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16

I too contemplated using a smartphone as a bike computer and eventually bought a Garmin Edge 800, which I've been very happy with. Here are the advantages it has: GPS is better. Compare these two GPS traces from a ride my friend and I did yesterday evening (taken from Strava). This is a 2.5km climb, part wooded and part exposed. The first is my Edge 800 ...


15

Cyclemeter is my favorite ride tracker. If you are a bike commuter, you will appreciate seeing your splits and daily times. Endomondo is also a nice app, and runs on a variety of other smartphones. It's free, but more web-based, whereas cyclemeter is more phone-only.


13

I love the strava app (and the strava.com website) The app will record your ride and map the route via GPS and upload to the strava website for further analysis. Strava will auto-detect any significant climb and mark it as a segment, or match sections of your ride against already existing segments. Once you upload a few rides and see how cool the segments ...


6

Have you tried "Get there by bike"? http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/get-there-by-bike-interactive/id457288250?mt=8 The few times i tried it i had good results. Another alternative, but i have not used yet. http://www.bikemapsapp.com/


6

I do think that an iPhone and ANT+ makes for a pretty compelling combination. One thing that the dedicated bike GPS hardware has all over a smartphone is battery life. While you can get better battery life out of a smartphone when logging a ride than most people imagine, it's still not close to the battery life you can get out of dedicated GPS hardware. You ...


6

I use runkeeper app for iphone. The app has an option to pick which type of activity and cycling is an option. I keep the iphone in my running armband. I didn't want to buy a mount just because of my luck with riding in poor weather and the running band does provide a small amount of protection The one catch is batter power. On my old 3G I had to turn ...


5

Biologic now makes an iPhone 4 specific mount. I have the 3 version that I use an iPhone 4 in. It's pretty decent, but this looks like they've made some good improvements.


5

A lot of the jogging apps will work well for on the bicycle as well, since most of the data collection is done via the GPS. As for the mounts, I've seen this one used a bit and it looks fairly sturdy. Not sure about the attachment to the bars, though. I would just be careful with the kind of riding you're doing. An iPhone costs $400 to $600 dollars if ...


5

You might want to look at the Biologic ReeCharge by Dahon. It says it hooks up to any standard dynamo hub. The nice thing about this is that it has it's own battery. So the dynamo changes the internal battery and the battery charges your phone/gps/device. This allows you to change while you are resting, as well as provide added protection against sending ...


4

I got this one: http://www.meritline.com/gps-cellphone-holder-for-bicycle---p-30668.aspx Its actually one of the cheapest available. It fits adjustable handlebar sizes, tho I don't know the range. The phone grips are foam based and you can get a very snug fit, and it clicks quickly out. I never had an issue with it popping out, it never even looked like it ...


4

If you are in the UK, use CycleStreets. It's a free journey-planning website designed specifically for cycling, so it can route you across off-road cycle tracks and bridges, and it gives you a choice of faster routes for more confident cyclists, and quieter routes if you want to avoid traffic. As well as the main and a mobile website, they have free apps for ...


4

Here's one option: http://h1987995.stratoserver.net/magento/supernova-the-plug-ii-plus-usb-dynamolader.html SUPERNOVA The Plug II Plus USB power supply Transforms dynamo AC to exact USB spec. DC 5V, 500 mA E‐Bike compatible for 12‐ 48V DC with optional cable Works with Garmin, Ipod&Iphone 3GS & 4G & 4GS Seems pretty expensive at €159, but ...


3

The three main advantages of a dedicated bike computer is battery life, reliability, and visibility. Only a handful of smartphones I've used can consistently run for 5+ hours with the GPS on. It would really suck to be 30 miles from home with a dead battery. Cycling computers can often run 10+ hours with a GPS. Some smartphone/app combos have questionable ...


3

As a plus for Smart-Phone apps, they are likely to progress quicker, add features faster, fix bugs faster, and provide more frequent version updates than GPS units. Another plus for smart-phones is that I'll take my cell phone on a long road ride anyway in case of emergency. Carrying 1 device is easier than 2. A plus for a GPS unit is that it is probably ...


3

I have owned 2 different smartphone mounts (Blackberry, iPhone). Before getting a mount, determine if you have a straight section of your handlebar that's at least an inch long, preferably 1.3 inches or more. Mounts with rigid plastic secured by screws will require that. Key attributes: Favor rigid molded plastic mounts secured by screws over the kinds ...


3

www.gpxnavigator.com No there is no voice guidance now, but probably it's a good feature request for the future. The application supports navigating through waypoints, or routes in GPX files. You can have multiple routes in a GPX file. The navigation is basically showing the direction, distance and some other useful information of the next 2 waypoints. Also ...


3

http://www.motionx.com/ is the closest I've seen. You can set it's map to show track up as you ride. It doesn't know where the roads are though, nor zoom in or out depending on your speed, nor show upcoming turns.


3

There is a great article on MTBR about their best iPhone apps, here is what they found: 5 - “The Bike Computer” ( http://www.everytrail.com/iphone.php) FREE - Provides a large display of speed and distance based on your iPhone’s GPS. Also contains a bunch of other GPS based features, but the clean and simple bike computer is the best part. 4 - iTunes - ...


3

I use Motion-X as my tracking app and it can certainly import GPX and then navigate from it. It supports some ANT+ (at least HRM). Additionally the OpenStreetMap wiki has a good list of iOS apps comparing their functionality.


3

If you have an iPhone or an Android phone there are various free options, some based on OpenStreetMaps, but even Google's own solution is excellent. For google maps you can download areas to store locally (for those areas you know you will have no connectivity) and it is free! I'm playing a lot of Ingress at the moment, which requires 10 - 20 hour stints ...


2

I've tried Runkeeper also but I'm much happier with Runmeter: http://www.abvio.com/runmeter/ It does the same GPS tracking that other apps do, but its interface is the nicest I've seen (especially important when you just want to start riding!). It has nifty data export features, too -- you can get all of your data as a CSV file if you want. Because I'm a ...


2

I use http://www.everytrail.com/ service. They have blackberry and iphone apps. I stash the iphone under the seat (in a under the seat pouch) and it records all my movements and then I can upload it to the server and facebook share ;-)


2

For what it's worth velcro and rubber are extremely good for this sort of application. I use one of these rubber blocks with velcro straps to attach my LED Lenser to my MTB, it holds really tight and if you position it right there is minimal shake. One day I decided to see how it would handle my iPhone so I could watch/hear endomondo giving me my lap times. ...


2

Although this question is over 1 year old, I thought I'd share a new iPhone mount that I've just come across. Its called the Quad Lock and has a mounting system very similar to the Garmin and Bryton GPS computers (uses a quarter turn mount that attaches to the stem): http://www.quadlockcase.com/ I don't have one (nor do I have any association with the ...


2

Having used an iPhone app for over 3 months now, I can definitely say that it has been very helpful. Just make sure the phone is fully charged before the ride so that there's enough charge left, in case you need to use the phone on your way back home. Some more pointers on who might find a phone app useful Someone who is primarily interested in shorter ...


2

Google Maps for iPhone now has bike layer support and bike-specific navigation starting with update on July 16, 2013, version 2.0


2

You can do it with cyclemeter directly from safari or email within your iphone.


1

Tomtom for me. A little expensive but I like having built-in maps so that the mapping works when there is no phone reception. The voice directions are also good enough not to need looking at the phone.


1

Battery life and water resistance are the two key ones for me. The other one that hasn't been mentioned is price. If you leave a smart phone in your handlebars while popping into a shop it will get stolen. A typical bike computer won't.



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