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14

The ball-end wrenches are really handy when there's an obstruction in front of the bolt, since they can be inserted at a slight angle. But since the contact area is smaller, you're slightly more likely to strip the hole. So I would use a regular wrench when possible.


11

Each set of "inner plates" is a link. Each set of "outer plates" is a "link." In the photo below you can see two whole links. Thus to answer the question, Image A in the question above has 4 links. Image B has 8 links. When you buy this box of chain and it has 120 links and is standard 1/2" pitch, you should expect to get 60 inner links, 60 outer ...


10

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


9

No. Older bicycles are no harder to work on than modern bicycles provided you have specialized knowledge regarding older standards, possibly specialized tools and the ability to obtain parts designed for older standards. Generally a bicycle built now will likely conform to a set of standards that are common and in place now. If you bought a bike today, ...


9

I'd get a new chain and use a chain tool next time. The links have rivets in them which are hard to push out without a chain tool (and other tools can weaken the chain leading to failure, especially with a cockamamie way like you're trying). Given that a cheap chain tool is 10-15 dollars it's a worthy investment relative to the cost of a replacement chain. ...


8

They're called simply chainring bolts. The tool to hold the other part while tightening is chainring bolt wrench.


8

You could try replacing your current pads with a set that come with double conical washers. It sounds, and looks, like this set of pads doesn't have them, but there appears to be enough space for you to install them. The washers come in pairs, one concave and one convex, with enough "slop" to allow them to sit at an angle as the pad mounting screw passes ...


7

I would avoid doing this. If the Teflon lube has any kind of solvent in it (which it probably does to carry the Teflon), it will break down the grease in the bottom bracket. Eventually, the grease will thin out enough that it will flow out of the bottom bracket, and No More Lube=A Very Bad Thing. If you are using a basic cartridge bottom bracket, they are ...


7

We've tried at the local bike coop, and nothing really works. A shim or boot on the inside helps but putting anything on the outside won't last. Even using rubber cement and a puncture plug (like a car tyre) doesn't stick very well because bike tyres are not very thick, so there is insufficient "meat" for the plug to bond to. If you make the plug longer, ...


7

First, not all full suspension bikes use bearing for all pivot points, and some bikes don't use them for any. They use bushings instead. That said, assuming you have bearings at all points on your bike: There are 2 types of bearings damage which require replacement in a suspension system. The first, bearing play, means lateral movement inside the bearing ...


6

When you're matching chainrings to a crank, you need to match the bolt pattern (i.e. are there 4 bolts, 5 bolts) and the bolt circle diameter (BCD) measured in mm -- the diameter of the circle which all the bolts lie on [or equivalently, the center-to-center distance (C-C) of adjacent bolts. Multiply this (in mm) by 1.701 to get the BCD for 5 bolt patterns, ...


6

Your bike has a conventional threaded bottom bracket (square taper). Since its a relatively new bike, it shipped with a sealed (*) bottom bracket. So, the only maintenance that can be done is tightening the bottom bracket cups (which hold the bottom bracket in place) and replacing the bottom bracket itself (which is a sealed unit containing the bearings, ...


6

Assuming a decent and well maintained mountain bike it can handle much more abuse than riding up and down curbs or jumping around a bit. Even the most lightweight mountain bikes will not have the slightest problem with that. However, two things are important: Good maintenance and riding technique! Riding on underinflated tires or a badly serviced suspension ...


6

I'm assuming you have rim brakes, since you are asking about wear and aligning brakes. Winter riding will wear out everything faster. The rims are going to be wet and dirty for most of the time, and the same goes for transmission. It might be a good idea to use any old equipment you don't care about as winter parts. The exception is that better hubs have ...


6

One of the advantages of having winter wheels is that you can spec wider rims for the winter season. Fatter tires should be able to give you more traction in snow and mud. You can then switch to thinner rims and tires in the spring. Your winter wheelset could be on the cheapside since you're not particularly interested in superlight wheels. You can often ...


6

Firstly, I do not believe (from your description) that air is the culprit here. Air is a gas and therefore can be compressed in a closed system such as a bicycle brake. As PeteH pointed out, air would lead to a brake lever feeling spongy, not tight. If you say the brake is tightening over time then I would be inclined to think that there is water being ...


6

Its likely that your bad shifting is due to messed up cables or a misadjusted derailleur. You can either cut the cable crimp off at the end of the cable with a pair of pliers, or pull it off with a pair of pliers. As for replacing the cable housing, you can either get your bike shop to cut a piece of housing of the right length by taking your old housing ...


6

At the stage you're at I normally vandalise them out. Get a big flat head screwdriver and use it more like a chisel - wedge the flat under the parts I can see and break them off, trying to break the part that has the thread on it at the same time. Plastic caps usually shatter while I'm doing that and all the bits fall out. If not I remove the bottom ...


6

There was a questionnaire on Bikeforums on this topic and here you can see the results: Brifters - how reliable are they? 39 people gave their votes and obviously for most people brifters did not break at all. The second question is about working optimally. To be honest I am yet to see a brifter which does not work optimally. Brifters have very little to no ...


6

There are a number of options, and this partly depends on how thorough a kit you need to carry with you. (i.e everything for every job, or a typical mechanic's pit kit) The best traveling tool kit I've found is made by B&W International. Their Bike Buddy case is sold either with or without tools included, and is a carry-on friendly, rolling hard case,...


6

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


5

Have you recently replaced a tire or tube? If so, then the tire may not be properly seated. Remove the wheel, hold it in your lap lying flat, and rotate the wheel around looking at the edge of the rim and tire. You are looking for a "low spot" where the tire appears to "disappear" down into the wheel. It will be slight, but it doesn't take much. My old road ...


5

The advantage to centre lock is that it's easier to change rotors. You undo one nut and slide the rotor off. ISO requires 6 bolts to be undone/redone. It's also possible to build a lighter rotor more easily, and you can make smaller centre lock rotors than ISO ones (should you want a 50mm rotor) The adaptor does both, that's a question about how you choose ...


5

I have 2 torque wrenches. One that goes up to 20Nm and another that goes from 20-60(ish)Nm. The little one is necessary for most of the things on my bike like my headset bolts and hollowtech crank bolts (around 7Nm and 14 NM from memory) and the big one is mainly for the cassette (40Nm) and bottom bracket (can't remember) and (just quietly) undoing stuck ...


5

There are two possibilities: 1.) The roller brake mechanism and internals are completely seized. Based on the level of rust on the outside of the brake, there is a strong possibility that there is rust inside as well. Shimano roller brakes do need to be in fairly good condition, and have the correct Shimano grease in them to work well. If the brake had a ...


5

No, of course not. Having your bike wet and unlibricated for one day won't damage it in any way. Washing it and letting it unlubricated for long period of time will cause you some issues. But one day is not a problem...


5

The correct tire pressure for you is typically not whats written on the tire sidewall. That's an arbitrary number determined by the marketing and legal departments at the tire manufacturer, not the engineers (usually it leads to an overinflated tire, which can damage the wheel and reduce control of the bike). You'll have to play with the pressure to get a ...


5

Option 1 - Nothing Many fixed gear riders are short distance, and tend to be close to home. The creed is to remove superfluous things from the bike making it lighter and simpler. Why carry tools at all? All you need is a cellphone, or some way to pay for taxi. Some tyres have a phenomenal puncture resistance, so this makes punctures less likely, at the ...


5

There is no way you can accurately assign a distance to disk brake replacement. Someone commuting in a stop and go method in a wet climate like the pacific northwest will get much less life out of their setups than someone living in a drier/cleaner climate and a more continuous commute. Anyone can determine the relative life left in their setup by looking ...



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