Hot answers tagged

12

I think the terms used here are a bit confused. Rather than saying that a road bike has 22 "gears", you should be saying that it has 22 "speeds" (or more correctly, as pointed out in the comments, "gear ratios" is the technically correct most accurate term (when people say 'gear', they are using it as short for 'gear ratios')). Even that can be a bit ...


8

Other? I would not count protection as the first. The cage is a lever and some edges. A water bottle is not exactly an impact attenuator. And you have the chain ring to get past. You pretty much only see a third on touring bikes. It is the least convenient location but it is a third location. Three bottles or a frame bag and one bottle. Pretty much ...


7

Have think about your bike fit, I once had horrendous ITB pain from setting my seatpost just a few mm too high. There's plenty of conflicting advice and opinions you can research. As well, are you doing any pre/post ride stretching or body care? I use a foam roller on my legs, just a few minutes in the morning and evening (I commute to work & back) does ...


7

Depends on your budget, your requirements, and your mechanical aptitude. Plus how far down the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades you want to do on a BSO bike. Since the crank is riveted together, its unlikely to accept any bolt-on replacement chainrings. Though its possible the makers used rivets instead of bolts but used normal bolt chainrings. You'll ...


7

Sometimes I carry a fuel bottle down there when touring. It is out of the way and if the bottle happens to leak it doesn't cause much trouble – certainly not like having a leaking bottle of white gas in a pannier…


5

The main advantage is that it gives you an extra water bottle. Being lower down means that if you are swinging the bike from side to side it has less effect - this isn't about the 1kg being part of the total 100kg rolling mass, it's 1kg on a 10kg bike when you're out of the saddle on a climb. Tourists often spend considerable effort on carrying water, ...


4

My Google-Fu comes up with the 1991 Alpinestar Ti Mega. It looks like they made an aluminum version as well. The tube shapes look to be about the same. Might be a good starting point for you.


4

You say "Surely the brakes should always be used to near maximum stopping power". This is where the first need for modulation comes from. Stopping power has at least as much to do with grip between the wheel and the road than the torque your brakes can except on the wheel. Maximum stopping power comes from the front wheel (plenty of discussion about that ...


4

If by efficiency you mean braking power then yes maximum braking power is right at the verge of locking up. Braking does not need to be performed at maximum braking power. Often you don't need to slow down or stop as fast as possible. There is static and kinetic friction. Kinetic is when the wheel skids. Kinetic friction is lower so once you start to ...


4

Short answer: you multiply the number of front chainrings by the number of cogs at the back. That bike with two chainrings and 11 cogs on the cassette has 2x11 gears = 22, rather than just 11. Bike Gears Explained has lots more detail and this diagram: You can see that for each of the three chainrings every cog on the back can be used. In this case that ...


4

Those look standard to me. The saddle you're looking at is designed to pivot as the lever moves to the cable itself isn't bent (because it would fray quickly). The smaller hole on the top is there so you can see what's happening, and on the underside is a larger hole with a slot so that you can get the cable end in and out. How the cable end its once the ...


3

So I finally got lucky and this solution has worked for a few months now. I ended up with a Mavic A719 with Sapim Strong spokes and a spoke freeze as well as the thickest Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyre they could fit on the wheel. It was built by Mamachari Bikes in Dalston, London. I've been having no problems with it since a few months now. I think using the ...


3

If you remove the stickers it might help show you any branding. It LOOKS like a reasonably decent, slightly old school mountain bike. The kind worth handing down. People are debating if its a BSO. This means Bike Shaped Object, which is derogatory term for rubbish bikes sold in supermarkets etc. It looks better than that, branded forks and decent ...


3

You'd probably get a good information by looking at the components. Assuming the components are original, you can tell a lot information about the general quality of the frame from the quality components. Almost nobody is putting DuraAce on a cheap Walmart frame, and almost nobody is putting Tourney parts on a Cervello. The bolt on wheels and ProMax crank ...


3

Bikes break because they've been either mistreated or not cared for. Riding a bike down stairs should be okay provided you don't fall off or catch anything.... that's what a MTB is built for. Proper care and maintenance keeps everything working, so lubrication and washing off mud/silt etc will keep the bike functioning. Storing your bike inside out of the ...


3

It's more likely a combination of the front wheel hitting before you had time to react properly and unweight it, and you also probably pushed down on the handlebars to shift your body back ready to do that. Even just the first could have been enough to pinch flat your tyre. There's a whole lot of more factors, from the size and pressure of your tyres, what ...


2

My friend had one, definitely Alpinestar. The forks are probably newer than '91, look like mid-90's Manitou's. The stock fork was probably rigid, someone swapped it out with the suspension fork.


2

The principle is very similar to braking Front wheel: when front wheel hit an obstacle, the speed of bicycle suddenly decreases. The centre of mass would shifted even more towards front wheel, making it harder to roll over an object (easier to brake). This contributes to a larger impact, comparing to the rear wheel. Rearwheel: as weight is shifted towards ...


2

Between mass and aerodynamics you would be expending a ton more energy on the MTB if the roads are in decent shape. Rather than roadify the MTB you might consider MTBifying a road bike. Tires are the key, really large, supple ones to soak up the bumps, at an appropriate pressure. Perhaps aiming for tubular cx tires that you can run really low pressures on.


2

In the hypothetical case where you can get accurately from zero braking to edge of traction, you still need to consider jerk: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerk_(physics), especially part "Physiological effects and human perception of physical jerk". In reality, you still need modulation to adapt to differences in traction. Also, your XT brakes are fine and ...


1

My experience with Lefty goes back to 2000 when I purchased my Cannondale Super V. One thing I've liked about it how easy it is to 'turn off'. There's a small dial at the top that disengages the suspension - good when transitioning onto solid road riding. As mentioned above by another post, the center of balance is altered. The implication of which is ...


1

So you "just don't like the general feel". Over the long haul soaking up a lot of the potholes, ruts and rough roads will not pay off. That comfort is sucking up power and adds weight to the bicycle. Have fun and you may flat out overpower some riders but it is not going to be a competitive bike. Gravel racers and bike manufactures have come to what is ...


1

I have the same problem, and the problem is Shimano. Shimano shift/brake lever combo use a larger cable end, if the small style(most aftermarket ones) is used, you can experience brake binding and lock up and result in a no brake situation. The best solution is to replace the cable with the proper Shimano one. The Shimano (doesn't need to be Shimano brand, ...


1

Inherently, a lack of modulation provides a lack of "feel" to your braking. That lack of feel translates into an On or Off level of braking rather than a gradual application of the brakes. Accurate braking to scrub of speed means faster cornering out on the trails (or road). Carrying the right amount of speed into corners means carrying more speed out of ...


1

You aren't going to be able to get those rivets out and replace the smallest chainring; it's not going to happen. Chainrings and the holes for the bolts are designed for tight tolerances and you'll never get it back together in a functional manner. Do I think you should try? Absolutely.


1

To help you answer your first question, do you think i can beat non fixie bike with this or should i buy new bike? Leave your current geared bike in one gear combination for the day and see if you like it. Ride a route you're familiar with and know your average time. Ride your bike in this one gear combination, did you beat your time or was it ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible