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2

The DT Swiss 240s front hub is a sealed bearing hub. Service includes removing the endcaps, removing the bearing seals, regreasing the bearing cartridge, and then reversing the process. There are no special tools required. The end caps are a friction fit, and, while they are tight, they will remove by hand. If bearings are damaged, replace the entire ...


3

The "bottom bracket" assembly is loose. It may just be that it's a one-piece "cartridge" and is rattling around in the frame, or it may be that the unit is "loose bearings" and the bearing caps need to be adjusted. Or there may have been some sort of failure of the bearings. Regardless, the whole mess will need to be disassembled to a degree, and that ...


0

Looks to me like it is an american to square taper conversion BB, they look like this out of the frame if that is indeed what it is. If that is correct it may just need tightening, also if the BB shell hasn't been damaged you can just get replacement bearings from you LBS if just the bearings are bad. Either option is relatively inexpensive. Tool wise if ...


1

For the fiddly stuff (screws, cable ends) one of those could work. They are not very durable, but are extremely inexpensive (I got an identical box for under 1EUR). Look in the electronics (soldering equipment, wires, inexpensive speakers, PCB audio amplifiers) kind of stores.


3

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


0

The front mech may have been misaligned and you've applied weight at a moment when it's not fully shifted. Your weight has bent the chain ring. I have bent a SR Suntour chainring in a similar manner. Halfords have grounds to say it's a user vs a product issue and may not replace it. Depends on the store and the sales person on the day or how hard you're ...


3

There are a number of options, and this partly depends on how thorough a kit you need to carry with you. (i.e everything for every job, or a typical mechanic's pit kit) The best traveling tool kit I've found is made by B&W International. Their Bike Buddy case is sold either with or without tools included, and is a carry-on friendly, rolling hard ...


2

I can't imagine a backpack being a good place for tools in the long run. The lack of structure would drive me bonkers- it'd be so easy to keep losing those little bits in all the cloth folds and seams. If you wanted to go this route, I'd look into bags aimed at photographers since they come with lots of little, structured pockets. This is probably the most ...


0

What happened at the moment it bent? Were you in a super low gear and booting the pedal down? You said earlier its a Halfords bike, which to me is a BSO made of cheap metal for the lowest price. Is this it? http://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/mountain-bikes/voodoo-bizango-29er-mountain-bike Curiously its priced well above the normal level for ...


2

This could have also been a loose mounting bolt causing the excessive gap. So here's the way warranty works. The bike shop looks at your bike. They make a recommendation to the manufacturer about what caused the defect. If they believe it was loose bolts on the small sprocket from the factory slightly bent sprocket from the factory, made worse by the ...


0

A chain shouldn't even come close to fitting between the chain rings if all the parts are selected to work together. Either the bike was built using badly matched components or something was wrong (bent) to start with. I suspect the latter as that's a chainset for 10 speed chains - unless that was specified but a different model was fitted in error. It's ...


2

I have one suggestion to add to this thread... ...the best way to check cartridge bearings is to check them. Remove the cranks. No need to remove bottom brackets for this, but if you have the tools available you might as well. This is a good opportunity to clean the BB face and shell and check for any corrosion. To check the bearings simply spin them with ...


2

The bearing races themselves get replaced, but what can happen is the races becoming loose in the frame. I can't imagine that happening just through wear, though, you'd have to pull and replace the bearing races hundreds of times. Normally that is the result of either a crash deforming the races, or the bearing not being quite square when someone hammers it ...


0

If its the free-hub body you could just try replacing that! It should separate from the wheel with a large allen key (10mm) once you remove the axle and bearings. (price approx €20). If there's extreme play in it you would most likely get the symptoms you describe.


2

I ran into this issue on my bike recently. It could be a bent axle, damage on the inside of the hub, or both. If the axle is true, you will need to replace the hub or a whole new wheel. Good news, a new MTB wheel is relatively cheap, on the order of about $50-60.


1

The problem you are encountering is likely because the pressure during the bleed process forces the pistons out slightly - this means that in effect you overfill the system. You are best to push the pistons back fully with the old pads in place, then remove the old pads and replace with a bleed block. You can buy specially designed bleed blocks, or you can ...


7

First, not all full suspension bikes use bearing for all pivot points, and some bikes don't use them for any. They use bushings instead. That said, assuming you have bearings at all points on your bike: There are 2 types of bearings damage which require replacement in a suspension system. The first, bearing play, means lateral movement inside the bearing ...


3

Just noticed this old question and I thought I'd try to close it out. I finally took the bike in and the tech tinkered a bit and ended up replacing one of the bearings. It's entirely possible that I had, in fact, installed it incorrectly, which wouldn't be too surprising considering I'm still learning. Thanks to everyone for their comments!


2

In my humble personal opinion, I don't see it being an issue unless you are in an extreme situation such as downhill or freeride stuff, it which case it could result in a crash. Even then I feel like a good lock on grip is just fine and when tightened I have never spun one. According to WTB is can be dangerous though as their newest line of grips is aimed ...


-2

I am sure that there are cases where ridiculously easy spin of the handle could be problematic. E.g., pulling hard on the brake lever while your thumb is not optimally hooked on the handle for whatever reason. If the handle is loose, it could rotate and you could somehow slip or not be able to transfer enough force to the lever. Besides, there are occasions ...


3

There is an extremely small stiffening effect because the interface contact area increases slightly. But in aerospace we usually consider this a negligible effect. To make a system stiffer all the parts have to become stiffer, which of course does not happen because you tighten a bolt in the system



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