Hot answers tagged

7

This picture shows a slightly better angle. You need to first loosen the lock nut slightly, then spin the adjuster barrel until it unscrews right off the threaded rod on the chain. When you re-assemble you reverse that, and have to re-adjust the tension so that it shifts properly.


5

The advantages of the Pinion are that the weight and complexity are in the middle of the bike and not being bounced around in the hub of the rear wheel, especially for a bike with suspension (the unsprung weight is lower). Also, because it sits in a custom housing it can be whatever size and shape they want, rather than being constrained by the width of the ...


4

Here is how I found the answer (30-45 N-m): Followed the link in the first comment on the question (or I could have done a search for something like "shimano alfine hub service pdf"). The link Gordon provided was led to several Shimano products identified only by part number, so I did another search for "shimano alfine 11 hub" and found a listing on Amazon ...


4

Pure anecdata from my experiences. The Rohloff is substantially cheaper as well as more reliable. I don't know how long a Rohloff lasts because I haven't worn the first one out yet. Three Nexus 8 hubs failed at 5000km each. I had a Shimano Nexus 8 in a single-speed MTB fram that I commuted on for a few years. I only did about 5000km/year, the the hub only ...


4

The biggest pro for Pinion is the ability to easily switch between wheelsets without having to own multiple expensive hubs. The biggest con (and it is a big one) for Pinion is that it requires a frame made for it. Nearly any frame can take a Rohloff hub.


4

I have a Shimano Nexus 7 internally geared hub. When replacing my chain, I have a chaintool to remove the pins to shorten chains, which usually start out the length intended for a dérailleur. When the chain starts to wear, I move the wheel back a bit in the horizontal dropouts. See Sheldon Brown's entry for dropouts. I can't tell from your picture what ...


4

"Old" bikes – those from before the '80s or so – usually have horizontal dropouts that allow maybe 2 or 3 cm of fore and aft movement. That should give you enough room to tension the chain. I would think that a 5-speed bike would date from this era and be built with horizontal dropouts. If that's the case then you can probably don't need a chain tensioner, ...


4

Most aluminum frames have a replaceable derailleur hanger, which typically is part of the dropout itself as you can kind of see in this image: Without it, the dropout is indeed too thin and your spacing is messed up, not to mention that the strength of the dropout is decreased. You need to identify the correct replacement hanger and get it fixed. Also, I ...


4

The closest to that is the Sachs DD3 "dual drive" hubs that are a 3 speed IGH with a standard cassette mount, available in 8,9 or 10 speed cassette versions. According to this site the ratios in the hub are 0.73,1,1.36 giving 1.86 between high and low gears. That's wider than a double chainring setup but narrower than most triples (a 20/30/40T triple has a ...


4

Old, plain, one-gear Velosteel-like hubs had this feature thanks to using rollers instead of cogs, but I suppose it does not meet your expectations. If you REALLY need this feature you can modify Shimano Nexus 3 to obtain what you want by removing four cogs from part no 4 shownhere. You will lose 1st gear, rest will work as before.


4

Yes, that's fine. You won't damage the hub that way, although you might damage the cable attachments if they get caught in the chain, or lose some pieces. Single cable systems work by pulling and releasing the cable, and one gear is always "cable completely slack", just as it is when there's no cable there. Like what you did. It's just like a rear ...


3

You've answered your own question. It all comes down to cable pull, so use an accurate measuring tool like a vernier caliper, and see exactly how much cable is pulled per click. Use a dot of white-out ("twink") to help measure accurately. The cable itself is quite irrelevant, its the shifter on the handlebar that does the stepping, and the deraileur has a ...


3

To the last question, a far better order of doing things would have been to disconnect the shifting cable first. The knurled part at the end of cable rotates on the threaded piece at the end of the chain, visible through the hole in the wheel nut. Rotate it to disconnect the cable.


3

From your photo, it looks like you're fine. The load from the hub is being taken on the anti-rotation arm that you've attached to the lateral tubes of your mixte. So the anti-rotation washer (I'm presuming you're talking about the orange washer) is not being loaded. Also, as described in the responses to your previous question, your dropout is just ...


3

That cog is barely worn at all. I wouldn't bother flipping it until the tip of the teeth is about 2mm, and then I'd ride it until the tips were breaking off. Specifically, that's what I actually do and I have a cog bolted to my workshop wall to remind me what "slightly too worn" looks like. The problem is that the chain starts to skip or hang, because the ...


3

It is normal - cogs of 1st gear turn slower than that from 2nd and 3rd gear, so are overrun and click into hub housing. You can "silent" it a bit by opening the hub and greasing hub housing, where the cogs work.


2

My Alfine 8spd has lasted about 6 years of light to medium city commuting in Seattle (all year round) maybe averaging about 25 miles a week. That's about 7,500 miles. I have done absolutely nothing to it. However, it is completely shot now, and needs to be replaced. I feel like that's pretty good service. Clearly not a Rohloff, and clearly the Rohloff is ...


2

While using IGH hub it's good to learn pedal repositioning technique different from freewheel hub. You may observed that when bike is pushed backwards, the pedals also go backwards. Of course, at junction there is not enough distance to go back enough to lift your favourite pedal to position convenient for start. But you really need centimetres-long distance ...


2

I'm a little puzzled by the threads that look like they should draw the hub's axle back to tension the chain. They don't appear like they can move, but it also doesn't look like there is a nut on them to pull the axel back. Do you know if they thread into the frame, or are they free to slide? That said, it appears that the load on the mechanism would tend ...


2

After a bit of thinking I filed off cogs from the outside. So far so good, hub presents good enegagement at all gears. After few weeks it still runs good. Left is "fixed", right shown for comparison. I fixed (filed) both. Be careful to make them equal shape and that sharp border is not too thin and ortogonal to the side surface


2

Whatever you may read this CAN'T work properly simply because the gaps between each of the shifts are different on the Shimano Alfine SG-S700, there are THREE different gaps. The only shifters not made by Shimano to operate this hub properly are: Jtek 11 Speed Bar End Shifter and: 11 Speed Microshift Inter11 STI Levers


2

If you really want that wide a ratio, the widest ratio chainset combined with the widest ratio cassette commercially available would get you very close. There are crank sets that can take chain rings from 22 to 50 teeth (finding a front derailleur that could do this range might be hard), and an 11-40 cassette. Cross-chaining would be a bad thing given how ...


1

In short: If chain comes off with horizontal drops (typical internal gear or single speed) the wheel has to be too far ahead. Try pulling wheel backwards until the chain can be moved <5 mm and tension the wheel properly. Other possible issues are: - bent chainring or sprocket - wheel not installed properly - failed bearings in hub or bottom bracket ...


1

You can flip the bike over; there is a second set of alignment marks on the bottom of the cassette joint. Shimano Nexus Hub Adjustment Scroll down to "Gear Adjustment"; there are drawings that are helpful. This page in general has great information on Shimano's internally geared hubs; worth the read. You can also purchase a new cassette joint. I've ...


1

Sounds like you know the chain will work with the sprocket on your hub. You will need to shorten the chain, if you use the same one. It's usually better to get a new chain, and make the chain just long enough so that it has a cm or so play with the back wheel a little forward of the middle of the dropouts. As the chain wears (some say stretches) you will ...


1

Try something specifically designed for seized parts. PBlaster or Kroil come to mind. Whatever you do, definitely exhaust the non-mechanical remedies before you get out the breaker bar!


1

A Brompton uses a 16" wheel size, which means you could get a used Brompton wheel with Sturmey Archer 3-speed hub and swap it out. The only problem is that such wheels are rather expensive even used.


1

I also have a folding bike with a 3-speed hub (Shimano Nexus 3). My bike has a chain protection cover in the front chainring, so I find it harder to follow those other suggestions. I usually prefer to put the chain over the front sprocket in the first place. The chain is also as tight as I can, but sometimes it happens that it falls over. I have noticed ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible