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14

If you are using a bike with a derailleur the number of cogs on the rear hub will determine the chain size you will need. They are always 3/32" chains. You can get a 5/6/7-speed, 8-speed, 9-speed, or 10-speed chains. If you can't find a chain that matches your cluster pick a chain for a larger number, for example if you have an eight-cog cluster you can ...


12

Assuming you want the center of gravity of the bike alone (not with a rider), there is a very simple procedure you can perform yourself, as long as you have some bike (you could borrow one): For simplicity, strap the front wheel to the down tube of the bike, so the handlebars won't turn; You could also strap the brake levers in the "full braking" position; ...


11

I had a similar problem on my Pugsley, though it was under braking (discs) that I was kicking the wheel around in the dropouts. After talking with the guys at my LBS, I learned that I wasn't putting enough force into the quick release. They said that a good, tight, clamp should leave an imprint of the lever on your palm when you close it. It will be ...


11

Usually when I talk about or hear someone use the term 'Master Link' they mean something like this: They are links that can be seperated without the use of a specialized chain tool to push a pin through the rollers. There are others besides those shown, one of the more common being an SRAM Power Link which looks like this: If you don't have a link like ...


10

There are two basic adjustments that apply to all types of rim brakes (v-brakes, cantilevers, calipers): Tension: The cable tension from the brake lever to the brakes adjusts how responsive your brakes feel. Tighten it up and both brake pads will engage sooner and the braking action will be harder. Loosen it up and braking will feel spongy and you may not ...


9

If it is easy to get the bike to a bike shop, it is worth asking the shop out much a replacement is. It is not likely to be more than a few $. Otherwise take the old bracket to the bike shop to get the replacement to match. If the bike shop is able to do the replacement on the spot, let them do it and watch how it is done, otherwise it is not hard to do ...


8

If your derailleur is adjusted properly, and you are slipping gears, it's usually a worn chain and rear cog. Take the bike into your local bike shop, and they can help you get replacements.


8

I'd try a screw remover like these. You'll need to either get a set or bring the bolt in to make sure you get the right size (Sears sells their own version that's supposed to be excellent). The good ones have a left-hand thread and a small cutting head to bite into the bead of the bolt; this looks like a really good candidate for a screw remover since the ...


7

There are many possible causes of creaking. But Deemar has the most likely reason in this case - the cranks are loose on the axle. Think about how a creak is produced. It's one item sliding over another. But instead of sliding it's repeatedly sticking then jumping. The amount of movement might only be a fraction of a millimetre. The OP would have noticed if ...


7

Did you change the chain after the first derailleur broke? If the same chain was on and you're positive the derailleur didn't connect with the spokes, then the chain is a likely culprit. Another thing to watch out for is loose pannier straps (or anything else that could get caught in the chain and take out the derailleur).


7

I use Q-tips and a degreaser (WD40 or similar will work). Spray on, wipe off. Soaking helps cut hard to remove grime.


7

In theory they are more efficient. Throughout the pedal stroke your leg doesn't give an equal amount of force - ideally you want to spend most of the time pushing down with the big thigh muscles and a minimum time in the horizontal movements at the top and bottom of the stroke. Elliptical front cogs give you a more up-down leg motion, so more time with ...


7

The correct length of a chain is irrelevant at purchase since they all come at a set length. (Usually 114 1/2" links, sometimes 120 1/2" links). In special cases, like tandems and recumbents, you may need to join 2 chains to have enough length. Sizing a chain to length for a particular bike is a set process. It does vary a bit. In the case of an IGH ...


6

Replacing a tire isn't that hard, but it will take a few times for it to seem like second-nature. If you have a road bike with skinny high-pressure tires, you can expect that the tires will be harder to remove and replace. This is how I do it on my touring bike, offroad bikes, cruiser, and folding bikes. You'll need a pump to match the valves used on your ...


6

Ok, a number of the other responses have captured some of the possibilities here. The possible causes and fixes I can think of are: Worn Cassette, which is also usually associated with a worn chain. If this is the issue there are two key indicators that you will see. The first is that the gap between the teeth on the sprockets will look less like a "U" and ...


6

To add on to Mike's answer, slipping is probably due to your chain being old. As a result of your chain being old, it has probably worn down the teeth on the rear cassete (you should be able to examine it and see grooves and uneven wear on the gears you use the most). Replace both the chain and cassete, then get yourself a chain wear indicator and check it ...


6

Are the skewers internal-cam or external-cam? Internal-cam QR skewers have more mechanical advantage and allow for more clamping force. They're also less affected by dirt and crud. If you don't have internal-cam skewers, get some. All you ever wanted to know about skewers, courtesy of Sheldon Brown.


6

I have seen this a few times where the axle is just a tad too long. No matter how tight you clamp your QR, it won't be snug enough. Did you buy the frame and build it up yourself? If it is the axle, you can pop the wheel out, remove the QR and take a file to one end or the other. Another possibility is the the wheel was built incorrectly and the axle ...


6

if you are positive it's coming form the bottom bracket, and you have already R&R'd them, try using Teflon tape instead (plumber’s tape), wrap it around the cups and reinstall them - this should fix any squeaks in the BB.


6

I think Shimano integrated shifters ("brifters") for the front derailleur on a triple normally have 5 indexed positions: 1-3-5 are the main positions that match the chainrings and 2-4 are intermediate spots to avoid chain rub for some chainring+sprocket combinations. If you give the front shift lever a short pull it will click once and the front derailleur ...


6

These hitches don't work very well. They don't grab tightly enough, so they can twist around the bar and bump in to the wheel. As they twist they will take off the paint. They also require a lot of turns to attach and remove. I had two trailers with this kind of hitch, and 3 bikes to pull with. I bought this Burley flex connector for each trailer: I used ...


6

I personally think that its a little subjective how often one would strip down a setup. I believe it really depends on riding styles, type & range of equipment and also sometimes events. Riding Styles I personally do freeride and XC. My FR (mostly street) setup receives more attention due to the abuse I put it through (i am heeavy!) - though, I dont ...


5

I consider it standard practice to replace the rear cogs at the same time as buying a new chain. If you don't the rear cog's teeth start to look like shark fins after a while and your chain will "climb". Esp. when pedaling backwards. Edit: worn cogs, even if they don't cause immediate problems, will stretch your chain causing it to wear out quickly.


5

Are you sure the creak is coming from your cranks? It could be the rear hub, it could be the pedals themselves, it could be some combination of things which when you put your weight on them causes a creak. Are you putting extra weight on the bars when you get the creak. I've had creaks from: the seatpost, the headset, the rear hub, the front hub, the ...


5

It sounds like the cranks are loose on the spindle - hence the creak every pedal stroke / 180 degrees. If the cranks have been loose for a while, then the action of riding the bike will have usually rounded either the square taper on the spindle, or the hole on the cranks. If this has happened, then you will never be able to tighten that set of cranks up ...


5

Just go grab yourself a tube repair kit. They usually come with a few patches, some rubber cement, and something to scuff up the rubber of the tube. Next, scuff up the tube around the puncture so that the cement can stick. Apply the cement around the puncture and make sure to let it dry. Then put the patch on and apply plenty of pressure for about a ...


5

This is probably down to the gear cables. If the cables are new they may have stretched a little and you'll need to take the slack out by adjusting the tension, you usually do this with a barrel adjuster either at the shifter or inline in the shifter cable. If the cables have been on the bike for some time then the problem is probably sticky cables, ...


5

I think your best bet will be an appropriate diameter brass thread cleaning brush: Amazon sells a few options, but a local hardware store will probably have more options.


5

Before answering your question I will add the caveat that without seeing your problem and without knowing the exact spec of the bike, this 'quote' could be wrong. For one, you might not have replaceable chainrings. But, assuming you do have replaceable chainrings the cost would be somewhere around 30-35$ (10$ labor, 20-25$ for chainring) depending on the ...



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