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5

No, it is not a good idea. You'd be spending more than the bike is worth even for a basic internal gear hub (even assuming you got the wheel rebuilt for free using the existing rim and spokes, if possible), let alone buying a rear wheel with an IGH built in. You do need a chain tensioning pulley or horizontal dropouts, which while can be built more robustly ...


4

You are correct. This is different than "regular" cables. On regular cables you pick the end you want and cut off the other. Thats because the connection on the cut-off end is usually a clamp. You run the cable under a screw/nut and tighten it down. Then you just put a cable crimp on the end to protect the cut cable However, your internal hub cable is ...


3

The HP Velotechnik Scorpion is available with three front chain rings, three-gear internal hub, 8-speed rear derailleur setup. This has the additional advantage that you can shift while stopped, e.g. after emergency stops or similar. I found it rather tedious to keep the overview over which gear I'm currently in. My Velomobiel Quest has triple front, ...


2

Do not use a mis-matched internal geared hub for your frame. You risk damage to your gear hub, your frame, or both. Aluminum frames are much stiffer than steel frames, which is good for good for riding, but it is also prone to cracking due to this stiffness (when compared to steel's malleability). Even if you do fit the part, it will be a weak point in the ...


2

I don't think you're going to be able to swap the guts of an internally geared hub on to a prebuilt wheel that doesn't have the same hub on it to start. If you buy a new rim, you should be able to do a rim swap relatively easy if you have a truing stand. Simply tape the rims together and swap the spokes over to the new rim one at a time. Then you'll need ...


2

I'm very skeptical that an internal fault in the hub is causing the external mounting of it to loosen up... unless you are experiencing frequent total rear wheel lockup and skidding, maybe. I have a SRAM P5 hub that I built into an old mountain bike myself. Originally I ignored SRAM's torque instructions for the rear axle nuts and just tightened them by ...


2

In my experience with various internal gear hubs on Dutch bikes, I found there's no maintenance necessary: I've never heard of them breaking down because of lack of maintenance. Here's a blog post that concurs. My current Gazelle bike manual also does not explicitly mention any maintenance on the hub gears, only how to adjust them.


1

What you know right now is that there's quite a lot of it and it's quite greasy. Which is useful, but not especially useful. One thing that occurs to me is to question whether someone else might have oiled the belt for you? Has it been in a shop, or do you have someone else in your house who maintains a bike? Is there a source of fumes where you store your ...


1

My experience as a bicycle mechanic in the Netherlands: don't mess with it. If it is an Shimano, it will probably run >100.000 km. If it is a Sturmey Archer, SRAM or any other well known brand, it will mostly do >50.000 km as well. If there is a small hole for lubricant, only do this once a year or so, with some thin grease, but not oil. Oil is to thin. ...


1

You will likely be using at least one of the hubs outside of its maximum torque specification when riding in a low gear. Here's a random thread about a guy breaking a NuVinci by overtorquing it with a gas motor assist: http://forums.mtbr.com/internal-gear-hubs/how-much-power-will-alfine-handle-551706.html#5


1

I recently bought a bike with an Alfine 8 transmission. I plan to add a Chain Glider. It will mean changing the front chain ring to one of the supported sizes, so I will buy the Chain Glider, a Surly chainring and new rear sprocket from SJS Cycles on the basis of this thread. Here and here are some positive reviews.


1

The last time I rebuilt an internal gear hub was when I was a kid with a Sturmey Archer 3-speed. These things are at a whole other level. That said, it depends on you, your tools, and mechanical know-how. Most shops would not attempt it unless they are a dealer, because they would not be sure of a positive outcome. We would need pictures to corroborate ...


1

Sheldon Brown has a good page on frame adjustment - I especially refer you to his instructions on aluminum (and carbon) frames - DON'T As long as you can get the nuts on far enough that axle thread is visible, you will be OK, however, at 13mm for the frame, washer and nut, I will be surprised. You might be tempted to use a smaller spacer and compress the ...


1

I bought a CRX City Commuter bike in 2007, with a Nexus 8 hub gear. I've riden it 18kms (approx 11 miles), 4 days a week, since then, excepting holidays. A bit over 20,000km in all. It's not particularly fast or mechanically efficient, but very reliable. In terms of maintenance, Ive had it packed with grease once and that's all. In contrast, my brakes ...


1

Like Daniel said, a good rule of thumb is to keep oils off rubber and plastics. Some will damage them, some will preserve them, but you don't want either type on your tires. You should be more worried about the fact that the oily spot on your rear tire can cause it to break traction much more easily, especially while braking or cornering. If you're going to ...


1

My 1st suggestion is if what you have still works, don't change it. SA experts tell you any SA cable replaces easily. Bull. Some shifters require a different type of cable end and different ferrel. You have to get a matching type. There are at least two different diameters of indicator spindle and barrel adjusters, with the larger diameter barrel being ...



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