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10

Astra was the Beacon Cycle house brand, according to Sheldon. As @Blam and @Daniel R Hicks say, it's a mid-range 80s bike (that's a compliment)! The lugs, while nothing special, aren't drainpipe thick - this is a good thing. It was probably built well. Crankset may be Stronglight, and the derailleur and front mech are probably Sachs-Huret. Basic components ...


6

Don't use poison. It will likely not work. Would you be able to remove a dead spider from your bike anyway? How would you know it was dead? Poison is bad for other insects and animals in general. It's bad for you. I believe it's against the spirit of biking too. I don't think a bike cover will work for you. You will give spiders another place to hide. Even ...


3

In almost all cases when servicing a hub the bearing DO need to be replaced. You may not be able to see it without the aid of a microscope, but the bearings will be slightly pitted after any appreciable period of use. As one user points out, high grade ballbearings in case hardened steel, even grade 25s are very cheap - why cut the corner? Case hardened ...


3

Unlike car disk brakes, there is not a lot of spare "meat" on bicycle rotors. "Machining" the rotors is not really feasible. If they are worn to the point grooves are causing performance issues, the rotors should be replaced. Sanding them down evenly (without expensive machining tools) will be next to impossible to remove scoring and maintain a uniform ...


3

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, Practice, Practice. There is no magic bullet for dealing with this problem ( it's the same problem you'll have adjusting cones on a hub. ) Knowing just how loose to leave it so it's tightened correctly when you're done is something that comes with experience. This tweaking required to get it just right is one of ...


2

Not attaching it will be bad, the thing it's there to lock will loosen or tighten as you pedal. What it does depends on whether it's a left hand or right hand thread. Looking at it, it might be a right hand thread, meaning a French or Italian bottom bracket. So it will tighten up as you pedal. That's unusual and may be the reason the lockring is loose ...


2

Following on from Johnny's answer of using compressed air, how about getting one of those computer air duster cans (a bit like this one), and a water bottle holder (a metal one with some flex in it, so you can re-adjust the size of the bottle that it can hold). One like this is a great example: Then put the air duster in the water bottle holder! It's a ...


2

I've been researching the same thing. Even built my own tool of sorts by drilling two holes through a wrench and inserting drill bits to act as pegs. The wrench is about 6" long and there's no hope in hell either of the "washers" are going to come off. My experiment didn't mess up the holes but I'd say there's a good reason for 6 pins on the Mavic 670 key. ...


1

The Suntour NEX cranksets are marked as "Interchangable Chainring Design" by Suntour, while the XCM's are marked as "Full Interchangable Chainring Design". This means that you can replace the big ring on a NEX crankset, but the middle and small ring are one piece. So, if you want to replace the middle chainring, you have to buy a whole new crankset (or ...


1

If they are SRAM/Avid hydraulic brakes, you're screwed. The DOT 5.1 fluid attacks the o-ring seals, and makes constant issues. Storing the bike for a while, upside down or vertically, will also cause issues. If they are Hayes or Tektro, same deal with the the DOT 5.1. This means don't spend money on them, replace with a Shimano M596 or better. They use ...


1

Many bicycle chains use different platings for the inner and outer links. Inner links are typically plated with a nickel/Teflon surface. Outer links will only get a nickel plating. The extra Teflon coating helps the inner surface of the chain glide over the cogs on the cassette. Here is a video of the manufacture process: ...


1

I found this video, and decided to do like him. He puts some kind of extension on his power drill, and on the end he puts a tiny 1 inch steel wire wheel. He drives the wheel up and down in the seat tube for some time until the rust is gone. I tried hard but never found a wirewheel this small in my country, at least not one that would fit on an extension. ...



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