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6

We cannot tell you what size cranks you need. Perhaps someone has direct or similar experience to help you with. If not, here's my advice ... In order of preference Talk to the rehabilitation people who (I am guessing) helped with the knee replacements. Find out if they can advise you on this, or if there is a sports physiotherapist (or similar) that ...


6

Its up to personal preference at the end of the day, but a general recommendation is to replace at (or before) the 0.5% point for 11 speed and 0.75% for 10 speed or lower. You can also see if theres something in the chain manual or chain wear gauge's manual. The multiple indicators are there because some people will want to change at 0.5%, others at 0.75% ...


5

Since it's a new-to-you secondhand bike, for safety's sake as well as to deal with the sluggishness I recommend you take it to a bike shop for a complete overhaul. I'll bet you'll be astounded at the difference when they're done.


4

If there's no barrel adjuster, then you'll need one installed. Ask LBS to do that or do it yourself: Get an inline barrel adjuster and two 4mm ferrules. These are pretty cheap. Get tools to cut cable housing. Make sure there is enough shifting cable left to accomodate extra 3-4 centimeters added by adjuster. If it's too short, get a new cable. Detach cable ...


4

Every new 9 spd chain I have bought came out of the box with 0.5% wear according to the Park CC2 chain checker. I replace my chains when they start to show any wear (i.e. 0.75 %), because chains are cheap and the rest of the drive train is not. You have to be aware that just because a measuring tool has different measurements, it does not mean the tool has ...


3

My dad had this exact problem (Just one knee). My first attempt was 150mm cranks. No where near enough, but worth the $30.00 (Cheap kids bike part) as an experiment. Next I went to crank shortener. He started at equivalent of about 130mm, and is now up to 145. Since then he switched to using an electric bike - his crank shorteners moved with him to the ...


3

The most common way is to use a "Chain Wear Indicator Gauge" tool. (google for product pages). If you don't have access to (or don't want to buy) one, you can use a ruler: http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/chain-care.html


1

I think that with a well-running bike you ought to be able to do three things: The wheels ought to spin -- life each wheel in turn off the ground and set it spinning with your hand: it ought to spin and spin and spin almost without ever slowing down, almost frictionless The tires shouldn't absorb energy -- that means you don't want knobbly tires because ...


1

At a minimum lube the chain and see what is scraping. For the brakes just hold the bike up with one hand and spin the tire. Visually inspect if the rim is rubbing on the brake. Some times you can just adjust the brake and some times the wheel(s) need to be trued. Some times you have the tire rubbing on the brake. At this point need to decide if it is ...


1

First thing you can try is to disassemble and grease the bearings with the proper stuff. To do that you have to do the following: 1) Disassemble them as unscrewing the cones' contra nut and the cones themselves. 2) Wipe the old grease with something ( I am doing it with toilet paper ) 3) Wipe every individual ball of the hub. 4) After everything is clean, ...


1

can I take my (front + rear) hubs apart while it is still attached to the spokes? Yes, of course you can. is it good enough to visually inspect the hub axle, and decide whether it's safe to use based on that? Well, there's not much else you can do, so yeah, I'd call it good enough. If there's any doubt, I'd just replace the axles. any other ...


1

If you are mechanically inclined most of the adjustments are straight forward. There are many on line tutorials, Park Tools website and the often mentioned Sheldon Brown are my personal favorites. As @ Batman has stated BSO (bicycle shaped object) can be frustrating to maintain. I have serviced them and the bearings don't get any smoother when I assemble it ...


1

You still may want an inline adjuster, but if you don't have it, here's the procedure I use (I don't use one): Disconnect cable from front derailleur Shift to small ring, large cog Adjust the lower limit screw to put 1mm of clearance between chain and inner cage. Turn the lower limit screw CW 1/2 turn (pushes cage further from chain) Reattach cable and ...


1

In order to restore it, take off/disassemble the major/large parts: Fork, wheels, and cranks. Go slow here so you can put it all back together later. Give it a good degrease, wash, wax then reassemble with new grease. You don't really have to remove and tear down the hand brakes. Grease the seat post. Park tools has a good page on how those coaster ...


1

There are 2 screws you can see at right side of the brake. the bottom one is just above the pad screw - it's one that holding the cable. Open it a little. Check if the cable is going smooth (if not, you should oil the cable or even replace the cable, and maybe the housing too). Check the pads, that they are not wear, nor dried on sun. Then pull the cable ...


1

Typically, a chain uses a grease lubricant which is applied hot to the chain into every crevase of the chain before the chain is assembled. Its generally the best lube you can get on a chain, but its impossible to apply at home in the same way (contrary to sheldon brown) [aside from the fact that that particular formula is likely not sold]. Some more details ...


1

Got elixir 1 (due to low price) to replace my 12 years old Hope Mini where the rotors did not move anymore. Those things worked 11 years with just replacing pads - mostly light city riding. And the front is still working nicely. Googled for a solution to adjust the pads as they were tight on the rotor. Solution: suggested on SRAM's web page prior to ...


1

It might be better to ask how many miles does a bike last rather than how many years. I'd guess that a bike should perform well (if it's reasonably maintained) for 5,000 miles. At this point the cables are shot, the mechanical components have worn, bearings, etc. You could certainly replace all these parts and keep it going, but there is more to the question ...



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