Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

30

I agree with the comments that 9 miles is a not a short ride for somebody not in shape, but you’ll get in shape for it really fast, so you should go for it. Just get ready to be sore in funny places for a couple weeks. You can make your situation better by doing a few things: Buy a road bike instead, assuming you’ll be on pavement. At the very least, ...


11

I've cycled 15km (or 9.3 miles) to work for over 2 years. You'll get used to it very fast. I can reiterate what @tim.farkas is saying about that wearing a backpack will get old fast. I've bolted a big plastik box onto my bike rack to put my backpack in. It was very relieving to cycle without anything on your back. Take your time in the beginning and cycle ...


7

Biking is an easy activity to throttle. Start slow and take breaks along the way if necessary. Also take days off when you feel fatigued or sore. Make sure you hydrate.


7

Chain will rust always after washing (or even light rain or a puddle of water), if not re-lubed. I think this is detrimental to the chain, as it removes material from the rollers and thus contributes to chain stretch. Bolts for stem, handlebars etc. seem to always like to rust after rain or washing. I don't think it is a big deal, but it ruins the look of ...


6

Don't pressure hose your bike at all and steer clear of the air compressor. You don't want to force water, air or grit into seals and bearings. I always lightly hose off excess dirt or brush it off, then sponge down with a soapy hot water, then rinse, leave or drip -dry or use a cloth to wipe off excess liquid. Clean the chain, rings, cassette, rims with ...


6

I basically agree with @RoboKaren's answer, but wanted to add a couple of things that would take up too much space for a comment. For starters, you say that the chain mashed up the derailleur. So the derailleur was actually the "victim" of the problem, not necessarily the cause. So while you might need to replace the derailleur, that is likely not the only ...


6

If your bicycle is a BSO (bicycle shaped object sold at discount mass retailers), then likely no. You'd spend $100+ labor on the derailleur and a new chain, but then the next week the brakes would fail, the handlebar would come off, or the frame would crack. BSOs are money pits. Furthermore, it's unlikely you could just replace the derailleur, you'd have to ...


5

I'd look at which situations you are encountering tire slips in. If you are encountering tire slips in cornering, studs are probably the way to go (or much more conservative riding). If you are having trouble while you are braking, you may consider adjusting your technique to be much more rear brake heavy or rear brake alone. I find that no matter what I ...


5

I read Chris Cleeland's answer and was appalled that his was the accepted answer. Let me first state that I used to be a bike mechanic, and I ride through inclement weather year round. As another already stated, WD40 is useful for cleaning, but you should never use it on your drive-train (chain, freewheel, front cogs). You wrote that you are concerned ...


4

You may be overwashing it. Rust needs water to oxidize steel and you're providing it in copious amounts. That combined with either the sulphur in the air or salt (if you're near an ocean) is a deadly mix. You may want to give your exposed bolts a nice coating of something that will prevent rust. WD-40 is fine for that purpose but washes off easily. Some ...


4

Consider an electric bike. My situation was similar, 15km is just about 9 miles and while I'm not a "big fat slob" I'm not super-fit either. I could do it on a moderate quality touring bike in 45 minutes but I got to work soaked in sweat. Taking a (dare I mention it) cigarette-pause around kilometer 10, and cycling gently, I took 55 minutes but didn't offend ...


3

Since a hybrid is a combination of two or more types of bike characteristics, there are many posibilities, and you should consider what aspects of the particular bike where meant for the mountain or for the road and see if they meet you needs. Tires You can use almost any tire, provided your frame has the clearance needed. Wider tires can be safely used at ...


2

Without digging too deep into the physics of damped motion now, I say "there isn't an optimal damping setting for all riders and terrains". Let's consider first the critical damping case as defined in the wikipedia article. This is based on the case that you "excite" your system (i.e. set it into motion) once and then leave it alone until it has calmed down ...


2

The great thing about bikes is that almost anything is possible for the home mechanic. But only you can answer the question of whether it's worth it. Deraillers almost never "wear out", at most they need new jockey wheels. They can get damaged or bent, often is is the hanger that is bent not the derailluer. So likely all you need is a new shifter, ...


2

If you are getting that much rust then you are putting that bike up wet. It does not take much water - it is only dry if it is bone dry. If you are hosing that bike down after every ride you are putting too much water on that bike. Unprotected rust will consume iron and steel. Wiki Rust I would suggest you go with two levels of cleaning Touch up - keep ...


2

I been making 5 miles from home to work for a year and this are a few advices by myself. Try to make a first ride of recognition when you don't have to worry about time, maybe the weekend. In this ride you have to pay attention to bumps, holes, car's crosses and transit signals in the road and if there is places for fix your bike in case of something ...


2

Frames very similar to current hybrids have often been sold as mountain bikes for fairly benign riding. With a suspension fork you essentially have a hardtail. Mountain tyres tend to have much more tread which is a bit of a chore on tarmac. For many forest trail rides you could just get on a stock hybrid and ride in the dry at least. Anything much more ...


2

You actually guessed the only thing that you really need to watch out for: the BB shell width. And you don't even necessarily need that until you're actually putting it all together. Almost all BB shells are 68 or 73 mm. Most of the external BB's come built for a 73 mm shell and include a spacer for a 68 mm shell. The odds are really really good that the ...


2

Note that spindle length is independant of the frame, and depends only on the crankset. This makes the shimano external bearing system is easy to install since the cups work with any standard BB shell width, and the spindle is integral to the right crank of the crankset (i.e. no worries about 113/117.5/123mm etc... spindles as you would have to consider for ...


1

These are just old U-Brakes (installed at the chain stays as was cool for part of the late 80s). You just need to unbolt them from the studs (maybe hit it with some penetrating oil to help loosen it oFF the studs). Unfortunately due to the placement of the U brake , you're going to need to get another u brake since you won't be able to mount a normal brake ...


1

The key difference between a hybrid and mountain bike is the geometry and the position of the rider. Hybrid bikes tend to have a steeper headtube (headangle) which gives the rider a more upright position. The disadvantages for climbing will be the riders weight would be too far back and the bike would feel as if the front wheel is lifting. Descending the ...


1

The real issue with ice is that it has a very low coefficient of friction, and weight distribution won't change that enough to make a difference. Tires with a soft compound and a lot of siping help somewhat, but the best solution is a tire with metal studs.


1

First of all I'd like to congratulate you, you've already done perhaps the hardest part, deciding to cycle to work. Its going to be tough, but I'm sure you can manage, and its well worth it. I'm going to go through some concerns that others haven't brought up. You will want to get the fastest bike you can get. You want a road bike or a cyclocross bike. ...


1

Consider using something like isopropyl alcohol to wipe down things that need to be clean but not moist/damp. You can use that on brake components with no residue and with no harm to surrounding paint. There are certainly volatile organic compounds that would also leave no residue (such as automotive brake cleaner) but those are typically not really good ...


1

Muc-Off or any other bike specific cleaning product is a good bet. Followed by a brush and hose down. It's not necessary to go all out with a pressure hose. I also use a chain degreaser spray and use this sparingly on the cassette with a brush. It bring the chain up like new. However, immediately after cleaning the drive-train - I re-oil the chain and wipe ...


1

If cornering is the primary issue I will offer the following advice: look thru the turn to where you to be when you exit use your brakes BEFORE you turn; enter the turn at the speed you want to hit the apex and accelerate out keep mass over the center of the bike; don't lean into the turn practice turning on dirt until you slide or fall; cyclocross skills ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible