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5

A few quick points about the article The author did not provide all the math and formulations so we need to take it on faith that the correct formulae were used and there are not implementation errors. The author also only considered one bike, the 2015 Giant Reign 27.5". Finally, the results seem reasonable to me. The main take home from the article ...


3

I would guess, without seeing a photo (if my explain explanation below doesn't work, perhaps you could post one), that what has happened is that the chain has doubled back on itself. It will look like it is tangled, but in fact it is not. Let me try to explain how to sort it out… Pick a spot on the chain to start, I'd suggest where it comes off of the ...


3

Actually, I don't believe it's a Stumpjumper, I think it is a 2001 Specialized S-Works FSR XC.


2

I'm an MTB rider who occasionally got into a Road Bike for 60 km rides. (5 hours aprox). From experience I would advise several short rides before a very long one. Ride until you feel uncomfortable and keep going for another 10-15 minutes but don't let yourself get into [severe] pain. For example: Get two 30+ minutes a week for 2 weeks, then grow to two ...


2

There are a variety of bikes with the same wheelsize. A few companies, such as Surly, still make mountain bikes with 26" wheels. A lot make 27.5" wheels, and a ton make 29" wheel based bikes. I believe Jamis also made 26" wheel bikes until quite recently. Provided the hub spacing is the same and you have disc brakes and an appropriate rotor, you can just ...


2

Those darn spiky things are called thorns. Where I'm from there are cactuses that hide in the grass in some places and are notorious for puncturing bike tires. The solution is to use tire sealant in your tubes. Out here most people use "Slime," you can buy slime brand tubes or just buy the slime and inject it in through your valve. It works almost instantly, ...


1

An easy answer directly from Schwalbe website: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/profil.html "Many MTB tires are marked with a “FRONT” and a “REAR” arrow. The “FRONT” arrow indicates the recommended rolling direction for the front wheel and respectively the “REAR” arrow is the direction for the rear wheel."


1

The point is to get the chain untangled. Once you do that, you can remount the derailleur, feed the chain through it and you are home. Tangles are hard. Even a photo won't help. The good news is that there isn't too much to play with, so just playing should get you there.


1

The size of a bike has very little to do with the wheel size. For example, if you look at the Surly Instigator with 26 inch wheels, the smallest size has an effective top tube of 55.5 cm, and a reach of 37.8 cm. Compare that to the Trek X-Calibre which on the smallest model uses 27.5 inch wheels but has an effective top tube of 52.5 mm and a reach of 35.2 ...


1

There are various manufacturers out there who offer puncture resistant tires and liners. All of them sacrifice weight for puncture resistance. I would highly recommend you look into running tubeless tires. When you pick up thorns, you can simply remove them, spin the wheel, add some air (if needed) and keep riding. They require much less effort if you ...


1

I generally use the cartridge brakes because I they are easier to replace. Just pull the cotter pin and slide out the old one, slide in the new one, replace the cotter pin and you are done. Don't have to re-setup the brakes. Another plus is the spares take up less space. You can get various compounds with each type. The non-cartridge type have more ...


1

There's little difference between the two types as far as braking performance is concerned, as you can easily find the same pad compound in both types. I've been able to easily find Salmon Kool Stop brake shoes that fit the vintage Mafac brakes on my Peugeot 12 speed. That being said, the one issue you may run into is the lack of the correct inserts, which ...


1

This year (age 25) I decided to start road biking having never even sat on anything but a MTB. I got persuaded into trying out a used CX first as an introduction to a more road bike geo and soon got into it. Have since bought a road bike too and absolutely love it. I started doing 20 mile rides once a week, I wasn't getting anywhere with it, but was happy ...


1

Adaptation greatly varies from person to person - are your core muscles strong, do you have good flexibility, problem in your column/shoulders, etc. It's har dto give you an answer. One think to take into account is that most road bikes force a a hard posture on the rider, on the pursuit on speed, mainly on your low back and neck. This is true for any ages. ...


1

I just went through the same adjustment process. I used to ride only mountain bikes for about 15 years. Then I got a cyclocross bike in March of this year, which we can regard as equivalent to a road bike for the purposes of this discussion. On short rides (< 1 hour) it was OK, but on longer rides my neck and shoulders started hurting a lot after about ...



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