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36

The following list contains the basic characteristics and differences for the aforementioned types of MTBs plus 2 types of bikes that you didn't mention. Note that I've tried to summarise and "average" the characteristics of modern MTBs used today by amateurs and pros. So 9 kgs for XC bikes means that you can easily find 8 and 11 kg ones. Cross country (XC) ...


33

As you mentioned, one of the primary differences between a Presta and Schrader valves are the diameters--with Schrader valves being slightly larger--and therefore the valve holes on bicycle rims are drilled to suit one size or another. Your foremost concern with using a Presta valve in a rim drilled for a Shrader valve shouldn't be 'movement' of the valve ...


29

There are basically four solutions that do not involve extensive work on your bike: Roll up the pant-leg on the gear-side high enough to stay away from the gears. Wear tight fitting cycling pants that don't flap. Use braces as you have, or clips such as these to keep your flappy pants close enough to your legs. Stuff the pant-leg on the gear side in your ...


27

If you can imagine a compromise between a mountain bike that is light weight and easy to pedal, versus one with that is strong and has lots of suspension travel to tackle rougher terrain you might get a diagram such as the one below. As we go from category to category we get heavier bikes that are harder to pedal, but that can handle rougher and rougher ...


26

I haven't tried them specifically with goatheads, but I've run through nails, staples, glass and just about anything else you could find in an urban environment on Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires. I have never had a flat over thousands of miles with their Marathon Supremes, either--and they're much lighter and better riding--but they're not as puncture-proof ...


25

A mountain bike will never really be a road bike. The geometry and construction of the frame is different. Mountain bike frames are designed for a different posture and are often designed for a suspension fork, as well as generally being beefier. You can set up a mountain bike with slick tires and drop bars if you want. I've tried this before and the ride ...


25

First off, when riding over rough terrain you should be hovering above your saddle, not sitting on the saddle. This holds whether riding a hard tail (no rear suspension) or riding a full suspension bike. If you are sitting you have less ability to move your weight around, and therefore less control of the bike. When sitting it is easy for a large bump to ...


24

Tire pressure is generally a trade-off between three things: Rolling resistance (more pressure == rolls easier) Pinch flat resistance (more pressure == less chance for the tube to tear when a rock squashes the tire toward the rim) Grip (with less pressure, the tire can conform better to rocks, roots, and other terrain giving a larger contact surface) If ...


24

The question of big box bike quality to one side, the question should be not whether it's "appropriate" to ride this bike, but whether you like it. Are you physically comfortable riding the bike? If so, great! If not, there are several questions here about bike fit that may help you get comfortable on the bike. A bike that doesn't fit you will never be a ...


22

It's common etiquette, at least everywhere I've been, to stay away from wet and muddy trails (unless they're supposed to be or always are a mudfest). Riding on a muddy trail makes ruts which make the trail conditions worse for everyone once the mud dries and the ground hardens. In addition to ruts, if the trail is muddy and you slide out a front wheel going ...


21

I switched to using Specialized Armadillo a while ago because of frequent punctures, and I haven't had any since making the switch. I'd highly recommend them.


21

Best? Doesn't seem like there's any one right answer. Pros for carrying on bike: Weight is on the bike, not you Doesn't make your back all sweaty No adjustments necessary Generally easier to clean Easier to choose alternate beverage options (with the right bottle) Easier to just always have a water bottle on the bike (one less thing to worry about ...


21

Keep on riding. Ideally every couple days. If you can't ride, do some other form of cardio exercise, such as going for a walk. I'll bet a couple days after that ride you'll find the same distance a little easier and might even be able to go a little further. Get a day of rest. If you've pushed yourself really hard and you're "done", take a day off before ...


21

The back wheel is the wheel bearing most of the weight and also the wheel providing the driving force. For these 2 reasons it is likely that the forces being exerted between the wheel and surface are much greater on the rear wheel than on the front. This makes it more likely that you will get punctures on the rear wheel than the front - all other things ...


20

Get a printed map and look for the 'postal roads'... There are 'postal roads' in Switzerland that are closed to normal cars. These go over some high passes that are just not wide enough for regular traffic. They are called 'postal roads' because only the post bus goes on them. What is amazing about them is the descents - you can ride 'TdF' style without ...


19

The usual trail etiquette rules are, basically: Cyclists yield to everybody Everybody yields to horses If you're both cyclists (or both hikers, etc), somebody going downhill yields to somebody going uphill So as a pedestrian going uphill on a narrow path, the cyclists were supposed to yield to you. However, if you looked like you were stepping off the ...


19

The shorter the distance between the bottom bracket and saddle lowers pedalling efficiency, but increases standover height which gives you more room to throw the bike around. This feature gets more pronounced as the riding style the bike is designed for becomes more aggressive i.e. an enduro frame will sacrifice some pedalling efficiency for stability over ...


18

You can get a set of slicks or semi-slick tires that will reduce your rolling resistance. If you're using it to commute lots as well then fenders are awesome to keep the rain off. I have a snap on rear fender that goes on any bike I'm riding if it's raining (outside of races). I hate having a wet butt.


18

Riding in snow depends on a bunch of factors, so you won't really ever be able to know unless you just go for it and try it out. What bike/wheels you have Should be obvious. Mountain vs Road, 26" vs 29", wide vs skinny tires, etc Your skill level in snow The better and more comfortable you are in the snow is important. I'd say its the most important ...


18

If we assume that both models are at about the same price point, here is what you can expect: The hardtail will be substantially lighter than a comparably priced full-suspension bike. The hardtail will likely have a higher level of components and possibly a better front shock because of the increased expense associated with the full suspension frame. ...


18

-20C is -4F, cold enough to be uncomfortable for humans, but not particularly cold for mechanical equipment. You will notice that lubricants get stiffer, but generally they warm up rapidly when you ride and the stiffness will be gone in a minute or two. Hydraulic fluids, et al, should be good to -35C or below, though they will stiffen before that, ...


18

First of all you need to tell the LBS (local bike shop) that the disk can be "fixed". Then you need to find another LBS because they are either amateurs or are simply trying to make you buy stuff that you don't need. You need to remove the oily disk from the bike and use a bike degreaser or alcohol on it to remove all oil. Rub with a clean dry cloth or ...


17

If, by stands, you mean bike mounted kickstands, then the reason most mountain bikers don't use them is three fold: Safety. The kickstand is usually a relatively cheap piece of metal, bolted on wherever it will fit. Its shape and style lend themselves to ending up in your wheel or otherwise damaging the bike, if they are not secured to the frame so they ...


17

I happen to be one of those who attract new riders into the sport, and have given the basic training to many people. Here is a brief of what I try to teach them: Riding position Be ready to react Have your bike properly tuned/fitted Scan the terrain(Look forward) Use a proper braking technique Never get to the extremes Grow progressively The most ...


17

You turn it on when riding on smooth surfaces or going up hill to improve pedal efficiency. It's hard to know if you will need it in advance because without riding the bike you won't know how well the suspension design handles pedal bob (the energy lost by the bike suspension compressing under pedal forces), try and get a test ride.


16

Weight distribution is critical, and it is a bit of a fine balance, much like doing a track stand. I find that it is easiest to do this by staying seated and crouching towards the front of the bike. Standing on the pedals will tend to put your weight too far forward and make it difficult to achieve smooth power transfer to the wheels. Smooth Power Transfer ...


16

This choice really does depend on what kind of terrain you will be riding on. I'm also assuming you are intending to buy a quality full suspension bike. Anything under like $800-$1,000 USD, don't bother. Go hard tail with a good fork. The bumpier the terrain, the more a full suspension bike will help suck up the hard hits. You can really fly over rocks and ...


16

Keep riding. It will take a little while to come back, but it will come back. Just don't push yourself too hard, as you will be tense and stiff and those things can lead to another accident. For all practical purposes your skill limit has decreased, so riding at your old limit is riding beyond your limit until you get past the mental block caused by the ...


16

In german this is called "Hinterrad versetzen" -- "displacing the back wheel". I got to learn this in an mtb course I took a while back. If you can, try to find an instructor or other experienced rider to teach you. How to practice: Start very, very small and always wear full protective gear, i.e. a full-face helmet and vest in case you crash. You will ...


15

Although this is purely anecdotal, I know from my own experience mountain biking that most of my flats were from so-called "pinch flats" (where the tube is pierced by pinching or friction with the tire/rim rather than piercing by an external object). This was highly annoying. After having switched to tubeless some years ago, I've not yet had a single flat. ...



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