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17

If, by stands, you mean bike mounted kickstands, then the reason most mountain bikers don't use them is three fold: Safety. The kickstand is usually a relatively cheap piece of metal, bolted on wherever it will fit. Its shape and style lend themselves to ending up in your wheel or otherwise damaging the bike, if they are not secured to the frame so they ...


9

You have a few options here. You can get a two-legged kickstand. These are primarily used with heavy touring loads, but they will help stabilize the bike when parking with an uneven load. The two legs fold up into each other when you disengage the kickstand. You generally cut these with a hacksaw to shorten them to the appropriate length. I used one for a ...


7

You should look into getting a folding double kickstand. They're great for loaded bikes. Both legs fold off to the left side, but when you kick it down one leg supports each side so the bike stays perfectly upright.


7

Mountain bikes don't see kickstands for several reasons. One, they are durable. You can lay one down and it's no big deal, certainly not as big a deal as crashing one. Next, when you're out riding terrain, there's almost always something to lean your bike up against like a tree, fence, etc. Also, as you mention, things can get caught in the kickstand. ...


6

Whether a bike has a kickstand is really a personal decision, but what the frame is made of is important. If you're not concerned with scratching the frame, and the frame is reasonable sturdy, then get yourself a kickstand; it'll make the bike more usable, and that's what's important. (I wouldn't attach a kickstand to, say, a carbon frame or a bike with a ...


5

I find that a standers, one-legged kickstand doesn't work well with a full touring load (as you've found). I used a two-legged stand mounted to the frame just behind the bottom bracket, and while that worked well, it scraped up the frame where the kickstand was mounted. Touring without a kickstand was my solution for quite some time, until I found the ...


3

They can catch on stuff. Ground/obstacle clearance is really important. My wheels are often whizzing past rocks with mm of clearance, or even brushing against them. And I'm often dropping down stepped terrain, which means the pedals cranks etc get close to the ground, you don't want anything else that could cause contact. Faff. Offroad cycling is tough on ...


2

You should be able to get a standard kickstand on there unless there is some proprietary frame weld-on by Trek where the stand usually goes. Get a Greenfield kickstand with a plate that looks like this: http://harriscyclery.net/images/library/catalogs/soc/p350X350m/KI1005.jpg I'll bet this can be made to fit. However, truth be told, a kickstand doesn't ...


2

You say that putting the pannier on the opposite side of the bike makes the problem worse. This makes me think the bike isn't well balanced on the stand. The stand may be too short for the bike, so that the bike leans too much. Try putting a block of wood under the stand. If that helps, get a stand with a longer arm (or leg, what is that part called?). ...


2

I used to roll with single kickstands and I went for a very frugal solution using a lid to a salsa jar under my kickstand. This prevents "lawn suck" where my kickstand would pathetically drown in my boggy front lawn, tipping over even when unloaded. I would also adjust the angle of my front tire such that it felt more stable when stopped. Distributing ...


1

In general, you won't see kickstands on more expensive bikes. The primary reason is that a standard kickstand that mounts to the chain stays just behind the BB simply won't fit. Beyond that, the standard kickstand will often not reliably support a bike, and it's better to lay down a bike than have it fall down. There's also the problem that the standard ...


1

I have used a Porteur Double Kickstand on my Surly LHT for touring. It is very stable and reasonably priced. Velo-Orange sells three different double-legged kickstands. I know that the Porteur and Plescher are quite popular and well thought of. http://store.velo-orange.com/index.php/accessories/chainguards-stay-protectors-kickstands.html


1

Further to my comment on that being an amazing rack, maybe it's contributing to the problem? It's hard to tell from the picture (and you say it's not your bike, but you have a similar rack), but it looks like the pannier is held farther from the wheel than it would be with a conventional rack that has stays that bolt to braze-ons near the rear dropouts. ...


1

Ok, just to be clear you're looking for a stand that will: support a full touring load (and survive) should be easy to extend/retract when your hands are full shouldn't get in the way of the pedals when you're cleaning the chain It has been a long time since I used a kickstand, but I used to have a very heavy duty (and it was quite heavy, likely all ...


1

Ok, doesn't anyone use their bike for everyday transportation? When I leave work, and go to the grocery, come home with a basket full of food, without a kickstand I have to juggle the bike while I unload its contents so I can lay it down then pick up my stuff go and unlock my door, bring in groceries, go back out and get my bike that I have left laying in ...


1

I don't have a kickstand on my "light" bike because I only ride it on roads (as opposed to trails) and I don't stop often, so it would be unnecessary. I don't have one on one other bike I own because it refuses to cooperate with a cheap kickstand I have laying around-- it's just my "beater" bike, so I never bothered to get a properly-fitted one. My third ...



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