Hot answers tagged

16

It's doable although it doesn't make sense from a cost perspective. Only do it if you have an emotional investment in the bike or want a fun project that will teach you a lot about bike mechanics. To give you an idea, I bought a 1975 Peugeot UO18 Mixte (a woman's road bike, perhaps similar to your mom's) that had been stored in a barn and turned it into my ...


16

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


11

The little rubber tubes are for repairing Woods/Dunlop valves. The valve core does not have any valve mechanism in itself, but relies on the little rubber tube to seal. The tube fits over rounded end of the valve core shown below. Most of new tubes come with similar-looking valve that has a ball and spring mechanism instead of the rubber tube.


10

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


9

As far as outside testing goes, Friction Facts is an independent company that does exactly what you ask for, testing components against each other to find out what is best, including chains in a variety of conditions (new, re-lubed, wet, dirty, etc). The top manufacturers presumably have unpublished data, considering that bikes continue to get faster and ...


9

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


8

This from an old article circa 1996 it references a Medai floor pump. "Screwed into the base near the compression tube is an air tight steel chamber. This chamber is known as a reservoir and holds a volume of the compressed air to assist in equalizing the pressure of the pumps compression chamber and the inner tube. This feature gives the tire a small assist ...


8

As a completely different answer, I am sure a lot of these type of tests are done by manufacturers. The information likely remains proprietary and never sees the light of day. The job of marketing is not to disseminate scientific facts, but to convince the public to purchase item X. The business model of cycling publications is to entertain, not run ...


8

They're called simply chainring bolts. The tool to hold the other part while tightening is chainring bolt wrench.


8

You could try replacing your current pads with a set that come with double conical washers. It sounds, and looks, like this set of pads doesn't have them, but there appears to be enough space for you to install them. The washers come in pairs, one concave and one convex, with enough "slop" to allow them to sit at an angle as the pad mounting screw passes ...


8

No. Older bicycles are no harder to work on than modern bicycles provided you have specialized knowledge regarding older standards, possibly specialized tools and the ability to obtain parts designed for older standards. Generally a bicycle built now will likely conform to a set of standards that are common and in place now. If you bought a bike today, ...


7

Its up to personal preference at the end of the day, but a general recommendation is to replace at (or before) the 0.5% point for 11 speed and 0.75% for 10 speed or lower. You can also see if theres something in the chain manual or chain wear gauge's manual. The multiple indicators are there because some people will want to change at 0.5%, others at 0.75% ...


7

No. The only advantage of expensive chains within a specific brand is the minor reduction in weight. The ones with extra plating do look nicer and provide some corrosion resistance, but it takes almost no effort to keep your chain rust free. There are differences between various manufacturers, but in general those relate to shifting and how the quicklinks ...


7

I would avoid doing this. If the Teflon lube has any kind of solvent in it (which it probably does to carry the Teflon), it will break down the grease in the bottom bracket. Eventually, the grease will thin out enough that it will flow out of the bottom bracket, and No More Lube=A Very Bad Thing. If you are using a basic cartridge bottom bracket, they are ...


7

We've tried at the local bike coop, and nothing really works. A shim or boot on the inside helps but putting anything on the outside won't last. Even using rubber cement and a puncture plug (like a car tyre) doesn't stick very well because bike tyres are not very thick, so there is insufficient "meat" for the plug to bond to. If you make the plug longer, ...


6

We cannot tell you what size cranks you need. Perhaps someone has direct or similar experience to help you with. If not, here's my advice ... In order of preference Talk to the rehabilitation people who (I am guessing) helped with the knee replacements. Find out if they can advise you on this, or if there is a sports physiotherapist (or similar) that ...


6

At the stage you're at I normally vandalise them out. Get a big flat head screwdriver and use it more like a chisel - wedge the flat under the parts I can see and break them off, trying to break the part that has the thread on it at the same time. Plastic caps usually shatter while I'm doing that and all the bits fall out. If not I remove the bottom ...


6

When you're matching chainrings to a crank, you need to match the bolt pattern (i.e. are there 4 bolts, 5 bolts) and the bolt circle diameter (BCD) measured in mm -- the diameter of the circle which all the bolts lie on [or equivalently, the center-to-center distance (C-C) of adjacent bolts. Multiply this (in mm) by 1.701 to get the BCD for 5 bolt patterns, ...


6

Maintenance on a bike is much less than maintenance on a car. It is a much, much simpler machine with far fewer parts. As such there isn't such a thing as a maintenance schedule or service book. That said, there are a few things you should do; Tyres Visual inspection and pressure check once per week. Chain The chain needs to be cleaned and lubricated. The ...


6

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


6

My ideal packing includes: Tools: Hex keys to fit your bike : 2mm, 4mm, 5mm the most important, 6mm and 8mm. Some bikes use 2.5mm and 3mm. A T25 driver if you have disk brakes. Phillips and flat screwdrivers. Chain tool and a master link or two (may need to remove twisted links). Tire Levers Patches, glue, extra tubes and pump or inflator. Spare Valves, ...


6

With young children is very rare for them to have the hand strength to cause a problem with brake strength. Their hands are small and weak, giving small reach hence low level action in the brake handle. Children bikes are built using cheap components (Even the components on the best children bike rate just above BSO adult bike components) The bikes for my ...


6

Your bike has a conventional threaded bottom bracket (square taper). Since its a relatively new bike, it shipped with a sealed (*) bottom bracket. So, the only maintenance that can be done is tightening the bottom bracket cups (which hold the bottom bracket in place) and replacing the bottom bracket itself (which is a sealed unit containing the bearings, ...


6

Assuming a decent and well maintained mountain bike it can handle much more abuse than riding up and down curbs or jumping around a bit. Even the most lightweight mountain bikes will not have the slightest problem with that. However, two things are important: Good maintenance and riding technique! Riding on underinflated tires or a badly serviced suspension ...


6

I'm assuming you have rim brakes, since you are asking about wear and aligning brakes. Winter riding will wear out everything faster. The rims are going to be wet and dirty for most of the time, and the same goes for transmission. It might be a good idea to use any old equipment you don't care about as winter parts. The exception is that better hubs have ...


6

One of the advantages of having winter wheels is that you can spec wider rims for the winter season. Fatter tires should be able to give you more traction in snow and mud. You can then switch to thinner rims and tires in the spring. Your winter wheelset could be on the cheapside since you're not particularly interested in superlight wheels. You can often ...


6

Firstly, I do not believe (from your description) that air is the culprit here. Air is a gas and therefore can be compressed in a closed system such as a bicycle brake. As PeteH pointed out, air would lead to a brake lever feeling spongy, not tight. If you say the brake is tightening over time then I would be inclined to think that there is water being ...


6

Its likely that your bad shifting is due to messed up cables or a misadjusted derailleur. You can either cut the cable crimp off at the end of the cable with a pair of pliers, or pull it off with a pair of pliers. As for replacing the cable housing, you can either get your bike shop to cut a piece of housing of the right length by taking your old housing ...


5

Since it's a new-to-you secondhand bike, for safety's sake as well as to deal with the sluggishness I recommend you take it to a bike shop for a complete overhaul. I'll bet you'll be astounded at the difference when they're done.


5

This is not really an answer, but it's too long for comments. @Daniel has given some good starting points. For a bike of the vintage, Richard's Bicycle Book by Richard Ballantine would be a good bet, and is available second hand. When you say rusty, do you mean the frame, or wheels, handlebars, brakes, pedals, etc? The way to approach such a project ...



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