Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

Most sources I've read suggest that your body can process at most 300 calories per hour during exercise. And a lot of sources suggest that you only attempt to replace roughly 200 calories per hour at best. You should be able to do this easily without any simple sugars. Your initial budget is much much larger than 1500 calories, you don't need to do a one for ...


18

This happens to runners more than bikers but is the same thing you describe... friction. I've done band-aids, tape and even special products (Nipguards) made for covering just the nipple area but the best remedy I've found is compression clothing. Even in the middle of summer, I will wear some skin tight Under Armour shirt. Heat Gear (odd naming, but ...


10

Don't be afraid to get off the bike. Take a break every hour or so. Shake out your legs, shake out your arms. Stetch your muscles. When on the bike, try to remember to switch hand positions often set a timer on your watch every 10 minutes if you have to to remind you to switch things up a bit. Eat before you are hungry, at regular intervals. Don't ...


9

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


8

I have had this problem when running (it's known as jogger's nipple). It's caused by friction when your top rubs against your nipples, moisture from sweat (or rain) tends to make it worse. Wearing technical clothing that draws moisture away from your skin will help, along with some kind of barrier cream. Personally, I use bodyglide as I find it easy to ...


7

Unfortunately, I don't feel able to talk about food QUALITY, since even "vegan" can mean a lot of things these days, and this understanding varies from person to person. Just to illustrate, I'm not sure to suggest cheese, honey, milk and eggs, although I do find these to be excellent heavy-fuels for cycling. Now what I do feel sure to advise, being an ...


7

You don't mention where you get your calories burn/hour rate, but 800 cal/hour is a very fast ride. 800 cal/hour would be around 220 watts, and that's a lot for 6 hours. When you are riding, some of your energy is coming from carbohydrate metabolism, and some is coming from fat metabolism. The ratio between the two depends upon how hard you are riding, your ...


7

I'm in the do it this year camp. In comments you say you can currently ride probably a painful 60 (miles). In general, a conservative plan is to extend your ride distances by 10% per week. But it's important to realize that marathon and iron man athletes do not train by running a marathon each week. The aim of their training is to build deep core fitness ...


6

If you ride further or faster than you're used to, then some weariness in the legs is normal and should pass within a couple of days. I rode my biggest ride to date a couple of weeks ago and when I got home I nearly lost my balance walking around the house as my legs were a bit weaker than I expected. With a couple of days rest they were back to normal, ...


6

Perhaps a little late (sorry, I was on a week-long bike trip), but: You're missing sun lotion. You definitely need it and should apply it first thing in the morning, since you will likely be reluctant to stop to apply it later. Despite what the others have said, I've never had a problem wearing the same cycling shorts 2-3 days in a row. I do use chamois ...


6

Out on the road its a mixture. But first, are you able to measure your cadence? I use this as my guide (i.e. I try and keep my cadence within a certain range no matter what the gradient) - if I am able to pedal comfortably at over 80rpm, then its time to change to a bigger gear. If I'm unable to pedal comfortably at 65rpm, its time to go to a smaller gear. ...


6

100 RPM minus your age. (Only half kidding.) 80-90 RPM is a good target for younger, fairly serious bikers. When I was in my 20s-30s I could do that for several hours. As I get older (I'm 63) I find it harder -- 70 RPM is probably closer to my "optimal" speed now, and I drift down toward 60 if I don't keep at it. One rule I tell folks that I think is ...


6

Short answer: you won't stay dry. Your best option is to maintain comfortable body temperature. Longer answer: What to wear depends how cold it is, how hard it's raining, and whether your bike is equipped with fenders. In the Pacific Northwe't, we have a lot of light rain and a moderate temperature band. I keep the fenders on year-round (which makes me ...


6

To answer your question directly, you certainly can use clipless over long distances. However, scientific studies have actually shown that clipless pedals offer no discernible performance advantages over long distances. They have shown that a small advantage can be gained on sprints, but that's about it. That said, many cyclists do report increased ...


5

Adding to the Supurb answer by @kibbee The second day you may find the start hard - muscles are a bit tied and sore. Legs are not working like the did at the start of the first day etc, they are stiff and sore.... When it's a training schedule, you (well me anyway) would normally say "Best to rest and recover" - so it's not something you will have dealt ...


5

"Nothing is so broken you cannot make it worse" - breaking a perfectly good chain in the field, miles from nowhere, with a light weight emergency tool, would be my very last resort. This will only work if the broken end is not too frayed. Remove the cable completely from the outers and the shifter. Thread the cable though the barrel adjuster on the ...


4

Great answer from James, let me just add a really quick tip. Before you go and read 1000 articles about riding position, just try the following: Raise the saddle a tiny bit. Most people ride way too low, and that just leads to knee problems if you start riding greater distances. I know it made a huge difference for me. Increase the cadence so you never ...


4

Most of your chamois creams/"butt butters", such as Paceline's "Chamois Butt`r", are fairly conventional combos of standard skin cream ingredients, with a heavy emphasis on lanolin. I've never tried petrolatum (though many swear by it), and I'm a bit skeptical as to how it would fare compared to the more skin-cream-like concoctions. Plus it would make more ...


4

I don't think it would be convenient or practical to use any kind of stove or hotplate while you are actually riding. If you are carrying a backpack or have things on a rack a propane backpacking stove can be very fast for creating a hot meal on a break. To cook/warm while you are actually riding I think your best bet would be to use a Flameless Ration ...


4

Optimum efficiency is usually quoted as being somewhere above 80rpm which is usually a good deal faster than most people spin. http://adventure.howstuffworks.com/outdoor-activities/triathlons/training/cycling-cadence1.htm


4

I wouldn't wear the same cycling shorts 2 days in a row if you're not going to be able to wash/dry them. I'd take an extra pair of padded cycling shorts. You don't want your bits feeling funky. Throw in some chamoise cream (even if you just get a couple single use packets of it, it will help avoid chaffing). Same with the shirt, probably want a fresh ...


4

The terms "performance bike" and "endurance bike" aren't very well defined. To many people, the term "endurance bike" describes touring bicycles, which are used for long-distance self-supported rides where you're carrying a lot of equipment and supplies. However, Fuji (which you referred to), uses the term "endurance bike" to mean a road bike with a more ...


4

Aside from what the others have said here (with details on how to use clipless pedals), your original question was can you ride long distances in them. That is one of the things they are designed for. By keeping your foot exactly placed on the pedal, they maximize your pedaling efficiency. You foot never falls off the pedal. I rode over 3,000 miles last ...


4

Long slow distance is great for building up a strong aerobic base (circulatory and respiratory systems), if you have the time. However, unless you choose good rides it can be boring and few people would consider doing it on an indoor trainer. For those who don't have that time, there's a century training plan in Chris Carmichael's Time-Crunched Cyclist and ...


4

According to an Australian Institute of Sport article about Eating before exercise: Exercising in a fasted state (8 hours since the last meal) results in a greater proportion of fat being used as the exercise fuel compared to doing the same workload after a carbohydrate-containing meal or snack. However, it is possible that you may be able to exercise ...


4

Let me expand on the answer provided by @Mac. There are two important concepts here that need to be unpacked, 1) endurance training when in a fasted state and 2) eating either before or during an endurance training ride. If your goal is improved fat metabolism, endurance training in a fasted state (e.g., 8 hours without food, no eating during exercise) ...


4

Since the RAW is long term goal, you are talking about a long term training plan. You must enjoy it, and you must not burn out - in other words you need to incorporate training as part of a sustainable lifestyle. During the weekdays you will need to some training but probably don't have much time, it is an opportunity to do high intensity training, core ...


3

You should probably bring some tools along in case you need to do some minor repairs. A multi-tool (or separate tools) with allen keys, a chain tool, and a spoke wrench would probable be quite useful, and wouldn't weight you down too much. I'd probably pack at least 2 tubes, because a single incident could result in 2 un-patchable tubes. Plus it's easier to ...


3

You can absolutely ride long distances in clipless pedals. There are countless examples of this - at the extreme, look at any picture of a Race Across America participant, there is a very strong chance are they will be using clipless pedals of some kind (RAAM being a 4800km race, completed solo in less than 8 days by the winners..) Clipless pedals are ...


3

I would suggest your frame may be a bit small for you. I'm slightly shorter than you and I have a Scultura 906 in a 54 cm frame (size on the frame sticker says S/M). The longer stem may assist, however it may put you in a more race position which could lead to the neck pain. As for the calf cramps this could be a couple of things; 1) seat height too low, 2) ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible