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1

Two bikes locked together with a D lock aren't the sort of thing a thief would like to be seen carrying. A cable lock to a solid object such as a car is a good backup. For securing kayaks, rather thin cables are sold that can be shut in the car doors and either padlocked inside the car or trapped in the doors. With a rear carrier, the towing eye can ...


5

I used to take the family bikes over to western Europe and never had a problem leaving them overnight. This would have been maybe USD3000s worth of bikes at various places in France, Germany and Benelux. First of all I was able to lock the rack onto the car - it was a pretty Mickey-Mouse lock but would nevertheless deter an opportunist thief. Next I would ...


-1

I redesigned an Electric cattle prod, fitted it under my seat, wired it to the bike frame. It is remotely armed and at discharge it releases 70000 volts at 4 amps. It is very effective. It has already knocked one person out and stunned another when they tried to steal my bike. I still use a normal $30 lock and don't arm the shocker in safe places but if I am ...


1

The challenge is to prevent the lock from being cut or pried open. Standard steel locks do this by using a steel bar, cable, or chain that resists bolt cutters and abrasive wheels due simply to the strength and hardness of the steel. However, one can also prevent the lock from being cut by "frustrating" the cutting process somehow. For instance, a cable ...


4

There isn't all that much point. We have a lot of knowledge on how to make steel tough. It's also pretty cheap. This basically makes it win-win for manufacturers: use enough tough steel in a good structure with a good locking mechanism to get a decent lock. It doesn't cost a lot and its easy to fabricate. The weight of many good locks is not that much to ...



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