Hot answers tagged

6

Short answer yes, a hard tail 29 would be a good fit for what you have described. And it sounds like you already have a fun FS bike and a road bike so it only makes sense. The equation N + 1 comes to mind, where N is the number of bikes you currently own. 29ers roll like nobody's business, they don't accelerate like a smaller tire but the roll over is ...


5

First of all, why do you want a mountain bike?: The nearby nature includes mostly 4X4 paths, sometime narrower but in general in such a paved manner. This is definitely not what a mountain bike is for: They are intended for serious trail use, i.e. broken paths with lots of obstacles/debris. Given what you're describing and your beginning riding ...


4

For XC and trail use it'll be fine. It's really only downhill bikes that require especially strong stems, I think (and in that case you'd likely be using a shorter stem anyway for handling reasons).


4

So you broke the 24T cog in the middle of the cassette? If that is the case i don't think it will be repairable. You may check with Sram Warranty though dependent on circumstance. I have had good luck with their warranty program in the past. My reasoning for saying that it is not repairable is that on the XX1 cassettes, the cluster is machined from one ...


3

Your center of gravity doesn't change just because you let go of the bars. Usually when I am pedaling on a flat or a climb, I am also pulling up on the handlebars to get some extra downforce. I keep my butt in the saddle regardless.


3

The good folks at Bike Radar have already covered this in pretty good detail in a two part article: Part 1 and Part 2 There's also a chunky thread on the Pinkbike forums that has pictures and descriptions of loads of different setups: Pinkbike - Basic Full Suspension Types / Reference With Pictures In regards to price, it is not the suspension setup making ...


2

I would say that the position of the shock doesn't really matter. What matter is : The path of the wheel axis The shock dynamic (How the shock is compressed regarding the position of wheel) 1) The path of the wheel axis If the path is circular then the braking force will bend the suspension. If the center of this circle is lower than the front of ...


2

As for crashworthiness: Materials which yield before failure absorb more energy. Cars pass major crash tests because they are made of cold rolled steel. That property reduces the G load on the victims like nothing else. The material property most closely related to energy absorption ability is called elongation. Elongation is what happens before the ...


2

Google around and fine your local bike co-operative. They'd love for you to donate such a useful thing, plus you get the warm fuzzies for being on topic for this stack.


2

I ran into this issue on my bike recently. It could be a bent axle, damage on the inside of the hub, or both. If the axle is true, you will need to replace the hub or a whole new wheel. Good news, a new MTB wheel is relatively cheap, on the order of about $50-60.


2

I'm 40, and have back and joint issues that make getting up in the morning hard work. If I get-up-and-go its terrible for the first half-hour. So here's what helps me: Full flexion of joints. That means pushing your limbs to the ir comfortable maximum extensions then holding for a few seconds, then a little further. Nothing rough. A hot shower - where ...


2

Yes, the arms should support some of a rider's weight. However, outside of a hard effort, the hands should be light on the bars and the arms should be relaxed. I'm reminded of a brief quote from Wheelmen, "[Eddie] Borysewicz adjusted the [American] riders' bikes, taught them proper positioning, and described how to use their abdominal muscles to keep ...


2

Say you can keep a 30 kph pace on a flat straightaway. On a hill, that can drop to 10 kph or even less depending on the grade you have to climb. Call it 1/3 of your flat pace. Say that half your run is uphill and the other half downhill, and let's also say that the total run is 30 km. If you run on the flat at your regular pace, it takes one hour to do that ...


1

Perhaps. However, that model name was produced in years: 1994-1996 (steel frames) 1999-2000 (aluminium frames) 2003-2004 (aluminium frames) according to: http://bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeSpecs.aspx?year=1995&brand=Fuji&model=Suncrest So if you compare the components to the specifications for each year, you might find a match.... this ...


1

Climbing up the mountain you are doing extra work relative to the flat route. At the top you will have accumulated potential energy. In order to break even with the flat route you will have to convert all that potential energy into motion, without any loss. This is not possible in the current universe due to the third law of thermodynamics. On the ...


1

Con: Because there is only one side on the fork, it limits you to using disc brakes only, since there is no place to mount any type of rim brake solution.


1

RaceFace makes cinch spindles in various lengths. I assume you have a version for 68/73mm bottom brackets. There's also a 100mm bottom bracket spindle option. It will certainly fit, but Q-factor might become too wide for your liking. Theoretically, you can also order a custom length spindle and spacers from some CNC manufacturer.


1

This bike looks like my 1998 Specialized Stumpjumper based on color, setup and my guess that the logo behind your left leg is a Specialized S. That's the best I can given the blurry photo and the mud on the frame.


1

It depends on your bar diameter. Oversize bar is 31.8mm for both road and mountain bars, so the stems are interchangeable. For historical reasons[1], most of "standard" drop bars and stems for those are 26.0mm and other bars are 25.4mm. It is possible to tighten 26.0mm stem to hold 25.4mm bar, but it will put extra tension on both stem and bar. Mountain ...


1

The problem you are encountering is likely because the pressure during the bleed process forces the pistons out slightly - this means that in effect you overfill the system. You are best to push the pistons back fully with the old pads in place, then remove the old pads and replace with a bleed block. You can buy specially designed bleed blocks, or you can ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible