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5

It seems to be what some call a BSO: Bike Shaped Object. (This is a derogative term). It indeed mimics a Mountain Bike, a Dual Suspension Mountain Bike, but as you state it is really heavy, it means it is made of steel, and not necessarily good grade steel. From what the picture shows, it also appears to be fitted with low level components, but the headset ...


3

The crash made the chain drop from the currently selected front chainring to a smaller one (i.e if you have 3 rings and you where on the middle, it jumped on the 1st - lefmost- smaller one). The crash didn't change any gear on the shifter though, it just made the chain pop to a smaller ring. Maybe not fully, but partially. Afterwards cranking a couple of ...


3

What you want for road use is slick tires -- tread and knobs are bad for road use. You have 26" (ISO 559) rims, so you need 26 x (something) tires where (something) is a number in decimal form (e.g. 1.75). Going for smaller tires will lower the bike a bit, and smaller tires have to be run at higher pressure (so you'll get less cushioning). There will also ...


3

Adding rear suspension to an existing bike not designed for rear suspension is hard - you'd have to cut the tubes, weld them and make sure the result is safe. Adding front suspension to a bike is not so hard, but it will change the geometry. You need to find the specs of the fork and headset that are in the bike already, and then find something compatible ...


3

That depends on the tyre, the range of pressures is printed on the sidewall of your tyres. It's your choice what pressure you want - lower pressure is generally more grippy and less bumpy on rough roads, high pressure saves energy. If the road is smooth, go for the upper limit of what is printed on your tyre.


3

What's the wheel size? If it's 700c, then you can get disc road/CX/gravel frame. Do mind type of bottom bracket, hub widths and seatpost diameter, though. You can fit MTB shifters and brake levers to a drop bar, but that would look funky, so probably flat bar only. For proper fit, stem might require replacement too.


2

Its almost always more cost effective to sell the existing bike and use the funds to buy a (used) bike you want. Its worth doing it from the perspective of learning about bikes, owning a unique piece of art/engineering "franken bike" or just a cool way to kill some spare time. Doing it because you want a road bike and only have a MTB is the wrong reason. ...


2

I think there are several issues with your approach for improving power on bike: doing the same workout stresses the same aerobic pathway, since there are several ways your body can burn fuel it is worth exercising all of them. This means doing intervals of different length with different rest periods. Example: 3x(12+6) min on and off. The on part is ...


2

Apart from these being very different frames with very different uses you won't have much luck transferring parts. In terms of your bike there is very little that would fit: Wheels - won't fit - the demo 8 has a 650b wheel (27.5") the sirrus has a 700c wheel (29") and a thru axle vs quick release hub. (incidentally both are 135mm rear hubs though) Fork/ ...


2

The Park Tool CWP-7 is the tool for this job. Remove the outer cap using an allen key and then install the CWP-7. There is no need to tighten it ultra hard. Then use an allen key on the CWP-7 and start tightening the bolt. The extractor will "penetrate" the crank and the crank arm will start detaching itself from the other crank arm which also has the ...


2

There are currently 4 MTB freehub/cassette standards for SRAM/Shimano drive trains: 7 speed - Shimano/SRAM - based on Shimano HG 8/9/10 speed - Shimano/SRAM (a 7 speed cassette with a 4.5mm spacer also fits) based on Shimano HG Shimano 11 speed - fits an 8/9/10 freehub (MTB only) - based on Shimano HG SRAM 11 speed - XD driver freehub - SRAM proprietary ...


2

At 1.5k it has to be a hardtail. Rear suspensions need to be done right to be worth having in the first place. If I was a long-travel guy (I'm not) I would start looking at FS bikes once my budget passed 2k. As to the frame, 1.5k would get you a cheap/heavy carbon frame or a top quality aluminum frame. I'd go aluminum. The above assumes that you are buying ...


2

One possibility is that the hub's freewheel mechanism has broken. Maybe it's fixable with some spare parts or you may need a new freewheel hub body or a new hub altogether. Your LBS will be able to assess the situation. It looks like this: https://www.google.gr/search?q=mtb+freewheel+hub+body&tbm=isch


2

The nice people at specialized.com have a archive section with pictures of all the models produced since 2008. Go to the web site and scroll down to the bottom of the page. There's a Support section with Bike Archive as the last item. Answer shamelessly stolen from here.


1

Well, it depends… Would you be happier cleaning a bunch of stuff out and getting a shiny new bike that reflects all you've learned? One that will "just work," or Would it be a fun project to build up a bike from scratch? Would it feel good to know that you'd "built it yourself?" Do you have the time for the project? Is it ok with you to get stuck and make ...


1

It is possible. For typical mountain rims, the low limit is somewhere around 28mm. Some differences from mounting narrower tires are following: Less cushioning from tires: Smaller tires can not absorb as much shock from from curbs, cracks in the pavement, etc. On the other hand, smaller tires can be made with more flexible casing and absorb small ...


1

Really hard to say without knowing what hub you're running. Most likely the pawls failed inside the cassette body. The pawls and springs are the mechanism which allow cassette to spin freely independent of the wheel (like when you coast or spin the cranks backward). When forward pressure is applied to the cassette the pawls and springs engage and thus move ...


1

An easy answer directly from Schwalbe website: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/profil.html "Many MTB tires are marked with a “FRONT” and a “REAR” arrow. The “FRONT” arrow indicates the recommended rolling direction for the front wheel and respectively the “REAR” arrow is the direction for the rear wheel."


1

The "front pedal crank gears" are called chainrings. Just searching for the word should find several options. There are several different bolt circle diameters for 5-bolt mountain bike chainrings. It's best to measure. Aftermarket parts from brands other than Shimano are fine, look for chainrings designed for 8 speeds or less and correct bolt circle ...


1

I have read about damaged lockout systems from big hits while locked, so my advise is treat a locked fork as a fragile fork unless you want an expensive repair bill. Probably the key point is what is "a hard hit" and "high load" for a fork? That said, I have taken a couple of what I would call big hits with my fork locked with no damage, but I weigh under ...



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