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7

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


4

Have you recently replaced a tire or tube? If so, then the tire may not be properly seated. Remove the wheel, hold it in your lap lying flat, and rotate the wheel around looking at the edge of the rim and tire. You are looking for a "low spot" where the tire appears to "disappear" down into the wheel. It will be slight, but it doesn't take much. My old road ...


4

When you're matching chainrings to a crank, you need to match the bolt pattern (i.e. are there 4 bolts, 5 bolts) and the bolt circle diameter (BCD) measured in mm -- the diameter of the circle which all the bolts lie on [or equivalently, the center-to-center distance (C-C) of adjacent bolts. Multiply this (in mm) by 1.701 to get the BCD for 5 bolt patterns, ...


4

Something is dragging as you pedal harder. The most likely thing is that your rear wheel is moving so that the tire drags against the chain stay when you apply power. This is something that you'll probably need to troubleshoot when you're riding because it isn't likely to show up with the bike on a work stand. You might be able to make it happen by applying ...


3

My guess is that your rear end is flexing and either: Rear rim is touching the brake pad, or Tire is rubbing the chainstay With the former, try checking your wheel alignment and loosing your brakes a bit (safely) and testing. With the latter, look for tire rub marks in your chainstay area where the chainstay meets the bottom bracket.


3

The pictures I've found of the FD-TY18 look like the pin across the rear of the cage is riveted in place. So, you probably can't remove it without a bit of work – through if the derailleur is damaged beyond repair it probably won't be too hard to either pry it apart (try holding with a screwdriver and twisting one side with pliers) or to cut it (and do ...


2

First thing I would suspect is that you somehow installed the tube incorrectly, maybe twisted. Next, you may have installed the tube before the glue dried and failed to dust the patch with talc, causing it to stick to the inside of the tire. Or the tube may have been too small from the start, and the patches are keeping it from stretching enough to fill ...


2

The derailleurs (aka switchers) are controlled by the cable that runs between the lever and the derailleur. On most bikes, increasing the tension in the cable will move the front from the inner chainring towards the outer chainring. Here's what I'd do: First, I'd look carefully at the front derailleur and put a bit of oil on all of the places that look ...


2

I'm a little puzzled by the threads that look like they should draw the hub's axle back to tension the chain. They don't appear like they can move, but it also doesn't look like there is a nut on them to pull the axel back. Do you know if they thread into the frame, or are they free to slide? That said, it appears that the load on the mechanism would tend ...


1

Try something specifically designed for seized parts. PBlaster or Kroil come to mind. Whatever you do, definitely exhaust the non-mechanical remedies before you get out the breaker bar!


1

Your insight about the pressure is interesting, but it doesn't tell us where the leak is. Remove the tube from the bicycle. Inflate the tube, and listen for the leak. Check the valve by sticking it in your ear. If you can't pinpoint it's location that way, put the tube underwater and watch for a bubble stream. If the leak is coming from the valve, you ...


1

These are called friction shifters and you can still buy new ones. You should be able to get better performance from the ones you have though. Note the 2 black plastic wing nuts on the side of the shifter. It is very important to tighten these enough to get the right amount of friction to stop the derailleur slipping out of gear. It takes a bit of trail and ...



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