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26

Bicycle mirrors are going fall into two basic categories- the type that you mount somewhere on your bike and the type that you mount somewhere on your head. Both categories have their pros and cons, but many of them are subjective. A pro to one individual may be considered a con to the next. Within those two categories you have a variety of different options ...


18

You should use a rearview mirror because: It allows you to look behind you by moving just your eyes. This will help you not accidentally swerving into the traffic coming up behind you you're trying to get a look at. You can (almost) look behind you and in front of you at the same time because it just takes a small eye movement rather than a huge head ...


10

Yes, they exist, though they are expensive and meant for racing rather than for general purpose riding on regular roads. One example is the View Speed Cyclops glasses. They take a lot of getting used to but in the arcane world of time-trial racing they have their adherents.


9

An argument against the use of mirrors is that when you turn your head to look behind you prior to moving across a lane of traffic for example, any drivers behind you will see your head turn and get some indication you're going to do something; whereas with a mirror, the drivers behind you don't see you checking the traffic and assume you're riding straight. ...


8

I would say that there's not much more concern of the mirror gouging your eye out than your glasses in the event of an accident. Ultimately I think if you did a risk/benefit assessment of having a mirror, you'd come out in the black. For most cycling mirrors I'd say that the mounting point is going to give way before anything breaks and becomes dangerous. If ...


6

To add to jm2's post, there's also a mirror that is integrated into a bar: Advantages: Foldable, unobtrusive, usage as bar Disadvantage: Small mirror => very limited field of vision


5

Who doesn't take at least a passing interest in beautiful members of the opposite or even the same sex? We all do to varying degrees. Theoretically a mirror could help out with such window shopping, it could also help out getting one's hair and make-up right, much like those vanity mirrors they have in car sun-shields.


5

I use a mirror (a CycleAware Reflex) because, as others have said, it allows me to see what's coming behind me. Where I ride, the "bike lanes" are little more than poorly maintained pavement on the side of the road. So when it is safe, i.e., no traffic, I ride to the right in the roadway. I tried bar-end mirrors and glasses-mounted mirrors, but I didn't ...


4

This is complicated. The farther from the eye a mirror is, the larger it must be to provide an adequate field of view. This is one of the (several) reasons that bar-mounted mirrors are often unsatisfactory. Assuming you stick with helmet-mounted, you do want to get the largest mirror you can find, and one with a relatively long arm, so you can get it as ...


3

I have used a bar-end mounted mirror for about one high-mileage year in the past, and have for the last year switched to helmet mounted. I will not consider the merit of handlebar vs. helmet mounted in detail, but I can say I would never have used the handlebar mounted one in the first place, if I knew how much, MUCH better, by so much far, the helmet ...


3

I would be very tempted to say that your bike isn't setup correctly for you. It shouldn't cause any back/neck issues after a long ride (although you don't say how long that is). If you handlebars/stem is of the correct length/height, then you shouldn't have any issues seeing in front of you- nor pains in these areas. To answer your question- I am unaware of ...


2

I have a balaclava that's somewhat loose, and gives me the same problems. I assume the fabric of the sun drape is both interfering with the mirror as well as cutting out a bit of your peripheral vision? If this is the case, then we have the same problem. You have, essentially, three choices: What works for me is to simply pull the clava tighter against my ...


2

I use an eyeglass mounted mirror (I use the "Take a look" mirror, I highly recommend it), and the only time I was in an accident with it, it popped off my glasses without gouging me in the eye. Any up/down motion of the mirror is going to make it pop right off of the glasses, lateral side-to-side motion will likely just bend the metal shaft. If my face hits ...


2

I'm adding my voice to those for mirrors. I've used a bar-end mirror for some time while riding with 1) a child trailer attached 2) a companion on another bike behind me most of the time (I was the pace setter due to the trailer). It's invaluable, and I sorely miss it while riding my other bike, with or without a trailer attached. The model I've used: ...


2

A mirror is a great addition to a cyclist's toolkit. While all cyclists should be able to look around behind them without one, a mirror lets you do this more often and safely. And a mirror is no substitute for looking behind you anyway. Here's a summary of the kinds of mirrors I've used. Glasses-mounted mirrors like the take-a-look mirror are great for ...


1

Yeah, I've tried them all, and keep coming back to the helmet mirror. An eyeglass mount is less stable and doesn't project out from the head as far, so it's hard to see around a bulky helmet (and it seems all helmets these days are bulky). I've tried handlebar mirrors of several varieties, but on my touring bike with drop bars no mirror I've tried is ...


1

As mentioned in this answer, I use a helmet mounted mirror. I get a good field of view behind me and have gotten used to using a quick side-to-side glance to see everything behind me. The mirror has a mount that adheres to my helmet, and the mirror arm snaps on and off for travel. I tried a handlebar-mounted mirror prior to that. I found that I couldn't ...


1

A mirror is not necessary if you're capable of swiveling your head to look around without changing the line-of-travel of the bike. This is a skill that can be learned with a modicum of experience. The problem with using a mirror is that it is one more piece of equipment to carry and fuss with.



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