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1

I always turn on my headlights even in the daytime for safety reasons, whether driving a car or riding a bike or motorcycle. Many times I have tried to change lanes when visibility was limited and had to correct back into my lane because what I thought was a clear lane was actually occupied by a very hard to see vehicle coming up from my blind spot. Many ...


7

You should use lights in fog. On a car, you don't use high beams in fog (but you're supposed to use low beams (required) and fog lights (optional, but useful since they cast a low and wide beam which increases visibility) since they reflect back too much, but on a bicycle, your lights aren't that powerful for this to be a problem (and the distance they cover ...


16

I definitely recommend this. Running lights will make you more readily visible as the light will penetrate the fog to an extent. Reflectors and high-viz clothing will be somewhat less effective during foggy conditions. Use caution riding in foggy conditions as drivers may not see you until they are very close.


5

Many people run lights on a clear day for safety. In the US by law a motorcycle must run lights all the time. Law was based on safety. This is a related post Does it make you safer to use lights during the day Cars turn their lights on in the fog. Another answer was criticized for stating this is a no-brainier. But it is. As for high beam versus low ...


3

I subscribe to the theory of "don't force the other person to make a decision". In a car an example is to not stay in someone's blind spot as they are about to change lanes. That way they don't have to decide whether to speed up or slow down to get over. On a bike, that means to communicate your intentions and provide one obvious path for the driver to ...


0

I try to wave cars through when I know that it is safe, there is enough room for them to get through. So I think that it is perfectly good practice but you have to think about the size of the vehicle and if it will get around you.


0

Never ever run a red light even if it is safe to go. It is also an offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 section 36 (In the UK).


0

I think that technically you're supposed to walk across but I make a decision on how busy the intersection is. If there are plenty of pedestrians, I get off. That's pretty rare where I live in western Massachusetts. Most of the time, I ride through.


3

Never. I drive a school bus (and ride a bike, of course - but never at the same time) and when bicyclists wave me through, I ignore them. There is no way that they can truly judge the space that I need without running into an oncoming car or them. Same goes for when I'm in my car. I trust my own judgment. If it means that I am driving behind them for a ...


1

I found that at least here in Germany, most drivers are confused by trying to wave them by. Same goes for drivers in oncoming traffic that want to go left (across my lane) that I try to wave across when my traffic lights turn red. My strategy is taking "primary position" or even closer to the middle line when overtaking is either not a good idea or if there ...


0

This answer largely duplicates my answer to a similar question: The short answer is "No, it's likely that there is nothing you can do to hold building management liable for the theft of your bike." I am neither a lawyer nor a resident of Australia where it seems this happened, so this longer answer is to the best of my layman's understanding and you should ...


3

If you are insured make an insurance claim and they will follow up on any legal liability someone else might have, but you get a replacement bike quickly. If you are not insured, you are in a lose/lose and maybe lose some more situation. You can accept that your bike got stolen and get on with life. Or you could sue a large property investment company and ...



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