Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


6

Short answer: you won't stay dry. Your best option is to maintain comfortable body temperature. Longer answer: What to wear depends how cold it is, how hard it's raining, and whether your bike is equipped with fenders. In the Pacific Northwe't, we have a lot of light rain and a moderate temperature band. I keep the fenders on year-round (which makes me ...


6

To answer your question directly, you certainly can use clipless over long distances. However, scientific studies have actually shown that clipless pedals offer no discernible performance advantages over long distances. They have shown that a small advantage can be gained on sprints, but that's about it. That said, many cyclists do report increased ...


4

Aside from what the others have said here (with details on how to use clipless pedals), your original question was can you ride long distances in them. That is one of the things they are designed for. By keeping your foot exactly placed on the pedal, they maximize your pedaling efficiency. You foot never falls off the pedal. I rode over 3,000 miles last ...


4

The terms "performance bike" and "endurance bike" aren't very well defined. To many people, the term "endurance bike" describes touring bicycles, which are used for long-distance self-supported rides where you're carrying a lot of equipment and supplies. However, Fuji (which you referred to), uses the term "endurance bike" to mean a road bike with a more ...


3

You can absolutely ride long distances in clipless pedals. There are countless examples of this - at the extreme, look at any picture of a Race Across America participant, there is a very strong chance are they will be using clipless pedals of some kind (RAAM being a 4800km race, completed solo in less than 8 days by the winners..) Clipless pedals are ...


2

Like some of the other answerers, I have used clipless pedals over long distances. I have both Look pedals and SPD pedals, with the Look pedals, I have taken part in Audax UK events with distances of up to 400km in a 24 hour session, some of the rides being longer than this, but spread over several days. One I remember well was a 300km ride (187.5 miles) ...


2

At a minimum, for cooler weather, I'd say you need to have at least the jacket part of a "sauna suit" -- a lightweight waterproof jacket. In some situations you will appreciate the pants as well. But, as the name implies, a "sauna suit" is incredibly uncomfortable when exert yourself in it, so it's nice to have something a bit less waterproof (but better ...


2

Your answer to whether or not it is racing or endurance, it is both. You are racing, because it is against the clock. It is endurance, simply because of the distance. 30km/hour is a decent pace, and considering that you are doing an ironman distance triathlon, I would want the best performing bike possible THAT YOU ARE COMFORTABLE RIDING. It will do you no ...


2

You will want a bike for performance, but you will need endurance to finish the bike leg of an Ironman. All Ironman events will have aid stations on the bike leg so you don't need a heavy touring bike to carry panniers full of food, gear or other stuff you would take along on a very long ride. In an Ironman race you would only need to carry some food in ...


2

I finished the ACA southern tier just this last month! I'd usually be carrying bananas, sardines, peanut butter, oatmeal, knorr rice sides, whole wheat tortillas & granola bars. Less could certainly have been carried, but I'd usually go crazy at the grocery store. Most days you'll pass by a couple reasonably priced groceries so you don't actually need ...


1

The advice previously given is very good and I won't repeat that. When buying shoes, go for a comfy fit, and not a tight squeeze, and they must not flex. Make sure your cleats are aligned so that your legs will spin comfortably. To get the most, your bike and riding position also needs to be optimised. Once you get used to cycling cleats on your ...


1

If the rain is light to moderate and I'm only cycling, I'd tend to choose: a light windproof jacket: these pack down to the size of an apple, most rain will just roll off them but they're still more breathable than full water-proof fabrics, and whatever does get through won't make you cold because the jacket blocks wind chill normal cycling gear underneath ...


1

For bike touring, I've had some good luck using a rain cape, a bike specific poncho that sits over your bars and is open on the bottom. It provides a lot of ventilation and keeps a lot of the water off your legs without hot rain pants. You can pair this with some shoe covers and/or gaiters to keep your lower legs dry (or just wear shorts in hot weather and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible