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5

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been real helpful to me in think about saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support you "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


4

If your goal is comfort over speed, I would emphasize in three upgrades which don't break your bank: Find a comfortable saddle. Go to your LBS and ask their opinions. A lot of people suggest leather saddles, like Brooks or Selle Anatomica. A good saddle is expensive, but it is a worth upgrade and you will be surprised how big the difference is between a ...


2

There is such a range of answers. A lock mounted to the bike is going to be more comfortable. A decent light ulock is going to be 1.5 lbs. A cable lock is going to be more like 0.5 lbs, but not as strong. But, for a quick in and out it that may be the best trade off. The weight of the bike plus the weight of the lock to protect the bike is ...


2

There is a lot of good advice in Vincent's answer. I'd reprioritize a bit: Make sure the bike is fitting you well – on the weekend ride maybe 16 or 20 miles in one go. See how you feel, especially note where you notice the extra distance. The consult with your LBS about how to improve your comfort on the bike – this will pay off on all of your rides. If ...


1

The jump from an 8 mile ride to 50 miles is quite a bit. I think rather than spending money on the bike, you first need to spend money on clothing and accessories. Padded bicycle shorts will make you more comfortable on these longer rides, as will cycling gloves, and a cycling jersey. Additionally, the jersey has pockets to carry food, phone, and small ...


1

The top four changes you could make that will impact comfort are: Tires Clipless pedals/shoes Handlebars Saddle Tires will change the ride more than anything else, including changing the actual frame of the bike. The stock tires on your bike are very durable but also very stiff and harsh riding. They feature thick casings and steel beads to hold the tire ...


1

From the best bang for the buck to the worst. Clipless pedals. Something simple like Shimano SPD. You can even have a dual mode pedal like Shimano A-530. Good quality lighter or stronger tires (depending on what kind of road you intend to ride). It changes the bike. Higher quality wheels. Again, lighter rims for acceleration/climbing and heavier for flat ...


1

If the area doesn't look very "lively", sometimes I just leave my rig outside a shop. My little trick though is I put my bike into some nasty gear, like either the fastest one or smallest/smallest ring combo, so the chain hangs loose. Or even I tune my front derailleur in a way allowing me to get the chain completely off the front chainring (in a way which ...


1

I have had similar issues with numb feeling in my toes. Have tried my cleats in every possible position but it did not help. My local bicycle shop owner suggested some arch supports, he thought it had to do do with me having quite an high arch that pressing it down that much interrupted the blood flow. Since I have arch supports I have not had any numb toes ...


1

There is probably a combination of things that can help. Periodically getting your weight off can help as can making sure your pedaling stroke includes ankle flexion. In my experience, that helps a lot with circulation in my feet. Obviously, you'll want to make sure your shoes are not laced or velcro-ed too tight. I will often stand in the pedals and do ...



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