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57

My suggestion would be: Scout and rehearse your route before you start. This is really an exercise in two parts: First part is to determine what your initial routes from home to work and from work to home (not necessarily the same, certainly not in detail) are going to be. And to work out where you're going to secure your bike for the day. Second part ...


55

Occupy enough lane to make cars think twice about 'sneaking' by you. Get fenders even on your nice road bike a wet butt sucks when you ride home and your shorts are cold. Leave early enough to enjoy the view. My best commute I watched 6 eagles in a field 10' away. Wouldn't have been able to stop for a few minutes if I hadn't left early.


50

You're absolutely right--children's bicycles with training wheels are good for exercise and entertainment, but they do little to nothing for balance. In my experience, the best way to teach anyone--children included--to ride a bicycle is to take the pedals off, lower the seat, and let them scoot & coast around until they develop the proper balance. ...


31

I'm not sure how you'd teach it, but I think an ability to relax and just get on with it has made my commute much more pleasant. I ride about 12 miles each way, through some fairly busy bits of London. There are some bike lanes, advanced stop lines, separated paths and all sorts of possible things to confuse the new bike commuter, but the thing that ...


30

Be as visible as possible, and assume you are invisible. No matter how much neon spandex and blinky lights you have, some drivers won't notice you until it's too late, especially if it is rainy, getting dark, and their radio is on. ASSUME you are invisible and they are all out to hit you, and ride accordingly.


23

Claim your space on busy roads When approaching parked cars, start pulling out into the road well before the parked car. This gives drivers coming up behind you notice that they're going to have to leave you some space so you can get around the car. Also, I sometimes pretend to wobble when I hear a vehicle approaching from behind that sounds like it's fast ...


23

Get a bike that is the proper size and adjustment for you. Especially if your commute is pretty long (10k or more). Bad ergonomics on your bike can lead to injuries that slowly creep up on you and can take very long to heal. I've had a thigh injury that was caused by a bad saddle that took 3 months of no cycling to heal! Get cycling gloves. They keep your ...


21

The Most Direct Route is Not Always the Best Or in other words. Your driving commute route is usually a horrible bicycling commute route. I purposefully avoid big roads as much as possible and take small residential streets or dedicated bike paths when available, an extra mile on a bike path can actually save you time over a shorter busy commute route, not ...


16

This is good for any ride, not just commuting, but sometimes people think that since they're "only" commuting it's not as important: Proper clothing does make a difference! Inflate your tires properly!


15

My dad taught me, my two sisters, my neices and nephews the same basic way. On grass. Get them on a two wheeler, no training wheels, but with helmet on, and start em up on the grass. Find a field that is smooth (maybe a slight downhill to start on) and push them and let them go. Grass is harder to ride on, but soft enough to fall on without damage that ...


15

You may find it easier on your commute, depending on the length of the ride and how much stuff you have to carry with you, to invest in racks and panniers rather than a backpack or messenger bag. My finding has been that weight "on the bike" is much less noticeable than weight attached to your body. If you commute with a full change of clothes, pair of ...


15

Never, ever listen to music while cycling. As Scottie says, "Cyclists use their ears like rear view mirrors." Of course, you should also have a traffic side mirror.


15

I would go with the undersized bike method as Sheldon Brown recommends. Basically, get a bike that's a bit on the small side (and has at least one brake lever) and remove the pedals (and maybe also the cranks), so that he can have his butt on the saddle (seat) and both feet firmly on the ground with knees slightly bent. That way he can run with the bike ...


15

It's silly, but with the saddle down so that he is able to push himself forward with the feet, ask him to pretend he's running on low gravity, trying to go as far as possible between steps. On doing this, he can/could/should lean the bike a bit left when he puts left foot on ground, and lean the bike right when right foot is down. The "secret" is trying to ...


13

you might be surprised how incredibly rude people can be. I'm actually a second generation commuter & have been riding to work my entire adult life, and still am floored regarding how little consideration for your life those in cars take. And commuting puts you in the line of fire for the worst driving behavior--drivers are cranky on their way to work ...


11

Get a seat bag and have at least one spare innertube, a multi-tool, spare CO2 (if that's your inflator of choice, a frame pump otherwise), and park a $10 bill in there. It's not a matter of 'if' you have a mechanical, but 'when'. Anticipate it, prepare for it, and deal with it. More than once (because I don't learn quickly) I got as far from either end of ...


11

Don't. Training wheels can be effective if someone has balance issues, but for those people a tricycle is normally a better approach. To someone with reasonable balance learning to ride, using training wheels impedes learning. For infants, the balance bike toys are great, but they are not available in adult sizes. Instead, remove the cranks, bottom ...


10

Well, I was raised "old school". My dad put me on my first huffy - got behind me and pushed me down the driveway. Well, after 10 to 15 times busting my tail, I got the hang of staying up and was riding on my own in about 2 hours. Afterwards, as I rode through the yard (I grew up on a four acre yard) I crashed, got up and kept going. Just make your ...


9

Rollers are awesome! At least I think so. I have used both a trainer and rollers and I much prefer using the rollers. Once you are used to using the rollers you will be more than capable of doing things like watching a movie. One of the best things about rollers is they magnify issues with your cycling form. Once you have trained enough on the rollers your ...


8

Learning to ride a bike on a traditional pedal bike can be a scary experience for both parent and child. We've all been there. The initial excitement of chosing the brightly colored princess bike or the bike adorned with the latest comic book superhero quickly fades when reality sets in. That reality is that a standard pedal bike is the wrong tool for ...


8

Learn how to fix a flat tire and practice it at home. You don't want to waste a lot of time when you're on the road and stressed about being late. Carry everything you need to fix aforementioned flat: Two tire levers and a patch kit should be fine. Check your patch kit from time to time, and make sure you (a) have enough patches and (b) the glue hasn't ...


8

Stand on pedals to ride over cracks and bumps When you're going over bumps, pot-holes, and cracks in the pavement/asphalt: stand (put all your weight on) the pedals and lift your bum off the seat; and coast (without pedalling) over the obstruction. Doing that is more comfortable for you, and for the bike. (P.S.: I do this wearing bike shoes which clip to ...


7

The one thing l would recommend is puncture proof tyres, I use the Specialized Armadillo range. Only twice in 3 years has anything managed to puncture my inner tubes. I live and commute in a large city, lots of broken glass and other nice stuff and that's what's in the cycle lanes! Don't skimp on clothing it makes a different l have purchased some ...


7

Allow for cool down time once you get to your destination. I've always found that when I'm actually rolling I never feel that hot or sweaty, but as soon as I stop at my destination and don't have the wind on me anymore - BAM! - I'm sweating like a pig. Not a good look when you are about to start work. So I always try to arrive 10 minutes early so I ...


7

Are you thinking to get a small BMX and take the drive train off instead of getting a run bike, so you can put the drive train back on when he's ready? Otherwise I don't quite understand the purpose of the question, sorry. If that is you're idea I'd suggest that's probably not a good idea. It's going to be difficult to find a BMX small enough for a two year ...


7

I ride behind: she sets the pace, concentrates on the road ahead. Being behind I can watch, control the distance between us, speak advice, and manage (i.e. observe and give hand signals to) any vehicles approaching us from behind. Edit: I just found a quote on the front page of http://www.vehicularcyclist.com/index.html "I’ve taken three cycling ...



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