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1

Cost would have to be the biggest obstacle. Several hundred dollars to retrofit a system, assuming it is impeccably reliable, might be an insignificant expense to someone riding a $7,000 titanium custom bike, but it's an insurmountable sum for someone riding a Craigslist beater bike because it's what they can afford. For new bikes, let's presume that mass ...


1

Apart from the complexity already described, it's arguable that bikes are almost always going slower than cars, who seem to be the main following vehicle intended to notice brake lights. A car seeing a cyclist ahead will almost always need to slow down or overtake. If the cyclist is braking they just need to do so a little sooner. Coupled with being able to ...


3

It's not common in Europe either, but it's getting less rare it seems like. A quick browse in one of the larger German online stores (Rose) shows that several of the larger bike light makers (Busch & Müller, Axa ...) now sell dynamo-powered rear lights with brake light functionality. All lights work in the same manner : They are fed rectified but not ...


2

Bicycle rarely use harsh braking, even if you have enough braking power, you wouldn't use it because you probably know how easy it would be to come off the bike using harsh braking. So the benefit of a signal saying: "Hey I'm stopping, u better brake and be ready to stop" is minimised. As a motorist, I noticed that cyclist rarely ride in the middle of the ...


5

Summary: it's hard to make a light that reliably turns on only when the brakes are used. Most cyclists who want brake lights buy rear flashing lights because they're cheap and ubiquitous. Ignoring cost, to work well a brake light on the back of a bike would need to be paired with a constantly on, non-flashing light, purely so that people who saw it would ...


-1

What do you mean "It's not always obvious when the vehicle ahead of you is slowing down". Cars have brake lights. For bike to bike communication you say slowing or stopping and hold your left hand in a down position. For bike to car the car is typically going faster. Here is my flashing light - I am a bike - please don't run over me. Car to car they ...


2

I suspect you will find 800 lumen to be plenty, even for avoiding debris on unlit roads. For context, I commute in the dark (and often in the rain) along unlit back roads and along our regional trail system which is unlit double track gravel with forest coverage. I often need to avoid fallen branches, rabbits and the odd deer that pops out of the trees at ...


0

I got a Niterider Lumina 700 for about $100 on Amazon. It's plenty bright for commuting (most of the time I don't even use the high setting) on unlit roads, it throws a pretty wide beam, and the light is very white. It's rechargeable through USB which is awesome, so I charge it up at work when I see the indication that it's getting low.


0

I run a 200 lumen headlamp that claims 175 hours out of 4 AAs and cost roughly $100. In the wide mode (outside spread LEDs) it produces more than enough light to be seen with and I can see with it fairly well. When I need more light, I can cut over to the big beam and see as much as I need to. I bought it mainly for racing, but the battery life was so ...


1

MTBR.com does a big review of lights every year; here is the one for 2015. They have a ton of useful information.


3

Going fast on unlit roads you definitely want a decent light. Personally I find the combination of my 100 lumen dyno headlight plus another 100 lumens on the handlebars to be enough, but I ride relatively slowly and on a manoeuvrable bike. On a faster bike with handling and brakes designed for speed you want more. Perhaps not 2000 lumens - that's off road ...



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