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Can you at least get a visual inspection on the chain without taking off the guard. If you you can then you can tell when it is drying out, getting very dirty, and for sure you can see when it starts to rust. The frequency is going to vary by your conditions. Sponge sensitive parts or entire bike is also a choice. Yes grease will get on your clothes. ...


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I don't know if department stores like Walmart carry Presta tubes. You had a Presta and need to replace it with a Presta. The size you need is 700x35 or 27x1 3/8. I like thorn resistant tubes. They are heavier and more expensive but will usually go 10 times further without a flat.


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I will try and stick to your specific questions. To adjust either type at home is possible, neither is more difficult but have different techniques. On that basis I would say to choose freely, and learn how to maintain the one you own with a good how-to book or online videos etc. Disc brakes do not stop you any faster in the dry, but do potentially help ...


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If I understand your question your concern is the area of cable that is normally exposed.. The sections that run along the top tube or the rear stays. I bought a 300 meter coil of 1/8" id plastic tubing. Look on E bay or Amazon or similar.


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You can buy 30 meter rolls of cable housing such as http://www.wiggle.co.uk/transfil-gear-casing-30m-box/ . I would opt for Shimano or Transfil, as have seen problems with the much cheaper Clarkes. Brake cable housings have a completely different construction to shifters. The housing is a coiled sheath , compared to the axial strands in shifter housing. ...


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Difficult and vintage are relative terms, and I think that relativity can vary depending upon the mechanic and LBS in question. Old and vintage may at times be interchangeable, but vintage generally translates as not only old but also good or special or rare or loved. There are shops that regard bikes from the 90s as vintage, and still others that regard ...


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My brifters date from 1997 and are "early tech" When I got it, they shifted poorly, with a really annoying habit of changing down and then not changing back up. I blasted them with brake cleaner and various oils and fluids which helped, but the only fix was a teardown and soak the guts of it in petrol for a day, to soften the old hardened grease. Now it ...


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There's two different situations here. The first time disks are set up after installation can be a lot of work. The calipers need to be fixed in the right position, which can involve a special tool to shave a little off the mounts to get them square and parallel to each other, then some precise setting of the mounting adapters and positioning of the caliper ...


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If you are going to service them on the go you'll need to learn how. When you get new set of brakes, tear them apart and put them together a few times. It may take an hour or three, but then you'll know how to fix them. Which is better is really up to your use case. Both will stop your bike when necessary. My list of issues to consider: Replacing a disc ...


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The reliability depends on the quality of the brifter itself but, for most brifters, all you need to maintain, adjust, and them and keep them in good working condition is a hex key set, some spray degreaser, and a high quality grease. I use mostly sram brifters and they just work when they are set up right. To keep them in good working order I remove the ...


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There was a questionnaire on Bikeforums on this topic and here you can see the results: Brifters - how reliable are they? 39 people gave their votes and obviously for most people brifters did not break at all. The second question is about working optimally. To be honest I am yet to see a brifter which does not work optimally. Brifters have very little to no ...


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This is an opinion question. But this is my take on it. I have bar-end shifters on our tandem, brifters on my race and commuter bikes, and downtube shifters on a training bike. They are all extremely reliable. The bar-end shifters that I have are indexed, but they can be adjusted to run in a 'friction mode'. That is handy for swapping rear-wheels ...


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Disc brakes - to me - are easier to maintain than rim brakes. Rim brakes take a lot of adjustments as you wear the pads. The pads on rim brakes have to be given more and more toe-in adjustment as you wear the pads to keep them working optimally. Disc brakes are far less tedious. I will not buy a bike that I am going to ride a lot with rim brakes. Six of my ...


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No. Older bicycles are no harder to work on than modern bicycles provided you have specialized knowledge regarding older standards, possibly specialized tools and the ability to obtain parts designed for older standards. Generally a bicycle built now will likely conform to a set of standards that are common and in place now. If you bought a bike today, ...


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You mention a number of manufacturers there, but to be honest it's not so much the bike manufacturers you need to think about (there is no "standard frame"), its the manufacturers of the components - the groupset - which fit onto the frame. The key players there are Shimano, SRAM and (in some places, for road bikes only), Campagnolo. These companies are ...


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Quick answer: No. All modern bike, with modern components (not cheap bike!) is adequately easy to adjust and replace. They are (mostly) standardised now. Working on bikes has its own merits, as long as you can find parts. I guess it will be expensive trying to repair something that is already depreciated, in term of technology and manufacturing. Whether a ...


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It is always strongly recommended (by the manufacturers, I read it on Shimano's instruction sheet) not to lubricate a new cable when you're installing it. The reason is that both cable and housing are teflon-coated at the factory and lubrication could destroy that. When a cable loses the ability to move freely it is best replaced together with the housing.


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At first glance I see the problem you are having . Those are NOT friction shifters . They are positron shifters . Research Shimano Positron Shifters for a more definitive explanation This was Shimano's earlier attempt at an indexed gear system. Also known as "Positive Pre-Select" or PPS. The main differences are that the indexing is in the deraileur ...


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Try taking the tire off the rim, an use Krazy glue to shut-close the cut. Then boot the tire from the inside. If you have an old useless inner tube, cut a nice piece and use it to glue it inside the tire. I have put about well over 2000 miles after I did three of these repairs from 1" screw-incurred flats on my rear tire in my commuter bike.


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hi I think I found a solution to the problem. my handlepost on my MUXL would get loose after 2 commutes so what I did was I unscrewed the two bolts halfway that fix up to the stem and put loctitie on the threads and tightened them up and then loosened them an eight or a quarter (cant have them tight or you wont be able to open the latch) then I tightened the ...


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It would still be helpful if you posted a photo, but I think I can answer without it! The first major dimension of a bottom bracket is its width. If you have a metric ruler or tape, simply place it underneath the bottom bracket shell. There aren't a bunch of standards super close together so you'll easily get this one right. 68mm is really common and would ...


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1.37 x 24T is the big threadings, its 1.37 inches across and 24 threads per inch (so you need to turn it 24 times to advance it 1 inch) Also check Saint Sheldon's info at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbsize.html Based on that I guess you want a 3NN bottom bracket cartridge, but do use a ruler/calipers to confirm all the dimensions. Your other option is to ...



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