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7

I can see 3 possible causes for the bike being more exausting than it "should" be: 1: Lack of (or incorrect) previous maintenance. Particularly you mention you bought it from a "clueless" person. It is likely that such person didn't knew when to take the bike to maintenance and was not very careful on how or where to keep it while not in use. Some bikes ...


4

Well, the main advantages of tubeless is that you can run lower pressures (which comes with better shock absorption and thus control) with less risk of flats (though you should always carry a backup tube). I'm not entirely sure on where the truth is in regards to weight, but I don't think its important. The disadvantages are still having to carry a backup ...


3

If You are DH racing, then we are talking about racetracks and trails thar are known to the rider, assuming that the rider is practicing and getting used to the track, picking best lines for each section and generally speaking, creating/refining a race strategy. In that context, a gear is to be selected acording to the particular needs of each section, ...


2

I think this is quite a broad question, so I'll highlight a few parts of the bike: Seatposts/saddles: Probably interchangable Forks: You wouldn't want to swap them, and chances are a beefy mountain fork wouldn't go into a road frame anyway, even if you could get the right headset. Gearing: Road bikes typically have higher gearing than mountain bikes ...


2

Rear wheels have never had 9mm axles, they have always been 10mm. For all but "downhill" MTB[2] and fatbikes[3], they are either 135mm 10mm or the new 12mm 142mm maxle standard. http://www.pinkbike.com/news/12x142-explained.html Unless it specifically states otherwise I would assume that the rear wheel of an MTB wheelset is a 135mm 10mm axle. Anything ...


2

A general procedure with too tight clamps: Put in the screw or a longer one of the same diameter from the opposite side. Fit a piece of (hard, like a small coin) metal into the slot. Tighten the screw carefully. It should open the clamp enough to fit it over the bar


1

Main diference is tooth count, and that imposes differences in deraileur dimensions. As other answer mentions, gear range is wider in a MTB, so the rear deraileur has to be able to take-up more chain slack. A longer cage solves this. As long as they are designed with the same cable pull ratio, they are compatible, you can esaily fit an MTB deraileur to a ...


1

The main differences to the drive train is the length of the rear derailleur arm. MTBs have lower and wider spaced gearing which means the rear derailleur has to handle a bigger span in chain length. A MTB typically has a large chainring with 42 teeth and a small one with 22 and a rear cassette with 12 - 28 tooth span - so the chain has to fit both a 42+28 ...


1

I will interject that there is a whole discipline/style of riding called "trials" and they have bikes that are tuned/designed for "stunts". They share more in common with BMX style bikes probably than anything else. Really it depends on what your definition of stunts is. Any number of flatland, freestyle, freeride, slopestyle, dirt jump or trials bikes ...


1

This advice - from above- could you get killed: Firstly your tires must be hard - near the maximum pressure written on the side wall. Riding soft tires is a recipe for death under oncoming traffic, because they don't have as much grip and just slide out from under you. It's junk from a self-appointed expert. Sorry: yes, you've cycled 50 years, but you're ...


1

I am experiencing the same problem as the OP and I can confirm that the cause of his problem is NOT the cable but the spring that is inside of the mechanical disc brake itself. If you actually open up the caliper you will find the spring. While my spring is not broken or rusted it seems to be coming out of place during operation. There are two ends of the ...



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