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Most sources I've read suggest that your body can process at most 300 calories per hour during exercise. And a lot of sources suggest that you only attempt to replace roughly 200 calories per hour at best. You should be able to do this easily without any simple sugars. Your initial budget is much much larger than 1500 calories, you don't need to do a one for ...


8

Do I need to put myself through easier challenges/trainings before I embark on my planned trip? That depends. What is the farthest you've cycled in one go before now? I suggest you skip your next gym visit and go for a 10 mile cycle. If that works out, take a 20 mile cycle the next time. What food and equipment do I need? A spare tube, tyre, ...


7

I'm in the do it this year camp. In comments you say you can currently ride probably a painful 60 (miles). In general, a conservative plan is to extend your ride distances by 10% per week. But it's important to realize that marathon and iron man athletes do not train by running a marathon each week. The aim of their training is to build deep core fitness ...


7

You don't mention where you get your calories burn/hour rate, but 800 cal/hour is a very fast ride. 800 cal/hour would be around 220 watts, and that's a lot for 6 hours. When you are riding, some of your energy is coming from carbohydrate metabolism, and some is coming from fat metabolism. The ratio between the two depends upon how hard you are riding, your ...


6

If you ride further or faster than you're used to, then some weariness in the legs is normal and should pass within a couple of days. I rode my biggest ride to date a couple of weeks ago and when I got home I nearly lost my balance walking around the house as my legs were a bit weaker than I expected. With a couple of days rest they were back to normal, ...


5

"Nothing is so broken you cannot make it worse" - breaking a perfectly good chain in the field, miles from nowhere, with a light weight emergency tool, would be my very last resort. This will only work if the broken end is not too frayed. Remove the cable completely from the outers and the shifter. Thread the cable though the barrel adjuster on the ...


4

Great answer from James, let me just add a really quick tip. Before you go and read 1000 articles about riding position, just try the following: Raise the saddle a tiny bit. Most people ride way too low, and that just leads to knee problems if you start riding greater distances. I know it made a huge difference for me. Increase the cadence so you never ...


4

Let me expand on the answer provided by @Mac. There are two important concepts here that need to be unpacked, 1) endurance training when in a fasted state and 2) eating either before or during an endurance training ride. If your goal is improved fat metabolism, endurance training in a fasted state (e.g., 8 hours without food, no eating during exercise) ...


4

According to an Australian Institute of Sport article about Eating before exercise: Exercising in a fasted state (8 hours since the last meal) results in a greater proportion of fat being used as the exercise fuel compared to doing the same workload after a carbohydrate-containing meal or snack. However, it is possible that you may be able to exercise ...


4

Long slow distance is great for building up a strong aerobic base (circulatory and respiratory systems), if you have the time. However, unless you choose good rides it can be boring and few people would consider doing it on an indoor trainer. For those who don't have that time, there's a century training plan in Chris Carmichael's Time-Crunched Cyclist and ...


4

Since the RAW is long term goal, you are talking about a long term training plan. You must enjoy it, and you must not burn out - in other words you need to incorporate training as part of a sustainable lifestyle. During the weekdays you will need to some training but probably don't have much time, it is an opportunity to do high intensity training, core ...


3

I think your greatest challenge will be keeping to only 10 miles (16 km) per day. You do not mention any cycling experience your fitness level if you have a bike if you expect to camp if you will cycle on roads what you intend to spend. A person in normal good health could expect, with a little training, to ride 20 miles (32 km) before lunch and the ...


3

I took part in a charity ride from Scotland to Italy in June last year, and that was made a lot easier with the use of a support team to help carry everything. Since you are going it alone, you need to consider quite a lot of things: Directions It's fine planning a route, but they often don't go to plan. Always be prepared to make alterations at the last ...


3

I would suggest splitting the weight in half and putting it low on your bike for stability. Here is my daily commuting configuration (2 matched 6 gallon plastic waste baskets mounted by hose clamps to a standard bike rack.) (Your emptied backpack could be rolled up and placed on top if you need it for off-bike use.)


3

I have done 120 mile touring and it was over either 2 days or 3 days. The easy estimate is 10 miles per hour for a bike ride. You can easily ride 50 miles in one day. With a distance of 169 miles, you should take around 4 days. Sometimes, the average speed is closer to 15 miles per hour. Also, you may take more or less time per day. I used both ...


3

I would suggest your frame may be a bit small for you. I'm slightly shorter than you and I have a Scultura 906 in a 54 cm frame (size on the frame sticker says S/M). The longer stem may assist, however it may put you in a more race position which could lead to the neck pain. As for the calf cramps this could be a couple of things; 1) seat height too low, 2) ...


2

In my experience, eating any form of sugary food greatly increases the chances of a debilitating 'hunger knock' - all the more so if used to bridge times when your reserves are low. For me, sugar plays no part in any endurance diet. Reward, however, is another matter. Where I used to take a couple of (say) mars bars on every road trip, nowadays I take only ...


2

No. The Tour De France currently has an average speed of about 40km/h, fasted speeds are a team time trial, about 58km/h over 25km. (Wikipedia), average cyclist would be with 1/2 those speeds, average person probably half again. These speeds, while impressive, are well below what I would consider "highway speeds", and the bikes they rode , while expensive ...


2

Why do you want to try and do this without sugar? Sugar isn't dangerous for you if your body is using the energy. I would also question the difference between getting sugar from fruit vs getting sugar from a protein bar. If you want high calorie/sugar intake from fruit, try to look for fruits that are higher in sugar/calories such as mango. You might ...


2

I broke a front derailleur cable at the top of a long climb once, leaving my chain stuck around the little crank for the descent. Luckily, I was able to find a small, flat-ish rock on the side of the road that I could wedge between my frame and derailleur in order to hold the chain up on the big crank. The rock shook free once or twice on the way down the ...


2

No Science Opinion #2 By not continuing to boost your blood sugar, your boy will theoretically switch to a metabolic state that burns more fat. I have seen endurance racers do it both ways. I have seen guys that may snack a bit inbetween, but will basically just eat two or three meals during a long race and not much in between. I also have seen guys that ...


2

If you do not have a set schedule, and, in particular, you do not plan to cycle more than maybe 60 miles a day (through reasonably flat terrain) then anyone in decent shape can do a multi-day tour. You do not say how you plan to be "supported" for this trip. If you will be carrying all your own gear on the bike ("self-contained") you need a decent bike ...


2

There is more than just air friction to consider. If you extend the rack back then you would have too much weight aft and it would make the font wheel lite (it may even bring it off the ground). Vertical you don't have base size to secure and now you have weight higher. The bike would be wobbly. You are not going to have a lot of speed. I would go ...


1

You should pick up a copy of Allen Lim's cook book "The Feed Zone" the introduction explains a fair amount about exercise physiology. While on endurance pace rides don't eat anything for about the first 1.5 hours, this will train your body to efficiently burn fat. As others have said your body is burning fat in an effort like this, get your body use to ...


1

This is more of an extended comment. If you're mounting it on one side, that's likely to be quite a lot of weight off-centre, which will also affect the handling. I'd aim for vertical, but you'll need something solid underneath to support the weight - like 2/3 of another rack inverted and bolted/clamped to your rack. Alternatively you might get this to ...


1

I have done couple of 300's and learn something that maybe useful: 2 (or 3 is better) spare tubes. Multi-tool. Powerbank to charge mobile. Gloves. Pre check weather and carry rainwear. Spare batteries for head/tail lights.


1

Yes to your entire second paragraph. A good reference would be Phil Maffetone's The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing. His contention is that making the aerobic system more efficient is a healthier and more sustainable way to increase speed. I'm an ultra distance cyclist who has tried both Maffetone and Carmichael's Time-Crunched Cyclist, and I've ...


1

I’m the poster of the original question. I thought several of the answers below made good points, especially @Fred the Magic Wonderdog and @Eric Gunnerson. But none quite put it all together the way I would have liked. However, by pulling together and organizing the many good points made by different people, I’ve come up with the following answer. Unlike ...


1

If the cable breaks at the shifter and you have externally-routed cables, here's what you do: Hand-shift the bike onto a big cog on the rear by pressing on the derailleur as you spin the pedals. Tie the cable around the front cable stay on the downtube. Adjust as necessary to get the bike to hold a gear.


1

I have riden 7 Ragbrais and nener needed any sugar packets or candy bars. Assuming you have the time to stop and eat real foods and you have trained your body well you should have no problem. On Ragbrai we ride an average of 70 miles a day for 7 straight days. Longest day is a century. You do need to train to keep this up. I eat a full meal at least every ...



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