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12

Wouldn't the simplest answer be to switch the saddles between the bikes? You'd probably end up using the less used bike more and the less broken in saddle more too.


10

Brooks recommends applying a layer of proofide to the bottom of the saddle. However, you should not wipe this layer off after it sets. Just leave it on, and it will protect the underside. Personally, I also recommend fenders for a bike that you plan to use frequently in the rain. This will also drastically reduce the amount of water that splashes up into ...


10

As a leather saddle wears out, it tends to sink and become softer in the middle while splaying out around the edges. This, naturally, makes the saddle uncomfortable and uneven. Lacing a saddle is a way to revive it and return it to its natural shape, or at least something close. You should lace your saddle if you find that it has become too soft. And ...


7

Breaking in a leather saddle is a long and painful process sometimes. There are techniques such as soaking it in oil for 30 min to an hour and then re-applying every few months, but nothing is going to work if you don't get your butt on your seat and ride. It can take as much as 1000 miles to break in a saddle. The best advice I can give is get a nice pair ...


6

Since that particular Brooks saddle has a cut out in the middle of the saddle seat surface, there is a loss of support across the top side surface. Eventually the sides would begin to curl and sag and that opening on the surface may widen as the leather became more supple. The lacing will ad some rigidty to the saddle to somewhat control the movement of the ...


6

Brooks makes a product called Proofide for saddle care. For normal use, once or twice a year is likely enough. To use, start with a dry saddle and wipe off any grit or dirt with a dry rag. Then take a very small dab of Proofide and spread it on the top surface of the saddle. You want to spread this out into a very fine layer all over the top (finished) ...


5

Check out Sheldon Brown's commentary on Leather saddles. There is a section on breaking in leather saddles about 2/3 down the page. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/leather.html In addition to the traditional conditioning methods, he also suggests a rather radical 2-step process that involves totally soaking the saddle in oil for an hour and then going for ...


4

It may take some mileage to truly "break-in" a Brooks saddle, at which point it will be "perfect" for many folks. However, when it is new it should not be horrifically uncomfortable or even significantly more uncomfortable than a decent quality saddle from other vendors. You know when the Brooks is broken-in when you can see the indentations of your sit ...


3

Use Proofide! Ride in light rain! (the saddles molds to you much better when lightly wet - but not soaked) Use padded bike lycras (so you can have less pain in the beginning)! All these methods worked for me very fine. Even so, it took me about four months to really get it on its final shape.


3

I have had success with this method and no problems with cracking or saddle damage. I soak a new Brooks saddle in neatsfoot oil for a day and in a bucket of water for a day then ride it wet. After a 20 mile or so ride you will be amazed how comfortable the saddle will feel. I then use Proofide and tension the saddle as Brooks recommends. I have two B-17 ...


2

I use the Brooks Proofride and apparently, you can use it on the underside of the saddle to help break it in. I found that mine was really comfortable after about 7 months of daily use. That or my bum got broken in!


2

You usually can only lace a leather saddle when it becomes sunken in the middle. Lacing the bottom across underneath will tighten up the sagging middle. This wouldn't likely be a "do it yourself" project without the proper tools/equipment. From your description, it sounds as if you're sitting on the saddle off to one side. I'm not sure this could be ...


2

For the bottom and shaved edges I use beeswax. Beeswax prevents absorption of moisture, air and dirt but sits on the surface of the leather. Proofhide, while providing some waterproofing, penetrates the leather causing it to expand and stretch. Brooks recommends it only be used on the finished side. I live in Hilo, HI, the rainiest city in the US. This, ...


2

I guess shoe polish (the creamy one, not fancier new ones with sylicone and lots of synthetic polymers) at least won't do any harm, but maybe there are better choices. Manufacturers advise the use of specific products (Brooks Proofide, for example) both for treating the surface against wear and tear induced by friction and the elements, but also for ...


1

Shoe Polish is ok but it is going to smell and plus the seat will not soak it properly and leave traces on your pants. I use a glove oil... You can find one in any sports shop ... just look for oil which is used to soften the Baseball gloves. I have used it on my Brooks leather saddle and have had no issues in last 2 years.


1

I purchased a Brooks B-17 this year. I used their Proofide on the saddle as suggested. A light coating on the top, work it in, and buff it into the leather, and a coating on the under side of the saddle to protect from possible water flying up underneath from water off of the rear tire. This "under-coating" is only applied one time, and has little to do with ...



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