Hot answers tagged

18

There is some interesting research here (pp 56-60), in amongst some decent comparisons of methodologies, they suggest that reflective material on the major joints makes the real difference in having cyclists being identifiable and identified. The thinking, as I understand it, is that lights are just lights and could be on (more or less) anything but ...


14

I'd recommend learning to do arm signals. Arm signals don't run out of batteries, and are plenty visible in most cases. They're certainly bigger than the turn signal lights you could put on a bicycle (which as Moz points out in a comment, makes distinguishing the 2 turn signals a possible issue), and the distance you need to see a bike turning is a lot ...


10

Because the items are going to have to remain in close proximity, it's unlikely that there is anything that will completely solve your problem, but there are a couple of things you can try. If the lights are wired, it is possible that the wire is working as an antenna, and you can use a Ferrite Choke or two on the wire. Tape one near where the wire ...


9

The main things to look for when purchasing new lights: How bright are the lights? Can you see them for a few feet, a block, half a mile, etc? What is the angle of visibility of the light? It does you no good if you can only see the light from one single point - you want to be sure your light can be seen from a wide range of angles, especially for your ...


8

The Bicycles Stack Exchange Blog now has the most comprehensive bike taillight review on the internet (to our knowledge): Review of the Best Bicycle Tail Lights in 2012 In total I reviewed fifteen different tail lights. The Cygolite Hotshot performed best in the most categories, but there are several other lights which did quite well. If you're looking for ...


7

I don't believe these are "better" or "worse" than other lights, rather they are a supplement to other lighting systems. I think the inventors' claims about forward and rear illumination are somewhat questionable as it won't compare to a real head/taillight of similar cost. However, I think they would provide some improvements in side and off-angle ...


7

Yes, with easy to spot 'caveats'... On 'Critical Mass' bike rides there are all kinds of imaginative lighting setups that give individual riders individuality. We like creativity in cycling and how everyone is different. Undoubtedly these lights are cool and would be fab on a Critical Mass ride. Therefore, for that reason 'yes'. Caveats... LED lights are ...


6

I buy all my bike lights from http://www.dealextreme.com - they are in HongKong but have free postage to Canada. You are just buying the same made in China stuff in the shops direct from the makers in China. Avoid the very cheapest stuff (destined for a Dollar store near you!) and check the reviews. edit: specifically for your trailer you can't beat this ...


6

USB rechargeable lights are not typically designed to be run off of USB power continuously, they're only designed to be charged over USB. I run The Bike Light Database, and have tested dozens of different USB rechargeable lights. A few models will run while plugged in, but typically do not charge if turned on, and only run at the lowest output setting. If ...


6

Get a box to put them in, remove the batteries or get something else. The NiteRider UltraFazer 3.0 LED (available at Wiggle) has the lock-out switch to prevent accidental turning ons. This is a relatively rare feature which is crazy given that lights are invariably carried in bags. Although that is a new feature to the model. You can send them back for a ...


6

I have actually dramatically improved the cutoff on my 1200 lumen dual LED (just for reference) with a sort of brim made out of aluminium plate. On road I run it on minimum brightness (guessing about 1/4 -- 1/3 power). On pitch dark bike paths I do change the angle a little as well as turning up the brightness. Super-speedy sketch (go inkscape!): The ...


5

Peter White has done a lot of testing of dynamo headlights and has even put together comparisons of luminance. I have the Schmidt Edelux and love it.


5

I have 3M reflective tape on my cranks too. These should be pretty visible, and the motion would clearly indicate that I am a bicycle, not a car.


5

I think the biggest advantage of EL wire is that it would increase your side visibility. Front and real lights aren't that great for that. On my folder, I have wheel lights installed - with the small wheels on the folder, they make a very distinct pattern, very noticeable to drivers that are otherwise likely to T-bone me.


4

OK, so: I called Queensland Transport, who put me through to main roads I then called main roads back (since the first call got disconnected). They told me to call my local main roads office, as their central number doesn't answer questions about compliance. I called the local main roads office. The inspector there told me this was an issue of legislation ...


4

If you do not want to kludge your existing headlight, Busch und Mueller Headlights always have a low beam feature, which they especially advertise. Here is their current catalogue. http://www.bumm.de/fileadmin/user_upload/Katalog/B_M__Catalogue_2014_15__English.pdf


3

I don't know about strip lighting, but can help with side lighting: REI ships to Canada, and they sell spoke lights. While they don't satisfy your requirement for rechargeable batteries, they are easy to install, come in Amber, and are waterproof. These aren't as bright as, say, a Planet Bike Superflash -- which REI also sells -- but the motion of the ...


3

Reasonable cost could mean a problem depending on your budget, because a good LED light for dynamo-hubs should not be cheap. My suggestions, based on what I've seen (at night, during some randonneur events) are: From Busch & Müller, the IXON models. Their light is obscenely strong, reaching 100m+ with a good cutoff, thus without annoying other riders ...


3

The motion of the light is what does the work, the colour is less important as long as its bright. A valve light will describe a "flattened corkscrew" through the air and is obviously different to any other vehicle on the road - which means you get perceived by driver's conscious brains not just their subconscious or autonomous brains. These things are ...


3

Sorry no idea what the el wire looks like. As a driver the best features especially in town are flashing LEDs front and rear, reflective ankle bands (these work from any angle) and relflectors attached to the bike wheels. If you have never driven, do remember that just because you can see the car does not mean the car driver can see you. Car drivers are ...


3

A hub dynamo is typically rated at 6V/500mA, and most lights will use all of that. Modern LEDs give you a lot more light from that power, but it's still nowhere near as much as the high powered battery lights you can buy (so if the manufacturers could get more power into the lights they would probably offer it as an option). So the extra power you're ...


3

Learn to look back while riding straight. That is much more important than making any signal. Also the movement of the head is usually a good indication to the driver behind of what your intentions are.


3

Suggested compromise: Hand signals, but wear reflective material on your arms to make those signals more visible.


3

Going fast on unlit roads you definitely want a decent light. Personally I find the combination of my 100 lumen dyno headlight plus another 100 lumens on the handlebars to be enough, but I ride relatively slowly and on a manoeuvrable bike. On a faster bike with handling and brakes designed for speed you want more. Perhaps not 2000 lumens - that's off road ...


3

As a Revo Lights owner I like them a lot as a second light source. Since the light is lower to the ground they do a better job of lighting up the pavement immediately in front of you. For being seen, they're much more visible than many of the headlights and tail lights I see on other bikes out at night. Especially from the side, when you're at a stop sign ...


2

You could take the battery out?


2

After reading the journal article @Unsliced linked I think the answer is undoubtedly yes. Also interestingly, it's good to learn that the benefit of fluorescent, non-reflective material is apparently little more than wearing all black once the sun sets. I'll add my 2c: IMO the best luminescence-for-the-buck is the "ansi class 2 vest" - i.e. construction ...


2

I think turn signals on bicycle are a silly idea. As a motorcycle rider, I know that cars ignore turn signals. Motorbikes and bicycles are invisible to cars. On my bicycle, I do my hand signals (especially the left turns in the USA where I'm crossing against traffic) in conjunction with looking back and making eye-contact with whatever homicidal cager is ...


2

Certainly you should at least have wheel reflectors if you ride on roads at night. Most auto/bike accidents are not due to "overtaking" but occur at intersections and driveways, so side visibility is important. And some sort of light or reflector on the wheels is much more effective than on the fixed part of the bike, since the motion gets your attention ...


2

You most probably damaged the rear light and are risking damage the voltage regulator on the front, too, since the huge majority of generator hubs provides 6 Volts. If the regulator on the front is sophisticated enough, perhaps it is using just enough current and voltage to feed the light, but I think most circuits use a Zener diode, that actually make the ...



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