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9

Step 1: Get used to bailing out. Put your bike in first gear. Ride very slowly, then give a (small but sharp) upwards jerk on the bars as you do a hard downstroke on one of the pedals. Stay seated. You should have the power to pass the "tipping point". When you do, put your feet down so you don't fall on your butt. Do this until it feels completely ...


7

I'd suggest using a bike box (there are reusable ones sold and cardboard ones similar to the type of cardboard box that a new bike comes in). A bike shop should be willing to part with a box that a bike they're selling came in (and maybe pack it themselves) for some small fee. This video shows how to pack a bike in a cardboard bike box: ...


6

Just keep on doing what you're doing. To get good at anything, the easiest way is to keep doing that thing. As an aside, I find I descend a lot quicker when I'm wearing a cap with the peak down. I think that having the peak in my field of view forces me to keep my head up.


6

It think it's a Swiss bike. The top tube says Velo Sport Walpen Fiesch. Walpen is a Swiss surname from Valais in Switzerland. Fiesch is a municipality in Valais in Switzerland. There is/was a Swiss bike company called Moor, which on older bikes carry this head badge: I found an old German eBay listing in the Google web cache for this bike in Berlin,...


4

Put the spacers back in and see how it feels. If it feels better and your gears a shifting well enough for you, leave them in. As @Daniel says, chainline is not as important as some believe. In a perfect world, you get the chain line right and never, never, ever, cross the chain. But just like the movie, sometimes you just have to cross the chain, and hell ...


4

Assuming this is your bike, the answer would be no. You could technically add disk brakes on the front, but it would require changing the forks to ones that had attachment points for disk brakes. You would also have to change the wheels/hubs to ones that are compatible for mounting the disk. There is no good method of adding disk brakes to the rear as this ...


3

The slightly sarcastic-sounding comment is correct, unfortunately. Even if you used a high-end xray imaging system to carefully analyse the frame, the best you could say is "there are no obvious defects found". You might find major defects, in which case you'd probably recycle the frame rather than riding it, but if you don't you haven't really learned a ...


3

Ensure the shifter is set to the low position - the position where the chain is on the smallest chain ring. Give the cable a tug, it should be taut but not tight. You can make minor tension adjustments by turning the barrel adjuster near the front shifter-to-cable housing connection. If you can not take up enough slack with the barrel adjuster, screw it in ...


3

It depends a lot on the fine print of the bike, and how good you are at guessing where forces will go. Broadly, if you make a solid structure and mount it properly the bike will usually be fine, but most parts of a bike are not designed for forces in new directions. Generally muffler tube is 1.6mm or more and mild steel, where even cheap bikes are 0.9mm or ...


3

Windscreens are more about rider comfort than decreasing air resistance. I would think particularly with the upright riding position of a mountain bike that your hypothetical installation of a windscreen would increase air resistance, unfortunately, by expanding the area of mass that would push against the air. The common advice for getting more aerodynamic ...


3

Practice, practice, practice. Start moving forward slowly in a low gear and then pop the front wheel off the ground by suddenly pushing a pedal forward and pulling up on the handlebars at the same time, and just keep pedaling while trying to balance on one wheel. If you accelerate to a point where you cannot pedal fast enough to maintain balance on one ...


2

pump your suspension, the lean back while pedaling to get the pop, keep the consistent pedal to keep the wheelie going ( you might feel uncomfortable leaning that far back) feather your break while doing it. i like doing wheelies on gear 3-1 it seems to be the best gear for it. remember practise makes perfect, you probably wont get it first go. good luck!


2

I'm not a 100% sure however I think the 'spring' in those forks was actually elastomers. The linked Suntour fork appears to have the correct steerer type (threaded) and the steerer is long enough. A big problem though is the axle to crown length of the fork as it is 100m travel. It is likely that the Suntour fork that you linked to will be significantly ...


2

Further to the above comments: Your bike size sounds about right - see here: Evans size guide Stand over height is that you can stand over the top tube with your feet flat on the floor and raise the front wheel off the ground. When seated on the saddle you should be able to touch the ground with toes and possibly ball of your foot on one side at least. Look ...


2

It may last for years and years as we are talking of an alloy frame, but it is not unbreakable. I have a friend of mine who broke a Trek Alloy XC hardtail frame and Trek replaced it with its latest model. Still, neither the front derailleur nor the headset were compatible, so he had to invest in both to get the bicycle back to work. According to Specialized ...


2

As @Batman has suggested brake fluid is hygroscopic. Over time moisture from the air is absorbed by the fluid. When the brakes get hot enough the absorbed water will boil. This results in air bubbles forming in the fluid. While brake fluid is not compressible the air bubbles are. This results in a mushy or spongy feeling to the brakes. Once cooled the ...


2

Some suggestions: Follow someone else who better than you. Try to keep up - you'll be looking at where they are, ahead of you helps you anticipate whats coming up. Ride the same track in the dark, and its a whole new experience. Your light only throws so far - even the best ones only reliably show up 20 metres ahead and that tends to be a spot not a ...


1

This happens everytime one replaces a component of the drivetrain since the original cable position is rarely restored. He needs to do something called indexing the gears. It is a common procedure and there are many good tutorials online explaining how to do it much better than I could. Here is one I'd trust-


1

In short yes. I had a Judy on a 1997 Trek Y Five-o many years back. 80mm version if I remember correct. That frame and fork used a 1 1/8 headset steerer which I assume your frame will also have. Just make sure the steerer tube on the fork is compatible and aim for form travel between 80-100mm Specs on the bike I had are here: http://www.bikepedia.com/...


1

You cannot stick weld ("arc weld") on a bicycle frame unless it is some custom build bike with thick tubes. You would have to be so extremely good with a stick to not blow through the tubing. And you would have to use some special rods that have a lower melting point. If you are going to weld on the frame you need to either use a MIG or TIG (preferably TIG). ...


1

You should use the tyres that fit the rims on your bike. If you were a professional you'd use whatever your sponsor told you to, so that's a bit of a side issue. Tubulars are back in the MTB world, but they're still rare and it's unlikely your bike has them. I suggest not buying a tubular wheelset, let your sponsors do that when they decide it's a good idea....


1

Steve Gurney invented a pod bike and used it for the Coast to Coast race. It's possibly a bit extreme for what you want. :-)



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