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52

I see several reasons: Redundancy of an essential safety feature is good. If there's a problem with one brake lever you still have the other brake. Being totally unable to stop could be disastrous. Limited human hand strength. One hand can't pull the brakes as hard as two. If you need to stop really quickly this could make a difference. Separate control ...


36

Do you hear a "tick" sound every time you spin the wheel anti-clockwise? that's the freewheel mechanism composed by two small parts called "pawls" and when you spin it on that direction, those pawls turn loosely until they find the "dent" in the inner mechanism (the ratchet body), that's when the "tick" sound happens. When you ride your bike, those two ...


30

WD-40 is mostly a solvent with a very light lubricant mixed in. It's great for getting stuck parts moving again. When you spray it on, the solvent dislodges whatever gunk may be causing the part to stick and then evaporates, leaving a light lubricant behind. This will allow the previously stuck part to move again. The reason it is generally not considered ...


28

The cap keeps dirt and rocks away from the valve, particularly the fragile release mechanism. It's not the end of the world if the caps are missing, but I suggest leaving them on. They don't take that long to remove and replace.


25

Do yourself a huge favor, inflate them daily. As they are high pressure and low volume they tend to lose air quicker than that of a tube that is low pressure and high volume (MTB). With daily inflation checks you will vastly reduce the instances of pinch flats, which imo are typically the result of too low pressure. Butyl tubes, the typical tube, retain ...


24

The first rule is make sure the rear derailleur is adjusted correctly before adjusting the front derailleur. There are three adjustments that you can do on the front derailleur: Clamp Position Low limit stop High limit stop Clamp Position Here you can adjust the height of the derailleur, normally this is recommended as a 2mm clearance between the ...


23

Mostly it depends on where and how far you commute, and road conditions (sandy, snow, salt etc etc). At a minimum what I do is: Daily: check tire air pressure. Weekly: Check brake pad wear, tire wear, clean/wipe down entire bike Monthly: Check chain tension, chainring/cogs for wear, lube chain, adjust brakes, oil all pivot points on derailleurs, brakes ...


19

My bike service guys wrote a blog article along these lines. You may find it useful. The article recommends four principals for basic bike care. These are Keep your tyres pumped If it lives outside, use it. An unused bike exposed to the elements will fairly quickly rust & seize up Lubricate - little & often, less is more Check your cables and bring ...


17

A Bit More Than Basic Bicycle Maintenance for the Average Cyclist, at the How to Fix Bikes Sheldon Brown's site has articles on many aspects of bike maintenance The Park Tool website has instructions for most basic repair operations, and their handy bike map is great when you don't know a headset from a handlebar. Bicycle Tutor has videos demonstrating ...


17

Inflating daily might be a bit more work that necessary. Inflate them before every ride. From my experience with 700x25c tires at 115 PSI, I find they lose about 5 PSI after 24 hours, just due to the natural properties of the rubber. I ride a few times a week, and it's part of my standard pre-ride checklist to give each tire about 3-4 strokes on the floor ...


16

You can measure the stretch of a chain with a chain gauge (or just a ruler) Alternately - the chain links are 1 inch long, so measure 12 of them with a ruler, if they are more than 1/8inch longer than this then they are worn. You need to do this before it wears the rear cogs - it will cause the teeth to wear into sharp pointed spikes = need a new ...


16

Linking the two brakes would have a detrimental effect on braking power. Your front brake will bring your bike to a halt far quicker than your rear brake will, and should be used almost exclusively. When braking with the rear brake, your back tire won't have much weight on it, and will skid along the ground. This results in a dramatic reduction of braking ...


16

WD-40 (original) can be used as a de-greaser on bike parts. It is a bit harsher than other bike specific de-greasers, or common house hold degreasers (like Simple Green) that are often used by bike mechanics but essentially does the same thing. Keep it mind that it is NOT a lubricant, but a de-greaser. After using any de-greaser you want to wash the ...


15

The best method for handling exterior frame rust depends on how much time you'd like to invest. The difference comes down to what you use to complete the two basic steps: Remove the rust Good: Sandpaper - Cheap, but wont remove all the rust, and may leave debris. Better: Steel Wool - Will remove most of the rust, but may leave steel wool fragments, which ...


15

Here's a more complete list (excluding rod-types), arranged roughly in increasing TYPICAL stopping power, with pictures: Coaster/Drum/Hub Include 'Back-Pedal' Brake Generally not verypowerful Very low heat produced for extended periods of braking, used in freight bicycles for example Isolated from the external environment (rain, mud, etc.) Very low ...


14

Nobody has noted this yet, so maybe I'm particularly clumsy. The caps prevent you from bending the somewhat delicate presta valve stem if, like me, you're fitting a fairly beefy lock between your spokes every day. I smacked mine pretty good after a groggy morning commute, and it bent the valve stem pretty severely. They're somewhat known for snapping off ...


14

Wash it. Dry thoroughly. You can even wax it if you truly love your ride... Lube the chain Lubricate all pivot points (derailleurs, brake handles, etc) Loosen the tension on the cables and put a small amount of grease on the cable ends. If the hubs haven't been overhauled in a while you can do that. Remove the seatpost and if metal apply a light coat of ...


14

I think the answer he was looking for was how they adjust as the pads get worn. There is a check valve in the master cylinder, that will allow enough fluid from the reservoir when the lever is pulled. If more fluid is needed because of pad degradation, it passes it into the active system. Therefore with more fluid in the system, the piston is pushed out ...


14

Restoring the bike is a great way understand the bike. My history is similar to yours. Gave up bikes around 10. Wife want to me ride with her. I got a top of the line bike on CG for peanuts. of course, it was top of the line around the 90s :) cleaning start by REALLY cleaning the bike. simple green and brushes. don't be afraid to wet the bike. just avoid ...


14

The short answer to your first question is "the power savings from using ceramic bearings compared to good steel bearings is almost zero." The short answer to your second question is "yes, it is possible to measure the difference but it's not easy." The longer answer, and the support for the shorter answers is below. First, however, it depends a little on ...


14

Cables will stretch over time, but they won't become elastic. They're made of twisted strands of metal, and metal isn't generally known for its elasticity. This sounds to me like your brake pads are shot. When they become spongy and glazed, you can squeeze your brake lever quite far and feel like little pressure is being applied. Get thee to a bikeshoppery. ...


13

I would classify tools into two groups. The ones you ride with, and the ones you keep at home. There may be a bunch of overlap, but it is harder to work with a multi-purpose tool, so if you end up using one tool all the time, a purpose-specific tool may be worth the purchase. Tools to carry with you: Tire levers. Patch Kit. Multi Tool. There are a ...


13

Your title answers your question. After the ride, wipe down the bike so that there is no excess moisture. Make sure that the bike is stored indoors, in a dry, warm environment, so that any remaining moisture can evaporate. If you have a steel frame, consider using a frame preparation like Frame Saver, if you're going to ride in the rain regularly. And ...


13

Sheldon Brown was a good man, a good cyclist, and he spent an inordinate amount of time writing answers for everybody to questions that every new cyclist has. In a lot of ways, his answers were pretty dead on. However, like any person with the energy and commitment that Mr. Brown showed with his site, he was very opinionated on a number of issues which are ...


12

Lube your chain frequently. As in every time it rains if you need to. Depending on the drive-train, you can get Shimano or SRAM chains at places like Nashbar or Performance Bike, but even top-of-the-line, expensive chains will get rusty if they're out in the rain all the time. The same will hold with a Brooks saddle. No matter how awesome it is, if it's ...


12

Let's try to steer this into some kind of sensible question with the perspective as seen from a typical bicycle shop workshop and what is on the road. In a bike workshop you can find yourself working on bikes that can be up to fifty years old with a large quantity of them being more than ten years old. Some of these bikes have not been out of the garden ...


12

In that order (my opinion, of course): Tires. Bad tires suck your energy and are prone to flats. Good tires can make your bike fly, sometimes even act as a suspension. As an extra, tires aren't actually part if the bike, so if you have good tires, you can use it in other bike(s); Brakes and brake levers. This is safety and comfort. Bad brakes can make your ...



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