Remove the wheel, deflate to about 10 PSI, then roll it along the ground, pressing down hard, for several revolutions. After you've done this examine the strip. Anywhere where the strip is not showing the "average" amount, tug on the tire to pull it out. Anywhere where the strip is showing too much, first examine the opposite ...


3

The visible strip sticking out from the top of the rim and inside the line is in fact the Chafer strip. This is on the tire to prevent the bead hook on the rim from cutting into the tire. The bead is the wire or in the case of folding tire such as the x'plor ush Kevlar ring on the edge of each tire. When seating the tire the bead is place inside the bead ...


3

One critical step that's often missed is thoroughly bedding the patch. After installing it (I prefer the glue to not be totally dry but with a few specks of "damp" yet) but before removing the plastic backing you take something like a smooth-ended tire iron and rub it slowly back and forth across the patch, pressing hard. This assures that the patch, tube, ...


3

Pros of Latex Tubes Lightweight compared to butyl tubes More flexible than butyl tubes, leading to a smoother ride. Cons of Latex Tubes More expensive (about 3 to 4 times the price) May be more susecptable to blowouts. Should be powedered with talc before installing to reduce stickyness and avoid pinching. Looses pressure more quickly due to more porus ...


3

Well, I hoped someone with more recent experience would chime in. It's been 20 years since I used tubulars, but here's what I remember. While the glue is important, the inflation of the tire will hold the tire to the rim. The glue is largely there to prevent the tire rolling when you're cornering hard and to keep the tire on the rim if you get a flat/slow ...


3

Its extremely unlikely for an inner tube to just burst. It sounds like you are suffering from punctures. There are two types of puncture; the first is an object penetrating the tire and inner tube, and the second is a 'pinch' puncture where an impact causes the inner tube to be pinched between the tire and rim. Many bikes (even expensive ones) come with ...


3

Yes, absolutely. Spend an extra 20 dollars on good tires and you could save yourself 30 dollars worth of tubes. Plan on spending somewhere around 40 to 50 dollars a tire. Even if tubes were free, the money is worth saving the hours spent on the side of the road dealing with flats. Look for tires in the 'training' or 'commuting' category, for extra puncture ...


3

As I've said in other answers, the right tire pressure function of you and your bike and your terrain. You'll have to play with the tire pressure to balance the ride quality.Just because the tire says pressure x on the sidewall doesn't mean it makes any sense running the tire at that pressure since it might just give a bouncy ride which compromises your ...


2

Yes, the number most usually listed is 700x32, so anything with that in the range will be the right size. You can even get away with slightly bigger or smaller tubes in a pinch. The ones you linked to should be fine, or try these from Schwalbe. Some people recommend Schwalbe for reliable tubes as well as tyres. Note valves: It might matter whether you ...


2

You may be doing everything right but have done something to get a series of small punctures. For example, I have had the misfortune of riding across an empty lot littered with small cactus plants (I didn't known it at the time as I was visiting the area). This left my tube littered with small punctures clustered together. As I patched one hole I would ...


2

This kind of thing is common. I'm answering because I can't comment yet, but the previous answer nailed it. I just wanted to add. You need to really inspect the tire around where the punctures are happening. The worst thing is small bits of metal wire from decaying car tires that litter roads. They get stuck in the rubber in your bike tires and are really ...


2

Had exactly the same problem in a 700 x 350 Duro tyre after repairing a puncture and could not understand why the back wheel wobbled so much. Adjusted the spokes for centering the wheel, checked that there was no tube twist, all to no avail. There was however on close inspection about a ten inch point where the Tyre looked as though it was "blown" out ...


2

I looked around the internet to find any evidence of the effects of tire liners on speed, but couldn't find any. I was considering using them while touring. So, I did my own test. My bike is a mid-range steel framed tourer with Schwalbe 26" x 1 3/8 Delta Cruisers. The tubes are Bontrager. I installed the liners as per instructions and took the bike out for ...


2

Forget the slime, thornproof tubes, and tire liners. IMO, the best puncture protection for under $40 are Vittoria Randonneurs. I've had excellent luck with them. I had a pair of Gatorskins before the Randonneurs, and trust me, Kevlar belts do not work as well. Because the Kevlar is a woven material, very sharp objects can penetrate between the Kevlar ...



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