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2

First thing I would suspect is that you somehow installed the tube incorrectly, maybe twisted. Next, you may have installed the tube before the glue dried and failed to dust the patch with talc, causing it to stick to the inside of the tire. Or the tube may have been too small from the start, and the patches are keeping it from stretching enough to fill ...


4

If you inflated the tire and the tire itself is indented at times, it is likely that you did not seat the tire correctly. This means the tire bead is not sitting correctly in the rim. The rim should have hooks to catch the tire bead. The tube should expand to many times its original size and will fill the volume made available to it. As such, a tire that ...


0

I may have missed it in this thread but what kind of bicycle is it? If it's something like a Raleigh or a Peugeot or the like, it may be worth it in terms of both riding and getting the mechanical experience. If it's the 70's equivalent of a Huffy I'd pass mostly because that quality of a bike is virtually impossible to ever get adjusted properly and ...


0

Now then, seeing as it's been in a garage, it's obviously collected dust. Not too far off being collecting enough to seize some bearings. First, wash the bike clean. I mean, make it very clean. You don't want to work on a dirty bike that'd make any new parts dirty, as well. warm water, washing up liquid and a sponge is great. Clean from top to bottom, not ...


0

From firsthand experience I would say weaker front brakes and stronger rear brakes. When I was about 8 years old I was riding very fast and stopped short with the front brake, I went flying over the handlebars headfirst into the pavement (I wasn't a light kid either, I was actually one of the huskier kids), my helmet may have saved my life that day, I still ...


0

All Shimano rear derailleurs have same actuation ration (except for 10-speed MTB), so you can just swap in a Tiagra one. For the second question, a higher quality groupset will be slightly lighter and work better. The shifter levers on Tiagra and upwards are different design, allowing more comfortable shifting from the drops. Changing entire groupset will ...


6

With young children is very rare for them to have the hand strength to cause a problem with brake strength. Their hands are small and weak, giving small reach hence low level action in the brake handle. Children bikes are built using cheap components (Even the components on the best children bike rate just above BSO adult bike components) The bikes for my ...


0

It turns out that the issue was caused by a worn shifter cable casing -- the plastic tubing. LBS replaced it at around a fifth of the price of replacing the cassette and/or chain gears, and everything works like a charm now.


3

You have to make a distinction between the front and rear brakes. Strong rear brakes aren't dangerous, but strong front brakes (when in inexperienced hands) can cause a crash. For a bike that small, I'd go with a weaker front brake. The kid won't be going fast enough to warrant big stopping power. The rear brake isn't as important. I would leave it ...


1

I have run into two situations similar to yours and used two different methods. In both cases I removed the right side and gently tapped out the bearing and shaft. The first time I used a small 3/8" wide chisel. I caught the chisel tip on the remnants of the spline and gently tapped until it moved. I sprayed the area with ammonia. (Reference questions about ...


2

Q1 - Removing the damaged left cup: I think I'd do this by first removing the crank arms and the right hand cup. Then, I'd remove the axle. Once you have it all apart you can work on removing the left hand cup. Since it has a right hand thread what I think I'd do is to get an screw extractor (aka an EasyOut). You can find sets online fairly inexpensively, ...


3

I wrenched for a cyclocross team and those bikes see pretty torrential conditions. How are you cleaning the cables? If you're just cleaning them as they are on the bike it probably won't do much good. You need to take the housing out of its stops. How to do this: Rear derailleur: Shift your bike into the largest/inner rear cog. Now WITHOUT turning the ...


1

Since brake cables don't rust, I think the problem is that the cable housing gets dirty with mud or any other substances. The grit inside your housing will increase the friction so the brakes become hard to pull. A way to solve this is to prevent dirt gets inside your housing by investing in good fenders. Moreover, they will help to make the bike cleaner ...


0

Yeah loosen the brakes ,hold them with your hands such that the brakes just does not touch the rim of the wheel then tighten it . If you find it a bit loose the adjust the secondary screw for more accuracy .


1

Many decent hardware stores (at least in the US) will also carry them. Look in the fastener section of the store, where I usually find them is in the collection of small boxes that holds all of the oddball hardware.


0

One thing you haven't mentioned: when does the noise occur relative to crank position? Does it make the noise through the entire revolution of the crank arm? Is the noise loudest at a certain point in the crank revolution (say 2 o'clock)? I had a customer come in one time with a sound they absolutely could not get rid of and they went through most of the ...


1

The nut is most likely suffering from galvanic corrosion in which case penetrating oil won't work because penetrating oil does nothing to break the chemical bond holding the two parts together. Instead of penetrating oil you can try a mild acid (think lemon juice or vinegar) which might help eat away at the bonds without damaging the finish on your fork. The ...


0

Get over it HAS to be the chain. That could be a coincidence or a procedural side effect. Are you dripping oil on a loose chain ring. Oil spills onto a derailleur. Crank could be rubbing against the frame and the oil spills onto that. Do you ride a certain route or a certain way after a lube. You replaced the chain it did not fix it - you also have ...


0

To answer your question of why there are so many subjective discussions which are not backed by numbers: Because there is no accepted standard I am specifically not saying that there could not be such a standard (of course there could be), or how relevant it is, I am just mentioning that there is none. I believe the situation can easily be compared to car ...


1

The big thing is : you have a very subjective human riding the bicycle. Even if a study shows that for X leg length you need Y crank length, if the person riding the bike think that Z cranks feel better or feel faster, what can you do? That is mostly why there is so much debate, because everybody is different. Also people want different things from their ...


3

It's exactly the same thing in the automotive world. There are all kinds of studies showing you should do this and you should do that, but the vast majority of people just don't care. For example, I have no idea what kind of oil is in my car. It could be 10w30, it could be 10w40. It could be real or it could be synthetic. All I know is that there is oil in ...


8

As far as outside testing goes, Friction Facts is an independent company that does exactly what you ask for, testing components against each other to find out what is best, including chains in a variety of conditions (new, re-lubed, wet, dirty, etc). The top manufacturers presumably have unpublished data, considering that bikes continue to get faster and ...


1

A bicycle without a rider is not a machine, it is just a large paperweight or a piece of artwork. There are very few technical aspects that can be "objective" when the very machine itself has a greatly varying and subjective element inherent to it. Many of the other answers have touched on this issue, and that's that all bikes are not used exactly the same ...


2

It all comes down to tolerances and cost/benefit. On a highly engineered vehicle or machine, parts are subjected to tremendous forces, very near to the maximum point of resistance a piece can withstand. Tolerances are very tight in many aspects. Forces, temperatures, etc. For those machines, cost of replacement of parts, or repair due to damage from ...


8

As a completely different answer, I am sure a lot of these type of tests are done by manufacturers. The information likely remains proprietary and never sees the light of day. The job of marketing is not to disseminate scientific facts, but to convince the public to purchase item X. The business model of cycling publications is to entertain, not run ...


3

I think the other problem with trying to both do the research, and then present it, is that there are so many ways to define the "problem" and so many valid criteria for evaluating "best" or "optimal." To use your chain example, and just off the top of my head, are we talking about: Maximizing the life of the chain, or Minimizing the time spent ...


1

Well, it depends… Would you be happier cleaning a bunch of stuff out and getting a shiny new bike that reflects all you've learned? One that will "just work," or Would it be a fun project to build up a bike from scratch? Would it feel good to know that you'd "built it yourself?" Do you have the time for the project? Is it ok with you to get stuck and make ...


5

A lot of the research would be hard to do if not useless. For one thing, most bicycles just don't get used all that often -- plenty of people I know will likely never wear down any of the original parts on a bicycle even if they neglect the maintenance. Moreover, even among regular cyclists, we don't have enough people who would care about such a thing. So ...


1

I found this Bikepacking Repair Kit on Pedaling Nowhere. I like the way it is broken down into components of a tool kit and spares collection. There is some good stuff in the comments section too.


5

Everyone's going to have different list depending on how confident they are of getting assistance in an emergency or gear breakage. I do some solo rides into the forests in New Zealand. When in the forest alone I do tend to stick to 4x4 tracks where a may see one person an hour but also take jungle tracks alongside the road and very rarely see anyone. I ...


1

So, the quick answer is to take inventory of what is wrong with the bike, and start by fixing the things that seem possible. I'd be inclined to start with the absolute basics: Make sure the brakes work. The tires hold air, and That you've got at least one gear that works. Just take it slow and fix things one at a time, aiming for a bike that you're not ...


3

Not much: A mini pump mounted on the bike, spare tube, tire leavers and the hex keys you might actually need in a Frame Bag. 1.5l of water with carbs (glucose and maltodextrin) as food. For longer rides an extra plastic bag with enough carbs for another 1.5l in the jersey. I’m usually experienced enough to pick the right clothing for several hours or a ...


0

This is not that uncommon on mountain bikes. Many times a small pebble or trail or road debris is picked up by the tire and deposited in the pivots of the derailleur. It will sometimes dislodge if you shift onto the biggest ring. Other times you have to remove the object it by hand.


1

Unfortunately it depends a lot on the specific manufacturer. I usually get around 1500 km (or more) out of SRAM and Shimano chains. I always buy the least expensive option and usually 9 speeds. (All of my bikes are 3x9 speed mountain bikes) And I ride mountain trails in muddy or otherwise very humid conditions. I clean after each ride if needed, but when ...


6

My ideal packing includes: Tools: Hex keys to fit your bike : 2mm, 4mm, 5mm the most important, 6mm and 8mm. Some bikes use 2.5mm and 3mm. A T25 driver if you have disk brakes. Phillips and flat screwdrivers. Chain tool and a master link or two (may need to remove twisted links). Tire Levers Patches, glue, extra tubes and pump or inflator. Spare Valves, ...


1

The derailleur was sticking. A bit of lubrication and all was good again.


1

I've seen three bicycles with what appear to be stress fractures at the bottom of the seat tube and top of the bottom bracket shell. A bike nut friend with more metallurgical knowledge than me tells me that this is caused by work hardening -- which is the same thing that causes a paper clip to become brittle after repeated flexing. Now that this has ...


9

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


2

I get 5000 to 10000 kilometers from mid-priced 20€ Campagnolo C9 chains. I would say this is money well spent. Of course, as other answers state, riding conditions and maintenance do effect the chain life. In my experience SRAM and KMC chains are nowhere near as durable with similar maintenance.


10

The little rubber tubes are for repairing Woods/Dunlop valves. The valve core does not have any valve mechanism in itself, but relies on the little rubber tube to seal. The tube fits over rounded end of the valve core shown below. Most of new tubes come with similar-looking valve that has a ball and spring mechanism instead of the rubber tube.


4

The little tubes are for Dunlop valves. The tube is pulled over a stem. Air pressure will push the the tube against the stem and prevent the loss of air! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valve_stem If you look at the German translation of the page you find more pictures and one of the tubes in use. This type of valve was much used in England and also in Germany ...


7

No. The only advantage of expensive chains within a specific brand is the minor reduction in weight. The ones with extra plating do look nicer and provide some corrosion resistance, but it takes almost no effort to keep your chain rust free. There are differences between various manufacturers, but in general those relate to shifting and how the quicklinks ...


2

Your cassette and possibly chainwheels are worn out. When a chain wears, the cogs wear down together with it and will not mesh correctly with a new chain. Worn cogs do not look like the teeth would be actually wearing down. Instead, the teeth get narrower and eventually develop an asymmetric "shark fin" shape. If you do not know exactly what to look for, a ...


1

Pedaling while changing gears in important to avoid damage to derailleur and chain. Gear shifting proper technique by Sheldon Brown. Shift the gears so that chain is on the middle chain ring(at the pedals) and approximately on the middle gear on the cassette. Verify that the derailer with the chain is vertical, if not adjust accordingly. Also, it is ...


2

The Park Tool CWP-7 is the tool for this job. Remove the outer cap using an allen key and then install the CWP-7. There is no need to tighten it ultra hard. Then use an allen key on the CWP-7 and start tightening the bolt. The extractor will "penetrate" the crank and the crank arm will start detaching itself from the other crank arm which also has the ...



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