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13

I would strongly advise against that. Your legs are not going to be the problem, and neither is your overall conditioning/strength. If you are going to be around other riders, you need to be able to stop and start and steer safely. Road bikes steer with your butt while MTB steer with handlebars. This is a big deal when you are tired and running on ...


11

I'm in the do it this year camp. In comments you say you can currently ride probably a painful 60 (miles). In general, a conservative plan is to extend your ride distances by 10% per week. But it's important to realize that marathon and iron man athletes do not train by running a marathon each week. The aim of their training is to build deep core fitness ...


8

Do I need to put myself through easier challenges/trainings before I embark on my planned trip? That depends. What is the farthest you've cycled in one go before now? I suggest you skip your next gym visit and go for a 10 mile cycle. If that works out, take a 20 mile cycle the next time. What food and equipment do I need? A spare tube, tyre, ...


8

No - that'd be like putting a Toyota rally driver into a F1 car, on race day. You'll be able to ride, but you won't be used to the nuances, as david1024 says, BUMSTEER. Road bikes need at least a week to get used to, and I went 500 km of riding in a month, before becoming comfortable on a road bike after being on MTBs for years. And I still go downhills ...


6

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been real helpful to me in think about saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support you "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


5

Since the RAW is long term goal, you are talking about a long term training plan. You must enjoy it, and you must not burn out - in other words you need to incorporate training as part of a sustainable lifestyle. During the weekdays you will need to some training but probably don't have much time, it is an opportunity to do high intensity training, core ...


4

If your goal is comfort over speed, I would emphasize in three upgrades which don't break your bank: Find a comfortable saddle. Go to your LBS and ask their opinions. A lot of people suggest leather saddles, like Brooks or Selle Anatomica. A good saddle is expensive, but it is a worth upgrade and you will be surprised how big the difference is between a ...


4

I think your greatest challenge will be keeping to only 10 miles (16 km) per day. You do not mention any cycling experience your fitness level if you have a bike if you expect to camp if you will cycle on roads what you intend to spend. A person in normal good health could expect, with a little training, to ride 20 miles (32 km) before lunch and the ...


4

Is the question about non-stop cycling or just riding over several days or weeks? For non-stop cycling it’s less about starvation and more about the maximum power you can get from burning body fat. For the Race Across America the record (without any food restrictions) is 27km/h average over 4860km in 7d 16h. Since stopping and sleeping is allowed (though ...


4

Answer: as far as you need to and want to. 20 miles with rest breaks should be a good starting target. I did this - my first "big" ride a year ago was 20 km total, and it completely exhausted me. A year later I'm doing a 116 km ride. The best technique is many little steps. Pick places that are ~10 miles away and do a round trip, stopping in the middle ...


4

Take it in steps. If you can do 12 miles now, think about how tired you are at the end of it. You should have a feeling whether you could just do it again, or sit and have a snack and do it again, or have lunch and do it again. Just try it. Plot a route 18-20 miles and try that. See how easy it feels, then lengthen it more. For 80-100 miles you will be ...


4

Range depends on fitness and training, of course, but the actual mileage depends on the bike, the terrain, your speed, and how many breaks you take. One way to increase your range is to put forth more effort into your ride to work by going faster. Another way is to gradually increase your distance per day. In addition to fitness and training, you can ...


4

Are you sure the weight is the real issue? Remember the weight you haul up a hill is the combined weight of the rider and bike, so cutting 15lbs off the bike will probably only be a change of around 7.5% in system weight - and you'll have a smaller choice of gears. Putting good road tyres on the MTB will make a bigger difference in energy used on the day. ...


4

I assume given the distance, that you're doing this journey on a road and on a road bike? You'll be pleased to learn that, as Criggie says, your height is pretty much irrelevant. You will need to decide between shorts and bibshorts (which come up over your shoulders). Many riders prefer bibshorts because they dispense with the line of elastic around your ...


3

Yes - numbness denotes a problem with bike fit or a thermal problem. Here's my personal experience. Fingers - riding a MTB with "ergonomic" grips, the sort with a wee wing that rests under your palm. With these I get numb fourth and fifth fingers on both hands. It takes a three hour ride to start, and if I go 4+ hours then the numbness can last into the ...


3

I have done 120 mile touring and it was over either 2 days or 3 days. The easy estimate is 10 miles per hour for a bike ride. You can easily ride 50 miles in one day. With a distance of 169 miles, you should take around 4 days. Sometimes, the average speed is closer to 15 miles per hour. Also, you may take more or less time per day. I used both ...


3

I would suggest splitting the weight in half and putting it low on your bike for stability. Here is my daily commuting configuration (2 matched 6 gallon plastic waste baskets mounted by hose clamps to a standard bike rack.) (Your emptied backpack could be rolled up and placed on top if you need it for off-bike use.)


3

I've never been a runner so I can't really comment on similarities, but certainly it is possible to experience numbness while riding. I have poor circulation anyway, and for me it usually happens on long rides in low temperatures. Warm weather rides are fine. Also note that there are various medical conditions (e.g. diabetes) which can give rise to poor ...


3

There's almost nothing height-specific in a pair of biking shorts. 335 km in two days is a lot of riding - 167 km a day is huge! You're going to be sore after that kind of ride no matter what. Can you tell us more about the injury? I'll guess for now based on my experiences. Saddle/arse pain If your problem is in the bum muscles, then its a weight and ...


3

I am a long distance rider. You don't sound unfit. A few things to look at: Diet. Eating the correct food at the correct times greatly affects your performance and recovery. Your post-ride recovery drink/ meal is as important as the ride itself and should be taking within 30min of getting off the bike. Remember you're always eating for the next day. ...


2

If you do not have a set schedule, and, in particular, you do not plan to cycle more than maybe 60 miles a day (through reasonably flat terrain) then anyone in decent shape can do a multi-day tour. You do not say how you plan to be "supported" for this trip. If you will be carrying all your own gear on the bike ("self-contained") you need a decent bike ...


2

The only numbness I have ever experienced on long rides (6+ hours) was due to poor fit or equipment failure. The endurance cyclists I known have never described anything "going numb" as a regular occurrence with distance riding. I can tell you that at the end of a very long ride (12+ hours) I am generally starting to get sore. I have not great knees, and ...


2

I went from flats to half-toe clips, which had no noticeable impact. I changed back to flats after an accident where the toe clip was upside down and snagged on something. Plus I found it fiddly to clip-in/hook-on at the lights. So back to flats... and the differences became clear. You stay on the pedal a lot better - I noticed that a bad gear change or ...


2

There is a lot of good advice in Vincent's answer. I'd reprioritize a bit: Make sure the bike is fitting you well – on the weekend ride maybe 16 or 20 miles in one go. See how you feel, especially note where you notice the extra distance. The consult with your LBS about how to improve your comfort on the bike – this will pay off on all of your rides. If ...


2

Not generally. Cyclists have points of contact - hands, feet, butt - where prolonged pressure is created. Pressure can cut off communication between nerves and the brain, making a body part or area feel numb. Something could happen with other areas, like the neck for example, if blood flow is impinged and the nerves don't receive oxygen. This is why wiggling ...


2

I've done pretty much exactly what you describe: training on a (really terrible old beat up MTB) and then using a rented road bike (totally different configuration, weight, etc.) for a century (RideLondon-Surrey 100) with no problems. I can't see how I wold have survived riding that distance (on those hills!) in my MTB. So I strongly recommend switching! ...


2

Yes, this is absolutely normal, and yes, its also trainable. Basically, from the information you have given, you have just tried to do too much too soon. You did 5000km last year which averages around 100km/wk and you have now asked your body to do 340km in the space of 4 days which is a massive leap. Since you are already able to complete a 200km ride, ...


1

The jump from an 8 mile ride to 50 miles is quite a bit. I think rather than spending money on the bike, you first need to spend money on clothing and accessories. Padded bicycle shorts will make you more comfortable on these longer rides, as will cycling gloves, and a cycling jersey. Additionally, the jersey has pockets to carry food, phone, and small ...



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