Hot answers tagged

6

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


5

The correct tire pressure for you is typically not whats written on the tire sidewall. That's an arbitrary number determined by the marketing and legal departments at the tire manufacturer, not the engineers (usually it leads to an overinflated tire, which can damage the wheel and reduce control of the bike). You'll have to play with the pressure to get a ...


5

No, of course not. Having your bike wet and unlibricated for one day won't damage it in any way. Washing it and letting it unlubricated for long period of time will cause you some issues. But one day is not a problem...


4

The "bottom bracket" assembly is loose. It may just be that it's a one-piece "cartridge" and is rattling around in the frame, or it may be that the unit is "loose bearings" and the bearing caps need to be adjusted. Or there may have been some sort of failure of the bearings. Regardless, the whole mess will need to be disassembled to a degree, and that ...


4

Evidence, not sure. I can say I've used the Park Tool chain cleaner, which is pretty much a bath, along with Simple Green solvent for years with no problems whatsoever. It does completely remove the chain lube/grease, which is the point. When I clean the chain I want all the old lube off, along with the grit and dirt in the lube. As long as you remove ...


4

Anything is fixable given time and effort and money. You need to decide first whether the bike fits you, and will do the job. Then decide if its safe - do the brakes work right? Does it stop and go okay? Are there and thick patches of rust? Poking at any suspicious rust with a pen will show how deep it is. Consumables need checking too - depending ...


3

If you use your bike everyday, i would say you need to whack some air in every couple of weeks. If you have left it sitting for a few weeks, it will need air. Most tyres have a pressure rating on the side- find yours and use it if you can. You'll be amazed at how much faster it will feel, and its also safer in terms of handling.


3

I cannot comment on derailleurs in general, just my own experience. My retro ride is 35 years old, and in that time I've ridden it about 150,000 km. It has Campagnolo Record derailleurs, and both are fine. Shifting is still good with the downtube shifters. The parallelogram is rock solid. I cannot claim to have maintained it especially well. It's only ...


2

The DT Swiss 240s front hub is a sealed bearing hub. Service includes removing the endcaps, removing the bearing seals, regreasing the bearing cartridge, and then reversing the process. There are no special tools required. The end caps are a friction fit, and, while they are tight, they will remove by hand. If bearings are damaged, replace the entire ...


2

Spraying a bike with water doesn't actually remove all grease that exists on the chain and similar otherwise unprotected surfaces. So letting it dry off for a day is fine. Even letting it stand for weeks is fine, if it is stored in a dry place with no condensation. However the situation is different if you actually do remove all lubrication from an ...


2

I agree with Batman's answer and would add to it that weekly pressure checking may not be enough depending on your setup and riding goals. I can get away with a weekly topping off of my tubes under 28mm conti road tires that I'll run at 100psi. If it's snowing/raining/whatever and I decide to run them at 80psi, they will be too soft after a week. I ...


2

For the fiddly stuff (screws, cable ends) one of those could work. They are not very durable, but are extremely inexpensive (I got an identical box for under 1EUR). Look in the electronics (soldering equipment, wires, inexpensive speakers, PCB audio amplifiers) kind of stores.


1

You seem to have the answer embedded in your question: sideways play in the pivots worn jockey wheels The pivots seem to get worn mainly by contamination - during mountain biking. The rough terrain doesn't help the situation either. The result of worn pivots seems to be worse chain retention over rough terrain. So I would say, if you ride down the ...


1

As any others have said, nope, nothing will reeeaaallllyyy happen. The only thing you need to worry about is if the water sits for too long on parts such as your chain. Just make sure you buy proper lubricants, and NOT WD40's spray can!!!! ;) Also, if you plan to do that often, it's best to just get a cheap rag and wipe the bike down to dry off most of the ...


1

Looks to me like it is an american to square taper conversion BB, they look like this out of the frame if that is indeed what it is. If that is correct it may just need tightening, also if the BB shell hasn't been damaged you can just get replacement bearings from you LBS if just the bearings are bad. Either option is relatively inexpensive. Tool wise if ...


1

There appears to be confusion on this issue, I think the answer is here: Back tires wear out quicker than front tires. Therefore, someone wonders if they should be swapped to even out the wear. However, apparently front tire blowouts are more dangerous, so this is not a good idea (to have more worn out tires up front than back). But it is a good idea to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible