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26

There's lots of good info here, let me summarize my cleaning routine which combines many of the approaches already mentioned, and keeps the chain in good condition and appearance. This focuses on getting the chain totally clean and dry (no water, degreaser, or lube) before re-oiling it; and then on removing as much excess oil as possible. The end goal is a ...


22

Vegetable oils tend to "polymerize", that is become sticky and solid. Castor oil, for instance, is an excellent lubricant that was favored for racing autos and motorcycles for a long time. The reason it never became popular for regular cars was that it also built up a lot of sticky, cruddy goo. Racing engines are regularly torn down and rebuilt; no ...


15

Lubricate when needed. I don't think it's possible to put a mile marker on when to lube. I think most people add chain lube too often. Too much can cause debris to build up on the chain. Too little can cause unnecessary friction but you'll know pretty quickly by the looks (and possibly sound) of it if you have too little Hints: wipe your chain off ...


13

When you clean and then lube your chain ALWAYS take a towel and wipe off the excess lube. Just hold the towel on the chain and spin the crank backwards. And as mentioned above use a strap around you pants leg. A large rubber band works. A timing chip strap worn in triathlons work... those velcro watch bands work... lots of ways here. Your hands will ...


11

Clean the chain first - see this question or this question. If the chain has a master link I like to start there just so I can keep track of which links I have lubed easier. Usually you should shake up the lube, especially if it is a 'dry' or 'wax' formula. Then drip 1 or 2 drops on the rollers of each link. Lube on the outside of the chain is basically ...


10

As many cable manufacturers recommend, modern cables+housings are designed to not be lubricated. So, if you have modern cables, I'd probably avoid lubricating the cables period.


10

Wet and Dry lube are pretty much universal terms, they're not constrained to one manufacturer. Wet lube is suitable for wet conditions, dry lube is suitable for dry conditions. Wet lube is quite sticky. It will stick to your mech and is less likely to get washed off by rain. The downside, because it is sticky, it can pick up crap from the road, as those ...


9

I don't think so - they are designed to be used individually, and for a specific purpose. Like I answered to a previous question, the Wet / Dry naming of the product is a hint as to what conditions the product is designed for. Wet lube is typically more like motor or sewing machine oil, and is designed to coat the chain and protect it in wet conditions. ...


9

Personally I would go with the finish line wet as opposed to the dry. Typically I use the dry if I want something that will keep my chain looking clean as well as lubricated. From personal experience I have found that I need to reapply the dry lube more often. I will use a wet lube, sparingly mind you, for the nastier conditions. Having wasted your ...


9

As the person who made that claim, the reason is that allegedly some greases can attack the epoxies found in some carbon fiber applications, causing a breakdown of the CF structure, and causing expansion which will jam the post in place. The epoxy will otherwise not corrode, so it's not necessary for that purpose. The manufacturers also recommend you do not ...


8

You can easily find a "bicycle multitool"/"multi bicycle tool"/"bike multifunction tool" that covers all the basic essentials in one tool. There's tons of brands and models and what's most readily available may vary regionally, but common brands I've seen are: Park, Crank Brothers, Topeak, Serfas. Where? I would go to my local bicycle shop to get them, or ...


8

Likely some coarse particles get in between the chain elements and also between the parts of the derailleur and the star wheels. After you cycle for a while those particles either fall out or get crushed into finer particles and thus the noise goes away.


8

If you hear your chain squeaking you definitely need to re-lubricate it. It's also a good idea to re-lubricate after riding in wet weather since the combination of road grit and water tends to strip away the oil/wax. For more detailed recommendations, see this question: "How often should I lube my chain?"


8

Greasing your seatpost will prevent problems like this: "Removing Seat Post rusted into downtube". Don't use chain oil, grease is what you want. As whatsisname pointed out, all fasteners on your bike should be lightly greased. This is what keeps them from corroding and seizing over time, becoming a real pain to remove. If you have trouble with a ...


8

Carbon parts will cause aluminum to oxidize, as a chemical reaction which is why seat posts wind up stuck in frames. But that isn't why this is necessary. "Carbon grease" is not actually grease. It's a friction compound which increases the friction between your fancy carbon seat post and your frame. Increasing the friction allows a lower torque on the ...


8

Bring the oil to 130F or the temperature specified by the bottle. Hotter oil means thinner oil. The hot oil will penetrate your chain and when cooled again, will remain there. About all that cleaning. It's greatly exaggerated. it's a chain. it's probably cheaper to replace it than to clean. Not saying that you should not clean, but water, soap, a rag, and ...


8

The excess oil collects grit from the road, which acts as an abrasive that will wear out the chain.


8

Anti-sieze is a corrosion preventer. It is not a lubricant. Generally, using it on threaded parts is acceptable, but using it on bearing races, bearings, pressfit installation points, seatposts, handlebar stems, etc... is not a good idea. There is no hard and fast rule, but if you think about the purpose of the "lubricant" on the specific part, you should ...


8

Short answer: No, you shouldn't. Heavy oils attract too much dirt, grit and grime which will damage the useful life of your chain. You need a light lubricant which will wick it's way into the internals of the chain, rather than simply coating the external portion of the chain. A good Teflon carrier lube like the Finish Line Teflon works well, lasts a good ...


7

This is a very subjective opinion. A standard like "change your oil every 3000 miles" doesn't exist as far as I know, although here is a suggested one. I ride about 3,000-4,000 miles a year and my rule of thumb is to do the hubs every 300 - 500 miles or so, and the bottom bracket twice a year. Works out to a hub overhaul about every other month. Both of ...


7

You should absolutely grease your seatpost (unless it is carbon fiber). It won't slip around if your seatpost clamp is properly tightened. Get a thing of grease from the bike shop, like the park tool grease. Better yet, get the big tub. Then, generously apply it all over inside your seattube. When you think you have enough, add some more. Then put the ...


7

I've talked to a lot of folks about chain lube. I've met quite a few people with strong opinions, and they vary wildly. Some folks swear by paraffin wax based lubricants like the White Lightning line of lubricants. Other folks swear by oil-based lubricants like Phil's Tenacious Oil. Still others won't ride without a teflon based lubricant like Tri-Flow. ...


7

The primary purpose of chain lube is to lubricate the rollers and other internal parts of each link, not to lubricate the outside. Excess lube on the outside of the chain will get dirt stuck to it, that dirt will slowly work its way into the rollers that you're trying to protect, and dirt inside will grind away at the internal parts and wear out the chain ...


7

Park Tool recommends their own product: I used to hate gloves for anything (car, bike, whatever) until I got used to wearing them while in Iraq and Afghanistan. Originally I used the Mechanix Wear gloves and I still like them for working on my car:


7

Different lubes will have different characteristics with respect to durability - some will do better in wet or muddy environments while others may do better in dry or dusty environments. First, note that chain maintenance is a matter of religious belief. The other bike store people are correct in this case - dry lube is designed for bikes which operate ...


6

Looking at the spec of your bike it says the BB is a cartridge unit. This probably isn't serviceable -- it's designed to be replaced when worn out, so just keep riding it until it grinds or gets excessively sloppy. The hubs might be serviceable. If you ride a lot in nasty conditions, or you're aggressive with the degreaser you might want to service them. ...


6

I always wash off the degreaser, lube the chain, and then run it through all gears to get a bit of lube worked into everything. Don't need to lube the gears specifically. I think the key is to be sure to wash off all traces of the degreaser. Last thing you need is residual cleaner gunking stuff up.


6

My experience has been that the Wet / Dry naming of the product is a hint as to what conditions the product is designed for. Wet lube is typically more like motor or sewing machine oil, and is designed to coat the chain and protect it in wet conditions. Dry lube is usually a teflon lube in an evaporating or wax base, so the teflon particles stay in the ...


6

Tri-Flow works the best. Any wax or lubricant that contains wax is only somewhat useful on a brand new chain, or a chain that has been thoroughly cleaned. Wax lubricant does not work well when riding in wet conditions because a lot more road grime gets kicked up into the drive train and the wax tends to do the opposite of what is advertised. You aren't ...


6

When should I lubricate the chain? This depends a bit upon the chain lubricant that your using, how often you ride the bike, how you store the bike and what sort of weather you are riding in. As a general rule of thumb I'd think about lubricating the chain every 100km to 200km. If your chain is visibly dirty, rusty or squeaking when you ride, then you ...



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