Hot answers tagged

18

I've seen that color before. If you are filling from a compressed air tank, make sure the tank has been bled recently. More frequently in humid areas air tanks will get condensation inside. Normal maintenance is to bled the water out of the tank. The condensation rusts the inside of the tank and can eventually cause tank failure. When you put an air line on ...


15

As a heavy rider personally, I don't have many issues with flats. A normal tire on the high/maximum pressure works fine to avoid pinch flats. The key is to check tire pressure every time you get on the bike. Even a day will allow a tire to soften 10 psi, and that will allow flats to occur. Road hazard flats are not avoidable except by avoiding the ...


11

It should be straight out, perpendicular to the rim. Otherwise you risk damaging the tube. When the valve stem is at an angle the valve isn't free in the hole – it is trapped by the edges of the hole where they bind the stem. The edges of the hole may cut the stem which will be moving a little bit as the tire and tube flex over bumps and the like. There ...


9

Yes, inner tubes do that. They are like balloons, except that the butyl rubber they are made of doesn't stretch like natural latex rubber. You are not supposed to inflate tubes outside a tire. Tires have fabric casing to withstand the pressure.


9

It won't cause a problem with your brakes – the tire casing will prevent the tube from "over expanding." Your tire is a bit smaller than the small end of the range for the tube. You may find it a little harder to fit in the extra material and it would be good to take a bit of extra care to make sure you don't pinch the tube if you use tire levers. Be ...


8

Either will work. Use what your prefer. Smaller will weigh a bit less and be easier to install. Larger won't have the tube stretched as much, so hypothetically could survive a puncture better.


8

Yes, they're usually solid rubber and they're very heavy, hard to fit and have a lot more rolling resistance than you're used to. Companies like "airless tyres" make them, and I suggest trying to fit them yourself before taking them to a bike shop and paying whatever they ask to have them fit the solid tubes. You can also get puncture resistant tubes that ...


8

Occam's razor says that you should try the simpler/null hypothesis first, in this case that your tube wasn't stolen. There are two alternate hypotheses that you should test: 1) Are you sure that you had one in the first place? Perhaps you were running tubeless and never knew it? 2) Are you sure the tube is actually gone? One thing that can happen (either ...


6

Tubes expand quite a lot as they are inflated - Try pumping one up on its own and see how quickly if expands (don't over do it unless you never want to use the tube again.). The way tubes and tires work, the tube holds the air in, the tire prevents the tube expanding. The 1.5-2.2 means the tube is suitable for a tire 1.5 up to 2.2 and is ideal for you 2.1 ...


6

I'm not sure you know what tubular tires are (they are relatively rare), but I'll describe the 3 basic tire systems for bicycles: The most common is the good old clincher tire. (Image from Wikipedia: Bicycle Tire) The tire (4=bead,6=casing,7=tread) hooks into the rim (1) via the bead (4). The air is held through an inner tube (5) which is protected from ...


6

Perhaps someone was playing a prank on you. It would be very easy (less than a minute) to deflate the tube, cut it, then pull it out. You actually wouldn't need to touch anything else on the bike and depending on the tire size, might not even need to remove the tire. I have used cut tubes as a "tie-on" bungie cord in several instances, so it's also ...


6

We don't do product rec here, but some general advice: You want to find the biggest tires you can fit into the bike, and run them at high pressure. The pressure written on the tire sidewall is useless (the maximum pressure depends on the rim and the tire), but in all likelihood you will be close to or exceeding it on many tires. The particular model of tire ...


6

Do a web search for tandem tires. A tandem bike carries two people, so typical loads are even bigger than you. Also, definitely use a pressure gauge. You may think you can tell by feel, but I ride every day and can't tell the difference between 80 and 100 psi.


6

You don't need the nut, really (and its rather abnormal on Schrader valve tube) -- a lot of people just throw it away. The point of the nut is so that the tube's stem doesn't go into the rim when you're trying to inflate the tube and the stem doesn't move around when you're trying to pump the tire. Note that the tube can only go significantly into the rim ...


5

I've glued hundreds of tubulars and learned the craft from some of the best mechanics in the sport including a former wrench with the Motorola team and a former Mavic Service Course mechanic. These days tubulars are really only used in cyclocross, track and at the very top level of the sport. There are some very distinct downsides: Safety. Improperly ...


5

If your tyre says 700x28c, that means your wheel has 700c of diameter and your tyre is size 28. You should buy a tube that perfectly fits this, and this is very easy as because tubes have, in the box, the diameter of the wheel they were made for, in your case 700c, and the range of the tires they are made for. So if the tube says 24-26 that is ok for you, if ...


5

Yes, they do degrade over time. Unfortunately, various brands and different storage conditions yield different results, so I'm not able to give an estimation of how long can you safely store a tube. How ever, I can recommend the conditions that appeared to give best results. The tubes I could use after long time of storage without problems where those that ...


5

I typed this whole answer and then decided to cut to the chase, which I doing here. IF you do not have a tiny splinter hidden in the tire I think you are pinching the tube between the tire and the rim during installation. This explains the flats at 50-60 lbs. Losing weight is not the problem. It might be part of the problem - that is to say that someone who ...


5

I'm not sure why this question needed four paragraphs to explain, but I'll indulge it. However, I want to point out that the most effective decision is whatever results in a reliable tube using the least amount of time, money, and effort to accomplish. That should be obvious and not need to be pointed out. That said, I would personally buy a new tube and ...


5

The correct answer is yes and no. There are in fact two types of Presta valves: One where the core can be removed. Those are often used with tubular tyres so that the inner tube can be filled with a sealant (latex) fluid. Some higher quality tubes also have removable core valves for the same purpose. Normal and cheaper tubes have Presta valves where the core ...


5

Are you having problems with flats too frequently for comfort? If not, leave them alone. If you are, whats causing the flats? Punctures? Too low tire pressure? If its the latter, sealant won't help. But, people do put Stans sealant into tubes to do the same purpose like Slime to deal with punctures. It comes with the usual caveats just like Slime ...


5

No, you shouldn't be able to peel a patch off, regardless of if its a glued or glueless patch. Confirming that this is a wet-glue patch that has failed to stick? Possible causes for failure of a patched tube You didn't clean the tube properly you didn't buff the tube properly There is a ridge in the tube which is in the way, has left a tunnel of weakness ...


5

It is a commonly used quick and dirty fix when you don't have a purpose-built grommet to install in a rim cut for a Schrader valve. It may also not be a terrible idea if, for whatever reason, your Presta-hole rim has a burr or sharp edge and you want to avoid any possibility of problems with that.


5

This is close to my goto answer for tyre issues. Tyres designed for touring use are meant for higher loads and inflation pressures. I run marathon plus on my commuter hybrid. They make a 26x2.0 version which is rated to a load of 260lb per tyre and 70psi inflation (which you could probably exceed a little). It's possble that won't fit your rim (see ...


4

I agree with your diagnosis: it must be related to the rim tape. Take it off and inspect it and the rim below. If you don't find anything obvious, buy new, good quality rim tapes, check there are no sharp edges, and reinstall.


4

Firstly, you are one impressively persistent woman! Yes, of course weight is a factor. You just need equipment that will deal with it. In addition to the points made by jqning, I'm thinking that several things can help you Larger and better tires would help. I checked out the Electra website, but couldn't be sure which bike you have. Some do have bigger ...


4

I would say, you just didn't put the tire on well. When you inflate the tire to half its recommended pressure you should check that the tire seats well for the whole diameter around the rim on both sides. If it came out even a little, push it back in (may require some deflating). Otherwise the pressure may push the tire out like you had, and then the tube ...


4

Sometimes the puncture in an inner tube is very small and the air leaks out very slowly. This is called a slow puncture. The classic technique for finding a slow puncture is to immerse the partially inflated inner tube in water and watch for the appearance of any bubbles. In my experience even the slowest punctures usually get bigger somehow - I don't ...


4

My last 26" tube cost $8 NZ, so not a lot. Depends how much time you want to invest, and how much patches cost. Poor abrading/sanding/scouring ot the area before applying the rubber cement will leave an area of bad adhesion, and the pressurised air can find its way out. I bet you were in a hurry and didn't give the cement 10 minutes to cure before ...


4

To fit 700c (ISO 622) wheels into a bike built for 27" (ISO 630) you only need to shift the rim brake pads down 4mm. If you're exceptionally lucky your current brakes will have enough reach and you'll just have to adjust the pads. That's the first thing to check, because if that doesn't work there's no way you're going to do this on a $50 budget. 2" wide ...



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