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15

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


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Maintenance on a bike is much less than maintenance on a car. It is a much, much simpler machine with far fewer parts. As such there isn't such a thing as a maintenance schedule or service book. That said, there are a few things you should do; Tyres Visual inspection and pressure check once per week. Chain The chain needs to be cleaned and lubricated. The ...


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Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


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Daniel R Hicks's answer-as-a-comment: As it says, it's intended for lubricating sliding parts. Not ideal for ball bearings. – Daniel R Hicks 2015-06-23 11:48:24Z "Dry lubricants" are not a good choice for ball bearings, as they do not exclude water. The #1 role of bicycle bearing grease is to keep water out. – Daniel R Hicks 2015-06-25 12:05:18Z


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I would go for a good floor pump, as I find it can be extremely important in preventing flats. One big problem I see is underinflated tires. This can cause flats and other problems like rim damage. A good floor pump will make it not so much of a chore to ensure your tires are always properly topped up. If you plan on leaving your bike anywhere except your ...


2

Without the shifter's resistance, the rear derailleur pulls towards the smallest cog (highest gear). This would also happen, e.g., when the shift cable snaps. (Rarer 'inverse' derailleurs would pull towards the largest cog.) To test the rear derailleur, pull the shift cable with your hand while turning the crank; if the derailleur moves and pushes the chain ...


2

Most bikes don't really come with much of a guide or instructions. Buy a Park Tool Big Blue Book of Bicycle Repair or one of the Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance (or Mountain Bike Maintenance) and you'll have some pretty comprehensive guides on how to maintain, fix, or replace just about anything on your bike. Specialty tools may apply for ...


2

There isn't necessarily a standard: manufacturers should provide you with the specific torques for each of their components: Specialized should give you the torque for frame screws, Shimano for derailleur and shifters, Race Face for the cranks, Hope for the brakes, etc. It is also possible that the same component has different torque recommendations if ...


1

Understand that there are several different types of torque wrenches -- simple "beam" units with a pointer indicator and a scale, "click" wrenches which emit a sound to indicate when the set torque has been achieved, "slipper" wrenches which slip when the torque has been achieved, and probably some other variations. Significant features/specs are mode of ...


1

Increasingly, manufacturers have started labeling|stamping their parts with their recommended (or required for warranty) torque specifications on the part itself. You will see this as "10N·m" somewhere near the bolts usually. As far as your crank arm issue, it's unlikely that a torque wrench will fix the issue. Unless you were drastically under ...


1

Easiest way to put the pin back? Pull the link apart just enough to set the pin from the inside. Make sure one side is straight and tap it in with a hammer. Flip it over and tap the other side in. Can do it in about 30 seconds and no hootin' and hollerin'


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I have a "Bicycle Diary", just a plain notebook where I keep a log with every maintenance task done (parts changed, chain lubing, greasing, ...), rides (where, when, how long, ...) and general notes. I also made a chart with entries for each component (chain, cassette, pads, ...) and the odometer lecture when I changed it (so I can know when a replacement is ...


1

If you already have the usual tools and clothing you can always need more of the typical wear parts: Tires, tubes, chains, brake pads, chain oil, cables, pants … Otherwise I’d start with a proper stand pump, mini pump (for on the bike), tubes, chain tool, hex keys, lock, bottles, helmet … Clothing is of course essential but hard to guess the right size for ...


1

Bicycle maintenance is more generic than car maintenance due to design. Bikes don't often have any custom parts besides the frame. All the rest are usually off the self components from different vendors. So, there is not much point to have maintenance schedule for a particular bike. Besides, bikes usually don't come equipped by bike computers by default so ...


1

I generally use the cartridge brakes because I they are easier to replace. Just pull the cotter pin and slide out the old one, slide in the new one, replace the cotter pin and you are done. Don't have to re-setup the brakes. Another plus is the spares take up less space. You can get various compounds with each type. The non-cartridge type have more ...


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There's little difference between the two types as far as braking performance is concerned, as you can easily find the same pad compound in both types. I've been able to easily find Salmon Kool Stop brake shoes that fit the vintage Mafac brakes on my Peugeot 12 speed. That being said, the one issue you may run into is the lack of the correct inserts, which ...



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