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4

Probably your best bet if you want to park them is to meet someone with a large shed who'll put the bikes up for you. If you make the finance/convenience tradeoff I think selling the bikes after your stay and getting new ones when you return might be a better option, but I understand the convenience of having the same bike. I can think of several options ...


1

Slice it off with a sharp knife if it is really big because a file will take too long and sometimes the large mass of rubber gets stringy on the edge with a file. Then file the whole pad flat. Re-surfacing the pad is part of normal brake pad maintenance. You want to remove glazing, uneven wear, and debris. Pick out and deep metal chunks with a sharpened old ...


0

Lubricate everything, all moving parts of the calliper, inside the housing etc. Wipe excess off. Use a thin penetrating lubricant (tri-flo or similar, not WD40) Be very careful not to contaminate pads, rims or disc rotors though. I once had a sticky cable disc brake calliper (BB7) which I thought had a weak spring. I was putting of the maintenance because I ...


0

I have just read your article on ceramic bearings and am forced to give you an unprofessional view point. Firstly i am an 80 year old bike rider who rides weekends with a younger group of 6o year old riders. If you are still with me , my riding consists of between 30 to 40 kilom each ride at a speed of between 25ks and 35ks . I find recitals about ceramics ...


1

Sounds like it could be the tension on the cable. If its the original then replace it. If its new then look at reindexing the gears? Have a look on Sheldon Brown for a much more comprehensive run down of what it might be. If all else fails it could be that its got rotated or slipped at some point. Just loosen the screw holding it to the frame and lift it up ...


0

In an emergency, you could always push out the pin of the next link (not fully, obiously) and reattach it where you removed the first pin. You'd lose a link (and possibly a gear) but you'd be able to ride home.


1

If the chain won't move to the smallest sprocket, there are two likely causes: too much tension on the Bowden cable (usually a result of re-tightening it too much – during operation it is more likely to lose tension) outer limiter screw on the derailleur too tight Of course there's also the possibility of a bent derailleur, but I'll leave that out for ...


1

I always carry the cutoff from a new chain (or a few links of it) in my kit. Take the chain apart at the next link down from where you lost the pin (being more careful this time) and then take two half-links from the cutoff and install them. And, while you have that cutoff piece handy, do a trial to see how many turns of the crank it it is to take the pin ...


5

What type of chain - Shimano have chain connector pins for exactly this task for many of their chains. Note the pin must exactly match the chain. If you have a length of the same chain (I always keep the left overs when I put ion a new chain) break the chain again and remake the chain with the leftovers. I have (in desperation - bike shops 100km away, no ...


3

Not attaching it will be bad, the thing it's there to lock will loosen or tighten as you pedal. What it does depends on whether it's a left hand or right hand thread. Looking at it, it might be a right hand thread, meaning a French or Italian bottom bracket. So it will tighten up as you pedal. That's unusual and may be the reason the lockring is loose ...


1

Many bicycle chains use different platings for the inner and outer links. Inner links are typically plated with a nickel/Teflon surface. Outer links will only get a nickel plating. The extra Teflon coating helps the inner surface of the chain glide over the cogs on the cassette. Here is a video of the manufacture process: ...


0

I have to say I never consider which pads I'll be using with rotors when I buy either. I buy organic for best stopping power and metallic for longest life (kevlar somewhere in the middle). For mountain biking, the weather and type of mud/grit you're riding on is a FAR greater killer of pads than a rotor; you can easily get through a new set of pads in a ...


3

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, Practice, Practice. There is no magic bullet for dealing with this problem ( it's the same problem you'll have adjusting cones on a hub. ) Knowing just how loose to leave it so it's tightened correctly when you're done is something that comes with experience. This tweaking required to get it just right is one of ...


-1

Cassettes are harder to measure. For example they adjust spacing for IG (Interactive Glide). Chain is something you can easily measure. And it is the cheapest and easiest component of the drive train to replace. A stretched chain will increase the wear on cassette and chain ring. Measure chain Replace chain when stretched For sure replace cassette ...


1

I found this video, and decided to do like him. He puts some kind of extension on his power drill, and on the end he puts a tiny 1 inch steel wire wheel. He drives the wheel up and down in the seat tube for some time until the rust is gone. I tried hard but never found a wirewheel this small in my country, at least not one that would fit on an extension. ...


1

If they are SRAM/Avid hydraulic brakes, you're screwed. The DOT 5.1 fluid attacks the o-ring seals, and makes constant issues. Storing the bike for a while, upside down or vertically, will also cause issues. If they are Hayes or Tektro, same deal with the the DOT 5.1. This means don't spend money on them, replace with a Shimano M596 or better. They use ...


2

Following on from Johnny's answer of using compressed air, how about getting one of those computer air duster cans (a bit like this one), and a water bottle holder (a metal one with some flex in it, so you can re-adjust the size of the bottle that it can hold). One like this is a great example: Then put the air duster in the water bottle holder! It's a ...


0

This is pretty much just a bike maintenance issue. Clean it after use Keeping it clean keeps corrosion at bay and from a psychological stance just makes the bike "feel" spiffier. Do regular maintenance every few weeks chain degreaser using a brush to scrub dirt out from between cogs and gears check/adjust tension on brake cables check/adjust shift ...


0

Looking around, it sounds like Shimano and other companies who do hoods may have discontinued them - it may be useful to shoot Shimano an email to see if this is true. I'd check your bike shop/co-op's parts bin - theres a good chance one of those shifters from a wreck is in there, which you can salvage the hoods from. Alternatively, if you go to a bike ...


1

The Suntour NEX cranksets are marked as "Interchangable Chainring Design" by Suntour, while the XCM's are marked as "Full Interchangable Chainring Design". This means that you can replace the big ring on a NEX crankset, but the middle and small ring are one piece. So, if you want to replace the middle chainring, you have to buy a whole new crankset (or ...


6

Don't use poison. It will likely not work. Would you be able to remove a dead spider from your bike anyway? How would you know it was dead? Poison is bad for other insects and animals in general. It's bad for you. I believe it's against the spirit of biking too. I don't think a bike cover will work for you. You will give spiders another place to hide. Even ...



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