Hot answers tagged

5

The correct tire pressure for you is typically not whats written on the tire sidewall. That's an arbitrary number determined by the marketing and legal departments at the tire manufacturer, not the engineers (usually it leads to an overinflated tire, which can damage the wheel and reduce control of the bike). You'll have to play with the pressure to get a ...


5

No, of course not. Having your bike wet and unlibricated for one day won't damage it in any way. Washing it and letting it unlubricated for long period of time will cause you some issues. But one day is not a problem...


4

Anything is fixable given time and effort and money. You need to decide first whether the bike fits you, and will do the job. Then decide if its safe - do the brakes work right? Does it stop and go okay? Are there and thick patches of rust? Poking at any suspicious rust with a pen will show how deep it is. Consumables need checking too - depending ...


4

Evidence, not sure. I can say I've used the Park Tool chain cleaner, which is pretty much a bath, along with Simple Green solvent for years with no problems whatsoever. It does completely remove the chain lube/grease, which is the point. When I clean the chain I want all the old lube off, along with the grit and dirt in the lube. As long as you remove ...


4

I cannot comment on derailleurs in general, just my own experience. My retro ride is 35 years old, and in that time I've ridden it about 150,000 km. It has Campagnolo Record derailleurs, and both are fine. Shifting is still good with the downtube shifters. The parallelogram is rock solid. I cannot claim to have maintained it especially well. It's only ...


3

If you use your bike everyday, i would say you need to whack some air in every couple of weeks. If you have left it sitting for a few weeks, it will need air. Most tyres have a pressure rating on the side- find yours and use it if you can. You'll be amazed at how much faster it will feel, and its also safer in terms of handling.


2

I agree with Batman's answer and would add to it that weekly pressure checking may not be enough depending on your setup and riding goals. I can get away with a weekly topping off of my tubes under 28mm conti road tires that I'll run at 100psi. If it's snowing/raining/whatever and I decide to run them at 80psi, they will be too soft after a week. I ...


2

Spraying a bike with water doesn't actually remove all grease that exists on the chain and similar otherwise unprotected surfaces. So letting it dry off for a day is fine. Even letting it stand for weeks is fine, if it is stored in a dry place with no condensation. However the situation is different if you actually do remove all lubrication from an ...


2

You seem to have the answer embedded in your question: sideways play in the pivots worn jockey wheels The pivots seem to get worn mainly by contamination - during mountain biking. The rough terrain doesn't help the situation either. The result of worn pivots seems to be worse chain retention over rough terrain. So I would say, if you ride down the ...


2

Short answer: no. If you're lucky the axle is simply installed the wrong way round so rather than swapping the cups, swap the axle round and see if that fixes the problem. The two cups have opposite threads, one left hand thread and one right hand thread. If you swap them and force them in you will cross thread the frame, and that's ugly to fix. ...


1

Sounds like a sticky piston to me. These can be a real pain to sort. To get the unstuck you remove the wheel, and push the pistons in and out a handful of times. Stick the bike in a sturdy stand. Remove the wheel. Squeeze the levers a few times to get the pistons sticking out a bit. Don't go too far as dropping a piston out is bad news. Push them back in. ...


1

As any others have said, nope, nothing will reeeaaallllyyy happen. The only thing you need to worry about is if the water sits for too long on parts such as your chain. Just make sure you buy proper lubricants, and NOT WD40's spray can!!!! ;) Also, if you plan to do that often, it's best to just get a cheap rag and wipe the bike down to dry off most of the ...


1

There appears to be confusion on this issue, I think the answer is here: Back tires wear out quicker than front tires. Therefore, someone wonders if they should be swapped to even out the wear. However, apparently front tire blowouts are more dangerous, so this is not a good idea (to have more worn out tires up front than back). But it is a good idea to ...



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