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8

The differences are quite significant from race to race - each track is different. Also events such as Rampage are not too much about speed. The top speed may vary between 55-65km/h on tracks such as Mount Sainte Anne up to around 80km/h in Pietermaritzburg which is known for high speeds achieved. Of course all assuming good weather. Also these speeds are ...


5

There is usually a minimum insertion marker on the seat post to indicate the minimum amount of the seat post which should remain in the seat tube. The frame manufacturer might also specify a minimum insertion depth for the frame. It is not recommended to run the seat post inserted any less than the greater of these two this as it can put the frame under ...


5

From my experience, no they would not. Have you ever watched anyone ride a fatbike? Their front tire wobbles all over the place, the extra weight from the heavy tires makes fine-adjustments much more difficult, putting extra fatigue on your body. That being said, training with a bike that's not suited for skinnys will make riding them easier when you hop on ...


5

Presuming it came out of the bike, probably oil from Hydraulic brakes. Although the link does not specify things in detail - A 2009 bike with Tora Rock shox and Deore components would almost certainly have had hydraulic brakes. Check the brakes are working and not spongy. If in any doubt take it to the LBS for a check over - a leak from the shocks needs ...


4

Honestly hopping curbs isn't something that I would consider as an important factor to consider in choosing a bike for commuting. Riding a road bike it's almost always faster to just stick to the road, and if you do way to exit the roadway it's rare that you will have to travel more than a few seconds before there's a driveway. Still, YMMV - I don't know ...


3

I think you would find the bike handles reasonably on single track, 4x4 tracks and dirt paths but there are a few things to bear in mind. I'd ride single track but stick to trails graded easy. Where an MTB would be mandatory would be anything above that. The following features would require a MTB (or at least no gear or being on a short ride ie. mud). ...


3

With a mountain bike parts do wear out. I would be more cautious of a 10 year old bike with original parts unless it had original tires and I could still see the manufacturer 'tags' (i.e. like new) showing it had been ridden only once or twice and been a garage ornament for all but the first 2 weeks of its life. If the bike has been ridden regularly you ...


2

Almost certainly oil from your shocks or brakes. Neither are designed to be upside down. Another possibility is that in rare cases if the drain holes in your bottom bracket or chainstays are plugged up, you can get moisture accumulation in your frame. That can mix with oil and dirt from your BB and headset and drain out of other areas when the bike is ...


2

Two questions here - restore an old bike and what bike for your wife. Lets deal with the easy one - an old Specialised will be a better bike than a department store one. If you need much more gear to be replaced, consider looking for a donor. Add another $100 to you list for things that might need doing - like new cluster and chain rings, brake pads etc. ...


2

Road bike will bang / jump - what ever you want to call it MartynRoadBikes2 Frames and wheels are just as strong Road Bike Party 2 - The Making Of Martyn Ashton's Colnago C59 Disc On tires you lose the flotation and traction of a bigger tire. And a smaller tires is more susceptible to pinch flats. You have to be careful with a 25mm tire but as you can ...


2

Since I don't ride a MTB my answer is just about road bike capabilities. What you can do on your road bike comes down to two main things the size of it's tires your skills These factors do interact: with greater skills you can do more on any given equipment. Tires come in a range of sizes (as I'm sure you are aware). For the kind of riding you propose ...


2

To expand on Batman's answer, here is a good picture of an ispec-ready shifter attach to the brake lever's clamp. Here is a traditional shifter using its own clamp (SL-M591) taken from my potato camera


2

There are also a few rules of the thumb to know how much of the seatpost to leave in the frame. If the limit line is not visible on the seatpost, te safe way is to keep 1/3 of its length in the frame. Although it's more than enough for most models (it's around 10-15cm depending on the length of your seatpost), some more expensive ones tend to have thinner ...


2

Mountain bikes in general are going to have a more seat post out compared to a road bike as that is the frame design. Mountain bike have a sloped top tube and road bike flat or slightly sloped. If you are using the bicycle as designed then it should not be a problem. Don't buy a small frame if you are 6 foot and put a monster seat post on it. Mountain ...


2

Aluminum fatigues. A 10 year of bike with a lot of miles could be getting towards the end of it life. It has a modern headset. Full suspension has come a long way in 10 years. But 26" wheels. I would rather have a hard tail 29". You would have to judge the parts based on inspection. With a leaky fork I would not do it period. How do you know ...


2

I like fixed as the front end is lighter and it does not move around. Carbon if you are willing to spend the money. Single speed means no derailleur to break. And smaller chain ring and bash guard gives you more clearance. I don't think you want a real wide tire. I would think like a 2.1 - preferably tubeless. If you start riding 2" pipe you may even ...


2

Are there ever! I'm totally evangelizing for the adventure cycling association in my answer here, but check this out: Adventure Cycling Route Network. They have a lot of road tours but they do mountain tours as well. You want the extreme of extreme backcountry mountain bike tours? How does 4418km of trail riding along the continental divide sound? Check ...


1

The Novara Safari is a bike designed for off road touring. Novara Safari Bike With a load you are not going to be doing real technical stuff. But you should be a be able to handle "improved trails". The biggest tires it will take is the best thing you can do - and practice. The link says it has Alex ATD 470 rims. Those are not high end rims and more of a ...


1

Like all good answers: yes and no. Having ridden several "fatties," I can say that the wider contact patch and added grip certainly makes for a more confident feeling, but the lower air pressure and subsequent squishy-ness can sometimes make steering a touch...different. There's also the question of how skinny are the skinnies you want to ride? A fat tire ...


1

I have a Yeti ASX dual suspense mountain bike. I fitted the Oldman mountain Sherpa rear rack and carry about 15-20 kgs on it without any problems. I use Ortleib Classic roller panniers and have never had a problem. I've completed the following tours: 600 kms Munda Biddi Mtn bike route in West Australia, Adelaide to Alice Springs 1600 kms, New Zealand South ...



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