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8

Gravel tires are normally a little knobby: versus completely smooth for a road tire. One strategy is to run a gravel or combination tire in the front and a road tire in the back. A combination tire is one which is nearly slick in the middle with knobs on the sides, so you might want to try one road tire on the back and one gravel tire on the front. ...


4

(As requested, turned comment into answer.) - This question pops up quite often. Most often the riders cadence is too low. Presuming 26" wheels with 2" tires, 42/11 at a cadence of 80 is 38km/h, at 100 its 47km/h. What speeds are you riding at? If you are maintaining these speeds on a solo commute on a MTB, you should get in touch with your national ...


4

Yes, but with some caveats: Road rings are big. You might have clearance issues with the chainstays. Bottom bracket. You might need a new bottom bracket to fit the spindle or change the spacing. New chain. Bigger rings require more chain (usually). Front derailleur. Derailleurs are meant to handle certain sizes, spacings, and mountings, your current one ...


3

Lets get the social aspects out the way - you can lead a horse to water and all that stuff.....: Hows your relationship - will he listen to you and is he prepared to take clearly well intended advice. Also does he believe he has a problem and does he want to fix it. If any of these answers is no there little you can do except ruin you friendship. Till hes ...


3

Look for city or touring tires. Road in bicycle means more of a racing tire. A tire like this go pavement and packed nicely Travel CONTACT. Almost all manufacturers will have tires like this. A road type tread in the middle but a little grip on the edges for if you do sink a little. Great answer from Batman (+1) but I don't think the Gravel Plus is ...


3

You've basically got three sets of bearings on your bike: hubs, bottom bracket, and headset. It's pretty easy to check if the grease has been blown out of any of them by listening to them spin or by checking for play in the part. If anything sound gravelly when you spin it the bearing definitely needs some love. The wiggle check is a little more ...


3

(this is more of a supplemental answer to Pete's one) The answer is somewhat different if you already have back pain vs if you don't. Simply, if you already have pain it's much easier to make it worse, but if you don't an upright bike is fairly unlikely to cause it. The main factor is likely to be how far forward you lean while stilling on the bike, with a ...


3

The number of comments to your question is becoming quite large, so I thought I'd roll my comments up into an answer (of sorts). You ask whether the seat postures could cause back pains, and whilst I have no specialist knowledge in this area, I'd have to say from a purely empirical viewpoint that the answer must be "no". A lot of people ride a lot of miles ...


2

Like many comments, it sounds like it's at least partially related to a change in tire pressure. There's also the external change in tire tread that could contribute to the sound change. If you listen to a large knob tire on a road versus a small knob one, they sound totally different. Your tread might be starting to wear, thus giving a different sound. The ...


2

The protective layer is known as "rim tape". The old tube shouldn't remain within the tire - the only thing inside the rim should be the rim tape and the new tube. You may have different tire pressures than before - have you tried playing with them?


2

As @Daniel said in his comment, use time as he bases for any comparison. I have had MTB rides where I have averaged under 8km/hour, and others where I average over 20km/h over a similar time frame. What does not change is how much effort I put in over that time, but the consistency of that effort does. What I find difficult transitioning from MTB to Road ...


2

Often while mountain biking a twig or rock will get stuck between the swing arms on your front derailleur. This effectively locks the derailleur in place until the rock/twig works itself out. If it happens again, stop and examine the derailleur. Generally you can't see the obstruction while you're riding.


2

You have 26" tyres currently, there are certainly "slicker" options available to you. I think its quite easy to obtain tyres which go down to about 1.25" wide. This is not the crazy narrow 23mm (or less) that you might typically see on a road bike (and really, these bikes can only be ridden on the road), but on tarmac/asphalt you'll certainly notice a ...


1

I have done quite a bit of touring on my Surly Long Haul Trucker which includes 1,000 + kilometres of dirt riding 1. On my Surly for such tours I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Mondial HS 428 47-622 tyres and prior to that for an early tour again with a fair bit of dirt roads I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Cross HS 334 700Cx38. Both tyres have proven to be more than ...


1

I presume you mean the rear derailleur jumps to a higher (harder to pedal) gear when you stand up to pedal hard, right? This is a common rear derailleur problem, happens only under high chain tensions, and more likely with inexpensive or worn rear derailleurs. It shouldn't do that, as it can be dangerous to the rider. So you need to get it fixed. ...


1

Sorry for an answer that should be a comment (need to get my bicycles.SE rep up before it'll let me do it right). I see (open the asker's image to view larger)... A Marzocchi Bomber fork, construction and decals look like a late-90s Bomber Z1 (http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=198026, though slightly different from the pictured "bam" model). ...


1

I happen to own two almost identical mountain bikes other than frame. One aluminum (Orbea) with Niner carbon font fork. And the other an all carbon Niner with Niner carbon front fork. I was looking for a Niner carbon frame and found a whole bike at such a deal I bought it. Both are single speed and tubeless. The all carbon has 2.1 tires compared 2.25 on ...


1

I prefer the feel of tubeless tires. Using the same tire, there is less rolling resistance by removing the tube.



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