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22

Have a look at http://www.opencyclemap.org/ it uses the http://www.openstreetmap.org/ data, so you can help them by mapping your local cycle ways.


16

The easiest way to submit data is to right-click on the map and choose "Report a problem". This pops up a small form with a marker. You drag the marker where the problem is, and you pick a category and type something to explain the problem. In a few days, a human being reads it and (assuming he/she agrees) fixes it. For instance, Google Maps would send ...


14

Doesn't address your question with regard to maps, but I've found it easier to work from turn-by-turn cue sheets instead. I almost always ride a predetermined route, even if it's just something quickly charted up pre ride. Luxury is of course having access to google maps and being able to print out directions. I print out (or write out, sometimes you have to ...


11

You can use google maps, and click on the bike to see local bike paths and trails. (still in beta but very good nonetheless. http://www.bikely.com http://www.mapmyride.com http://www.ridethecity.com http://www.pedaling.com are some of the more popular routing sites, I'm sure there are more but that should get you started :)


8

I have seen some handlebar bags that have a slot for maps on the top. The map pocket is usually clear plastic designed to keep the map dry. (Hopefully this isn't what you meant by "pannier-attached map things" -- I have never heard of/seen those; maybe you were thinking handlebar bags?) There are lots of bags that have this (Google "handlebar bag map ...


7

1st option The best solution: Have a navigator with you, who has a handlebar bag with a map sleeve: Navig^^^^^Stoker cockpit 2nd option Otherwise I almost always ride with a handlebar bag, which has a transparent map sleeve on top. Both options on the same picture: Two maps possible, in case you want to go different routes 3rd option On trips ...


6

openstreetmap.org is a google map style map built from user supplied data. You can upload GPS tracks and edit the existing map data to add cycle routes or tracks


6

OpenCycleMap, based on OpenStreetMap, is another resource you might consider. It uses a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license, which is why many of the mobile applications actually use the OpenCycleMap data. Anyone can register and contribute to OpenCycleMap, so in that sense it is like Wikipedia, in that it is often more up-to-date. Just looking ...


6

You can now participate in updating Google Maps to the point of adding streets and updating information, using Google Map Maker. While there is community bureaucracy to learn, you can now indeed participate directly.


6

I usually make my map before and upload it on my garmin, i have the same map on my phone via google map in case i need more details (which I keep in my backpocket). If i don't want to go to a certain location but just want to ride, I let my garmin goes and use the "return home" feature when it start to get late.


6

Have you tried "Get there by bike"? http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/get-there-by-bike-interactive/id457288250?mt=8 The few times i tried it i had good results. Another alternative, but i have not used yet. http://www.bikemapsapp.com/


6

You could use ridewithgps to build your map. It allows you to drag waypoints off the main route and re-routes (can be used without auto routing as well if you prefer). You'll have to pay if you want to print from their site. However, you can print a cue sheet free or export the saved map in GPX or TCX format to print with another application or website ...


5

Zip tie + Binder Clip on Stem clamping to a 1 Gallon Ziplock Plastic bag with properly folded map inside. Alternatively, if that's not secure enough, use 2 binder clips + zip ties on the handlebars. I found a similar DIY setup using velcro wire ties via Oaklahoma bicycle Society


5

I mostly use it for tracking rides after the fact, but Ride With GPS has cue sheets and route planning based off of Google maps for their paying members. From the GPS side, it works great, your mileage may vary for pre-planning.


5

Just verified that the 510 can be attached to power while on/in use. It continues to operate. When the external power source is removed, it will give a message to that effect, but does not power down (like the nuvi/car versions do). Note that you (obviously) have to open the weather seal to plug in power. Also worth noting, the 510 will go into a different ...


4

You can get an elevation profile of a route from using Google Maps and GPS Visualiser, as detailed on Aaron James Young's blog. In summary: Create your route on Google Maps. Grab the link, and stick it into GPS Visualiser. Bingo! An elevation profile chart is created showing how the altitude changes over the route.


4

I'd forget the map holder, it's just extra bulk and complexity that you're better off without in an AR. Fold the map up small enough so you can just hold it in your hand while riding. It takes a little practice but you'll get used to it. No need to put it in a waterproof map case unless it's raining, and even then most AR maps (usually mytopo in my ...


4

Go to http://connect.garmin.com, and click on the "Explore" link. Type in the region that you're interested in, and you'll see bike routes that others have ridden on. It's a great way to find new routes and there's very detailed GPS data (and elevation profiles!) available for each one of those routes. Here's an example of routes that I found for my ...


4

The San Francisco Bicycle Coalition has a SF Bike Map & Walking Guide that they'll give you if you join, or you can buy it at just about any bike shop in SF or online. (and the online version at that link isn't bad). It's got bicycle-friendly routes color-coded. They also have various organized rides and other events. SF Bike Coalition and 511.org ...


4

They do not have an app, but I typically use the Course Creator on http://bikeroutetoaster.com/ to plan new rides. It gives you elevation profile and will allow you to print the cue sheets. You can export the GPX/TCX data to upload to a GPS device for on screen turn by turn cues (depending on your device). Another good option for finding new routes is to ...


4

If you are in the UK, use CycleStreets. It's a free journey-planning website designed specifically for cycling, so it can route you across off-road cycle tracks and bridges, and it gives you a choice of faster routes for more confident cyclists, and quieter routes if you want to avoid traffic. As well as the main and a mobile website, they have free apps for ...


3

If you want to submit large amounts of data, you might be able to do it using their Base Map Partner Program. I haven't tried this myself. See my answer to the question "Do I have to simply wait for google maps to add cycling directions to my area? Or can I help?".


3

Good quality road maps will differentiate between paved and unpaved roads. I really like my Gazetteer State Maps


3

If you have an iPhone or an Android phone there are various free options, some based on OpenStreetMaps, but even Google's own solution is excellent. For google maps you can download areas to store locally (for those areas you know you will have no connectivity) and it is free! I'm playing a lot of Ingress at the moment, which requires 10 - 20 hour stints ...


3

You can get map files that work on Garmin devices (I haven't tried with Edge) from this site. You can select predefined areas (countries, provinces) of the world you want, or create custom selections of just your area. They generate a map of your desired area and send you an email when its ready so you can download it.


2

I can see that nobody has yet mentioned http://www.bikeroutetoaster.com which I use for route creation before I head out on an unknown territory. Slowdown uphill calculation based on steepness The best thing about it is that you can set few parameters (defaults are quite fine for advanced recreation) and it calculates timing based on these parameters which ...


2

If you really want the super-deluxe map-holder with extra-special swivel feature, here it is: http://www.klickfix.com/index.php?mod=1&lang=en That is a Rixen and Kaul Freeliner and it detaches with their 'Klickfix' system. A lot of map holders may not be best suited to going cross-country on an MTB. A lot will be rattling up front with the R+K ...



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