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26

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


13

Landing on the rear wheel is a safe bet when you are not sure about the landing zone. For example a small tree root would be catastrophic if you are landing with both wheel. What happens is that since the downwards force from the fall is applied to both wheels, it is much harder to roll over the obstacle. If the front wheel cannot roll over, you basically ...


8

All those riders were doing a very specific of rear wheel landing where you land into a momentary manual (finding a balance point on the rear wheel by shifting your weight backwards and pulling on the handle bars with your arms and upper back). This lets you absorb the impact with your upper back and legs (the two biggest muscle groups in the body) as well ...


8

"Inches of travel" refers to how much the shocks can compress before hitting their limit. The more inches of travel the shocks have, the large an impact they can absorb. More travel does not automatically mean that one bike is better than another. Different riding styles and different trail conditions will require different amounts of travel.


7

This sounds like it was a very casual interaction. There's nothing wrong with what you did, but it would have been more polite to say hi and ask if they minded you drafting them for a few minutes. Even in a casual situation like that, be careful not to interfere with their rotation or their pace. IE, if you're not going to take a turn at the front, drop ...


7

For those who subscribe to the rules: "Rule 19: Introduce Yourself If you deem it appropriate to join a group of riders who are not part of an open group ride and who are not your mates, it is customary and courteous to announce your presence. Introduce yourself and ask if you may join the group. If you have been passed by a group, wait for an invitation, ...


6

The things that will make a wheel more durable in this kind of service are: Bigger tires – the bigger the tire the more space you have to cushion an impact, bigger tires also mean that the load is more distributed. Since the bigger tire gives you more support you can also run a somewhat lower pressure which means that there is more flex in the tire before ...


6

As already suggested by @Batman, have a look at this Bike Light Database write up. What to look for ... LED - with cheap lights don't believe the claimed Lumen, Look at the LED specification - a CREE XL-M T6 or U2 are probably the one you want. There's not much difference in them, you typically get about real 600 Lumen out of the cheap lights, more ...


6

I can't watch the video now, but there are two reasons to land on the rear wheel first: The first wheel to touch down is more likely to suffer a loss of control or traction. It's a common two wheel maxim that "most rear wheel slides recover, most front wheel slides crash", so you want that wheel to be the rear. It can help absorb the impact. Imagine the ...


5

I think first you should read up on the price point people recommend staying with a hard tail. Below that figure (about $US2000 depending who you speak to) Soft tails are heavy with poor rear suspension performance. Almost always, the most economic way to upgrade is to sell the current bike and buy a second hand one. The BD (if its the bike I am thinking ...


5

You will go further and faster on a road bike for the same effort. You go further and faster on a better (i.e. more expensive) bike. Training is not about going further and faster for the same effort, its about putting in more effort. So, will a road bike make a difference - only if you will put in more effort on the road bike than the MTB. If the idea of ...


3

Some points. If you bunny hop by getting both wheels to leave the ground at the same, the rear wheel has to jump the length of the obstacle plus the length of the bike to clear the obstacle. A more modern, trialsy and BMX-y bunny hop is what is what is sometimes called an 'American bunnyhop'. In this, the front is hauled up first, then the back as the ...


3

When you land you tend to go out the front rather than the back. You pretty much never land in perfect alignment and even if you do you get pushed around. If you land front wheel first the rear wheel is going to come around and only get worse. When the rear does touch it will be out of alignment. As you absorb with your arms you only get more forward ...


3

When none of the wheels of a bicycle are on the ground, the center of mass is going to accelerate downward at approximately 9.8m/s/s and there's nothing the rider can do to significantly alter that. If both wheels touch the ground while the center of mass is at the highest possible point where that can occur, there will be a severe limit as to how much ...


3

I want a bike that will allow to me ride on the road and on the rough trails I guess we can't be sure what you mean by "rough trails", but if you're talking about what I call "rough trails", a CX bike just isn't going to do it. i don't want the relaxed geometry. I want to go fast. Relaxed geometry and high speed often go together off-road (think ...


2

First I would not characterize a $1200 CX as low end. Yes since they are typically sold for race the starting point is around $1200. But overall I would not call that a low end bike. It is going to have solid frame and mid range components. I would take $1200 CX with knobby tires on the trail over $400 mountain. Not going to have a front shock on the ...


2

Landing with the rear wheel first is rarely a good idea nowadays. The video, although very "ballsy" and really of great historical importance, is very old school in regards to bike technology, terrain and rider technique. Landing with the rear first is only useful when you need to drop to flat from more than 10 feet where you need a way to absorb as much ...


2

After I made the same switch, I found I needed to check the tire pressure much more frequently, otherwise I'd get "pinch flats" all the time. Find the recommended pressure on the side of the tire and inflate to that every day you ride. Because of this, you'll need a pump with a gauge. But I'm happy I switched!


2

I see two questions here... First, will you benefit from a road bike? If you will ride it more than you are riding the mountain bike, then yes. That will depend on where you live (are there good roads or paved trails for a road bike), who you ride with, etc. I do most of my riding on my road bike because I live near an excellent paved trail and there are ...


2

Sounds like dirty pads to me, but disks can be a pain to de-squeak. The things I'd check are... Clean the rotors with alcohol, break cleaner or a bottle of ethanol from the chemist. Remove and reinsert wheels. Make sure the QRs are nice and tight, and the wheels are straight/centred properly. Check all the bolts holding your callipers to the frame/fork ...


1

Yes. Here's a tire size to rim width chart from Schwalbe.


1

According the Sheldon need 25mm for a 2.1" A downhill wheel tends to be strong (and heavier)


1

Perhaps a light weight bike and a pedal like this might help you :) AFAIK a best way to make a bunny hope is to start with a correct procedure. Low your breast on the handlebars, then push it upwards and when the time to make the rear fly arrives, link your feet on your pedals (with the teeth on it) as strong as you can and push them back. Your legs should ...


1

Permutube are not good to ride on Middle ground is a heavier puncture resistant tire if you are running racing tires Spare tubeS, tire patch, tube patches, and a pump. Tubeless has a lower risk of failure but field repair is harder (you can put a tube in a tubeless).


1

This is a very common dilemma. You should ride as much as you can on your current bike. Wear that thing out. Your legs and lungs will get stronger every ride because it's probably heavy and not quite perfect. Starting out is incredibly tough, but if you can keep your dedication up by riding once a week for a year THEN you should upgrade to a better bike. ...


1

Klunker as a term is synonymous with early mountain bike (as it is currently known). Klunkers were developed by customising early beach cruisers on 26" wheels (Schwinn predominantly) by spreading the rear dropouts to make them multi-geared and adding moto handle bars and brakes due to their durability and strength (brands such as Magura were initially moto ...


1

With disk brakes the disk rotor is attached to the hub and not to the rim so a wobble in the tyre is unlikely to be the cause of the noise. What I'd be looking at is the following: Are the rotor bolts tight? Is the rotor warped? Are the brake pads worn? Is one or both of the pistons sticking? Is the calipar aligned properly? 1 and 2 you can check ...


1

I'm a total Full-Suss addict, from my first URT (unified rear triangle) and single pivot bikes right up to my current 2014 Trek EX8 Evo 4-bar with fox CTD. Why is no one debating whether gas suspension forks are a "nice to have" anymore? It sounds ridiculous now, but there were those who believed non-sus forks were the way to go for all of the same reasons. ...



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