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8

You need to move the open end of the posts closer together so you can pop that plate into place. To do that, bend the chain sideways at that master link to get it to close. There's a bit of technique, but it's not too hard to close (opening it again often requires three hands - the extra one to lift the plate off. Sometimes the plate will pop off if you ...


6

It goes outside the rim, where you can see it. It's not even strictly necessary. It really only exists to keep the valve stem in place while you air the tire up, which makes the whole process much easier. Weight weenies throw them away to save a couple grams. Also note that if you use it, you don't want to screw it down too tight. Doing so can crimp your ...


3

Well, I hoped someone with more recent experience would chime in. It's been 20 years since I used tubulars, but here's what I remember. While the glue is important, the inflation of the tire will hold the tire to the rim. The glue is largely there to prevent the tire rolling when you're cornering hard and to keep the tire on the rim if you get a flat/slow ...


3

I've never cracked a crown race after assembling many different bikes with different fork/headset configurations. Split crown race makes things far easier and it means one less specialty tool that you need to own or access to get the job done. I've never had an issue with split races either. As for splitting your own, lots of people do it without issues, if ...


3

The pin should line up with the inside of the crankarm.


2

@Adam Rice is almost there, diagram and suggestion included for what to do now... First, you need a curved 18mm diameter washer between the brake and the fork. Your brake is a Shimano clone, here is how the original Shimano drive works out: Note that there is no serrated washer between the curved washer and the brake. Secondly, you need a 27mm long ...


2

Most components will have an instruction sheet detailing the reccomended torque. This is typically measured in Nm (newton meters). Torque wrenches can also be purchased that show you how much torque you apply. Some components even have the reccomended torque value on the component itself. Checking other components will give you an indication of the ...


2

The frame design dictates caliper placement. In your case the mount is between the seat and chain stays. You are correct that the more common method is to run the brake cable along the top tube and down the seat stay. This allows for fewer and less sharp bends in the cable. Running the cable along the toptube and down the seatpost to the chainstay will ...


2

These are the alloy versions of the 'Sachs Huret' steel efforts of that period and I am familiar with the tension problems that can happen if you take them apart and put them back together again. You undid the lower Allen key bolt, didn't you? You need to take the little bolt on the side of the cage off, then undo the lower Allen bolt, swing the cage ...


2

A general procedure with too tight clamps: Put in the screw or a longer one of the same diameter from the opposite side. Fit a piece of (hard, like a small coin) metal into the slot. Tighten the screw carefully. It should open the clamp enough to fit it over the bar


1

The cup marked L goes on the left-hand side of the frame (the non-drive side) and consequently the cup marked R goes on the right-hand side. Make sure you tighten the cups in the correct direction (the drive side cup is reverse threaded) and be sure not to cross thread the frame. As for the spacers, I presume that the frame has a bottom bracket width of 73 ...


1

Typically there will be a serrated washer between the brake arms and the fork to prevent the brake mech from rotating. I can't tell if you've got one installed, but if you don't, you should. It's hard to tell from the picture you've posted, but I think there should be more separation between the brake arms and the fork, regardless. Front brakes and rear ...


1

Your caliper should stay reasonably well-centered. Are you certain that all the nuts and washers are in place to allow you to adjust the position of the brake with a thin brake wrench and then tighten the the other two nuts to keep everything in place? Other than that, a track fork really isn't designed for a brake. Yes, there is a hole in there for that ...


1

Originally these levers came with three parts per side - the concave bit that goes on the downtube, the lever and the screw to hold it all together. The concave bit only goes on one way - turn them 180 degrees if it is not screwing together. And that should be it, see: ...


1

The Shimano Techdocs site has installation manuals and exploded diagrams of Shimano components. While it's possible your shifters may not be on the site, you can probably find a set that's similar enough.


1

Based on your comments in Mathew's answer, it may be that either the spring in the area has fatigued beyond useful recovery, or that it has been replaced with the spring windings turning the wrong direction. Try reversing the spring in its housing, and if not that, then replace the spring.



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