New answers tagged

0

I use 8 oz. flip-top bottles. They're inexpensive, easy to find, and the top does double duty as a spot applicator. They cost forty-seven cents a piece. I bought four so I could have extra bottles of lube in my car, on my bikes, and in my garage. Their 2-3 business day shipping was very reasonable for where I live (Maryland). http://www.specialtybottle.com/...


3

Likely two things. Bearing seals will slow down free spinning. In actual use the added resistance from the seals is minimal and the seals ensure the bearings remained greased and in good working order despite the weather conditions (e.g., from dry and dusty, to wet and gritty). SPD-SL are weighted so that the single sided pedal platform faces you (i.e., ...


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Motor oil is as good as any other fantasy chain lubes. What should be kept in mind is the motor oil is fresh and not leftover extract while servicing a vehicle. If the instructions are to re-lube (after cleaning) after every few rides, then there will not be a problem with motor oil even. If one wants to keep the lubrication longer, the thicker the ...


5

There is no way you can accurately assign a distance to disk brake replacement. Someone commuting in a stop and go method in a wet climate like the pacific northwest will get much less life out of their setups than someone living in a drier/cleaner climate and a more continuous commute. Anyone can determine the relative life left in their setup by looking ...


3

I too have made this blunder. The freehub buddy does work, but isn't in my toolbox. The simplest thing I do is to first have the body mounted on the wheel. Be sure that one of the two slits in the body is at the six o'clock position. I then add just enough automatic transmission fluid (atf) to the body so that it covers up to the axle hole. I spin the ...


1

I know you are supposed to: Resize the chain by from the side that terminates at an inner link, this way when you place the new pin into the chain, the outerlink has never had a pin in it before. There's wear created on outerlinks when you insert and remove a pin as you probably guessed by how much force you need with a chain tool to insert and remove a ...


2

It's not uncommon. Some Shimano shifters are prone to breaking off near the head in the shifter and it can be a bugger to get that little bit out of the shifter. My wife has Ultegra 9sp and I have to replace her cable about every 12-18 months. She can now tell when it's beginning to fray because the shifting gets dodgy before it completely breaks.


1

It's unusual to have to replace cables every year, you'd expect several years of lifetime under any normal circumstances, even without maintenance. So it could be that you got a duff cable, or it could be that the bike is left in a particularly harsh environment, or it could just be that your memory is playing tricks. But whatever the reason, brake cables ...


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If you have a Fuji, and its got a double chainring, you have what is called a loose ball bottom bracket that is square taper. Yes the ball bearings are caged in a little cage, but it is loose ball. All Japanese bicycles from the 80s have these horrible bottom brackets except the very top of the line, because most of them used the funky external nut ...


2

There are three main steps to adjust both derailleurs. The first is usually not necessary unless the rear is very far out of adjustment. Adjust the rear derailleur enough that it will stay in the lowest and highest gears, even if you have to help it a little with finger pressure on the derailleur arm. This may require adjusting the high and low limit ...


1

It does not matter. The derailleurs are located on opposite sides of the cogs, so the the relative location of derailleur and chain depends only on shifter position, derailleur adjustment and which cogs the chain is on. The derailleur on opposite side can not change chain position, except by moving the chain to different cog. It is far easier to adjust the ...


3

If the derailers just need minor tweaking (they are basically in adjustment but are "not quite right") then you adjust the one that is obviously wrong, check the overall adjustment again, then again adjust what needs adjusting. Often only one derailer needs adjusting and often the adjustment is just a half-turn of the barrel adjuster. If they are ...


-1

Start with the rear derailleur, then work your way up to the front. For a tutorial search for GCN on Youtube. They have a pretty good series of videos about this topic.


0

I learned that the rear should be adjusted completely first. The front is notoriously difficult to get just right.


3

Answer: "Yes" Every part of the system affects every other part of the system. So you could spend ages making the rear perfect, then go and tweak the front which puts the rear out again. Like truing wheels, back and forth is your best answer to focus down on the best position for both. Don't forget to clean everything before you do adjustments. ...


0

I did some weighing today Pressed-steel one-size spanners 91g 102g 76g Open-ended and closed 9/16" ring spanner 97g Open-ended and ratcheting 9/16" ring spanner 110g 6" adjustable spanner 131g 8" adjustable spanner 207g 12" adjustable persuader of doom 400-420g (too heavy for scales!) I don't have a bone spanner here to test but I'd expect around 60 ...



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