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4

The significant numbers are the "50-559" which translate to 26" x 1.90" – my best guess is that what you're seeing is a molding problem that causes the '6' to look like a '5'. The 50-559 is the ISO size of the tire. The first number is the width (50 mm) and the second is the "bead seat diameter" (559 mm). Beware of 26" tires – there are two sizes that are ...


3

Tubes sticking to tires are pretty normal and not a problem, especially if the tube has been in the tire for a long time. Some people put talc or whatever in a tire to avoid this, but its not necessary.


3

Edit in response to new photo: I think this is your problem. You've loosened the wrong bolt! You've been looking at the pivot bolt(s), which just hold the stem together. To adjust the angle you need to loosen a bolt that you may not even have noticed, the one under the stem. I strongly suspect that your stem works like the one below: The bolt on the ...


2

It is likely that what you've got is a hex (Allen) head nut & bolt, similar to this seat post binder bolt. If you are lucky you may be able to work it free by loosening the undamaged side. To do that you will need to find way to keep the other side from moving. This could be easy or a real pain. First off, try to get some lubricant to the threads. Work ...


4

If you find that it can't be fixed, then try to go with a solid stem that's already at the correct angle. I had an adjustable one before and after adjusting it, I could never get it to be tightened properly and it would always wobble. A bike co-op or bike dump is a good place to look for parts like this as solid stems don't usually wear out and many of them ...


3

I would guess these take a metric Allen wrench, a.k.a. L-wrench, so if you used an English-sized one you can bork the hex, making it difficult to turn. The sticker in your second photo references M5, M6, etc., which are common abbreviations for metric hex-headed screws. Even if you carelessly use the correct metric wrench, you can still make a mess. I would ...


2

It seems like the first question to answer here is: freewheel vs. cassette. The, assumed, age of the wheel and being a 6-speed does suggest that it's a freewheel. However, even if it is an original wheel from the late '70s it is not out of the question that it could be a cassette (at least according to Wikipedia). Looking at the parts, I see several clues ...


0

I think your best bet is to go visit your local shop and ask them to remove it. Many freewheels look similar to cassettes when disassembled. They drive in a similar method with indexed notches to align the different sprockets. I believe yours is a freewheel. The lock ring threads being on the outside are one hint it may be a freewheel. As such there are a ...


4

Have you recently replaced a tire or tube? If so, then the tire may not be properly seated. Remove the wheel, hold it in your lap lying flat, and rotate the wheel around looking at the edge of the rim and tire. You are looking for a "low spot" where the tire appears to "disappear" down into the wheel. It will be slight, but it doesn't take much. My old road ...


0

This is a mighty old posting that I am responding to almost 5 years later, but I thought it would be helpful for those who are looking to overhaul their BB and thinking of moving to the external. For the most part that is captured here, External hubs are at least 30% lighter than the internal hubs. Because the bearing cups are outside the BB shell, it ...


0

I've been researching this question in order to be able to adjust my self-adjusting brakes ;) So I'll report my findings here. I can't vouch for the accuracy since I am no bike technician. The pistons are floating freely and are surrounded by seals. If there was nothing holding a piston back it would be possible to pump the brakes until it popped out of the ...


7

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


0

I usually replace my disk brake pads when I have 0.5 mm thickness. The reason I do that is because they can easily be smashed by the jaws to remove the braking material ( which will eventually fall apart ). After that it will result in a friction between the disk and the metal of the pads, which is very very bad. I change the disk when it stops braking ...


0

If you've got a Shimano chain it's unlikely that you've got a master link as most Shimano chains come with a one-time use connecting pin. You can pop this back out with a chain tool. It's not practical to easily remove it without the tool. You can replace with a kmc missing link (make sure you match it for the right chain) for easy disassembly in the future. ...


4

Something is dragging as you pedal harder. The most likely thing is that your rear wheel is moving so that the tire drags against the chain stay when you apply power. This is something that you'll probably need to troubleshoot when you're riding because it isn't likely to show up with the bike on a work stand. You might be able to make it happen by applying ...


3

My guess is that your rear end is flexing and either: Rear rim is touching the brake pad, or Tire is rubbing the chainstay With the former, try checking your wheel alignment and loosing your brakes a bit (safely) and testing. With the latter, look for tire rub marks in your chainstay area where the chainstay meets the bottom bracket.


0

Very easy! Get a good cutter and slice the derailleur cage. (Without a picture can't say it for sure, but I bet your derailleur isn't repairable if it bent so much that it prevent your crank movement).


3

The pictures I've found of the FD-TY18 look like the pin across the rear of the cage is riveted in place. So, you probably can't remove it without a bit of work – through if the derailleur is damaged beyond repair it probably won't be too hard to either pry it apart (try holding with a screwdriver and twisting one side with pliers) or to cut it (and do ...


2

I'm a little puzzled by the threads that look like they should draw the hub's axle back to tension the chain. They don't appear like they can move, but it also doesn't look like there is a nut on them to pull the axel back. Do you know if they thread into the frame, or are they free to slide? That said, it appears that the load on the mechanism would tend ...


1

Try something specifically designed for seized parts. PBlaster or Kroil come to mind. Whatever you do, definitely exhaust the non-mechanical remedies before you get out the breaker bar!


0

I have just spent 2 hours searching in the grass for that blasted ball bearing! I took the other out and have measured it. Since I have no micrometer, I set up a camera and place the bearing on a high quality tape measure. I photographed the ball on the scale. Cropped the image and blew it up to 400 odd times. Then measured the bearing on my screen with the ...


4

When you're matching chainrings to a crank, you need to match the bolt pattern (i.e. are there 4 bolts, 5 bolts) and the bolt circle diameter (BCD) measured in mm -- the diameter of the circle which all the bolts lie on [or equivalently, the center-to-center distance (C-C) of adjacent bolts. Multiply this (in mm) by 1.701 to get the BCD for 5 bolt patterns, ...


2

The derailleurs (aka switchers) are controlled by the cable that runs between the lever and the derailleur. On most bikes, increasing the tension in the cable will move the front from the inner chainring towards the outer chainring. Here's what I'd do: First, I'd look carefully at the front derailleur and put a bit of oil on all of the places that look ...


1

These are called friction shifters and you can still buy new ones. You should be able to get better performance from the ones you have though. Note the 2 black plastic wing nuts on the side of the shifter. It is very important to tighten these enough to get the right amount of friction to stop the derailleur slipping out of gear. It takes a bit of trail and ...


1

Your insight about the pressure is interesting, but it doesn't tell us where the leak is. Remove the tube from the bicycle. Inflate the tube, and listen for the leak. Check the valve by sticking it in your ear. If you can't pinpoint it's location that way, put the tube underwater and watch for a bubble stream. If the leak is coming from the valve, you ...



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