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9

250-260 pounds isn't that heavy. You may not need to worry about weight at all. See if you can find the information from the manufacturer about weight limits for their bikes. For a mountain bike that you intend to use for what it was made for, you're probably within the weight limit the bike is designed for. You may want to avoid the lightest weight stuff ...


9

Most scientific studies on cycling and urogenital problems are written with clinicians in mind, to make them aware of possible symptoms that they will encounter. Often these studies get summarized into review articles. One such article (Leibovitch and Mor, 2005), reviewed 62 relevant studies. They say: The reported incidence of bicycling related ...


7

Yes, but only in fairly extreme cases. According to this article, cyclists who regularly cover more than 186 miles (300km) per week are likely to have fertility problems. If you're not doing that kind of mileage then I don't think you've got too much to worry about. Edit: I've just found this essay - Great balls of fire and the vicious cycle: A study of ...


6

Don't go full suspension - it at $1000 price point its a gimmick, and at your weight, you would need highend stuff for it to be adjustable enough to be useful. I am sure you can spend less, (I ride off-road with a guy who's 220lbs, hes really fit and all muscle, rides hard and fast. His sub $1000 bike stays in one piece), unless you are looking for serious ...


6

At 6'6" you're probably going to be looking at the top end of most manufacturers size ranges, road frames of 62cm and above are the range you'll be looking at. I said "probably" though, you would do best getting yourself to a local shop that knows something about fitting people to frames. Being so far from the average height I'd not risk buying something ...


4

I agree with the others: your weight is not that much of an issue for a decent quality well under $1k bike. I'm 175lbs now, but when I first started riding at 360lbs I rode a Specialized Big Hit Mountain bike. About $1,600 and overkill for the on-road riding I did. I now use a simple Trek Hybrid, and love it.. no clunky clumsy mountain bike.. (unless of ...


3

As someone who weighs in at 375lbs, I can tell you that a good build will hold up just fine. I would stay away from box-store bikes (Walmart, K-Mart, etc) and shady bike shops, as they tend to cut corners in components and overall build quality. Hit up your local bike shop and let them know your worries. A good bike shop will probably have some great ...


3

You really should go to a couple of good LBS's and get fit. They'll be able to recommend some different companies that make bikes that will fit your build. There are so many different variables besides just height that it's impossible to recommend a brand based on what you've given. You need to know your stack and reach in order to find the best geometry for ...


2

You might look into something like the Kona Hoss, which I believe is no longer made but can probably be found used. Here are some reviews on MTBR. The most critical thing to selecting a bike will be getting strong wheels, crankset, seat & post, pedals, and fork. These are the components that bear most of your weight. You can probably start with almost ...


2

As others have suggested, bike fit, padded shorts, anatomical saddle, etc. When it comes to bike fit, consider the tilt of the saddle: try tilting the nose of the saddle down. If it's above level, or even level, you'll exacerbate nerve compression with the small surface area of the nose. Don't tilt it too far down or as you slip forward you'll constantly ...


2

First thing to come to mind is poor bike fit.Second is are you wearing cycling shorts?If you bought the bike at a local shop see if they offer a fitting service.If they don't see if they will show you how to make some adjustments to the saddle height,forward-aft,and angle so you can experiment to see what makes improvements


1

If you're just getting back into riding after a long break, this is normal. It'll still happen for a while - especially on longer and longer rides as you build up your endurance. There may be some fit issues there, but if you get a saddle with a cutout and your fit looks good (and there's no sharp pain) then you may just need to build up your tolerance a ...


1

SOMA makes good quality affordable frames and their ES comes in 66cm. I'm only 6'4 but long in the limbs and I rode that on an extended tour just fine. The frame will probably set you back $400 or so which should leave room to kit it out.


1

Nothing "off the shelf" is going to fit perfectly for you. To mitigate, you'll want to experiment with long seatposts that have set-backs and long stems. Since you're a marathoner, you're probably quite fit and are limber enough to deal with handle bars that are far lower than the seat. This lower stack height will also help you not be so cramped. ...



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