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3

It could just be bad luck. Or, there may be a piece of glass, a tack/nail, or caltrop stuck in your tire in a way that wasn't visible to the shop that replaced your inner tube. It may be deeply embedded in the rubber tread, invisible on both sides, and only pierce the inner tube when under both air pressure and the weight of a rider. When you or the shop ...


2

I think the rust on the pad surfaces will go away on its own when you use the brakes. It's probably just a thin layer on the surface. I don't think it hurts the brake disks, since rusted metal is softer than the original metal before rusting. The rust on the backing material probably doesn't matter much either, since you were still able to remove the pads ...


2

I don't think you can. It looks to me like the anodized surface layer has worn off, exposing the plain aluminum.


2

Rust on the surfaces of the pads & disc could cause extra wear & noise, or if bad enough reduce the effectiveness of the brakes. If there is enough present that you can see residue on your finger after rubbing the surface, I would suggest cleaning with a stiff bristled brush or a kitchen scrubber & isopropyl alcohol (some people have recommended ...


1

I have exactly the same 'stains' on my 2003 Centaur Ergopower levers, which I also attributed to the layer of anodization wearing off. It is not corrosion. Different thermal expansion rates of the oxide and the alloy underneath could damage the layer of anodization. Not sure if the presence of mildy acidic human sweat could accelerate the process ...


1

I have some entrance level Shimano hydraulic brakes (bl-m445; br-m445) and while trying to bleed them, I accidentally overtightened the bleed nipple thus resulting in the threads being busted. I put some teflon tape on it and reinstalled it in the caliper, then resorted to burping the system. Although it took a while (max 15 mins) I managed to get from ...


1

If you clean the pads with some brake cleaner and a brush and they just look rusty, it's not necessarily a problem provided your brakes are grippy and effective. If clean them and replace any bent discs and your problems go away, you're probably safe as long as you keep a close eye on things. In other words, if your brakes are grippy, quiet, and smooth, a ...


1

Rust or other build-up on your pads is not an issue if you have enough surface left. Depending on the bran 1-2mm on either side is plenty. If your brakes aren't biting properly clean the pads and rotors with rubbing alcohol. Use an old toothbrush for the pads and a clean rag for the rotors.



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