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4

First of all, why do you want a mountain bike?: The nearby nature includes mostly 4X4 paths, sometime narrower but in general in such a paved manner. This is definitely not what a mountain bike is for: They are intended for serious trail use, i.e. broken paths with lots of obstacles/debris. Given what you're describing and your beginning riding ...


2

I'm 40, and have back and joint issues that make getting up in the morning hard work. If I get-up-and-go its terrible for the first half-hour. So here's what helps me: Full flexion of joints. That means pushing your limbs to the ir comfortable maximum extensions then holding for a few seconds, then a little further. Nothing rough. A hot shower - where ...


2

Yes, the arms should support some of a rider's weight. However, outside of a hard effort, the hands should be light on the bars and the arms should be relaxed. I'm reminded of a brief quote from Wheelmen, "[Eddie] Borysewicz adjusted the [American] riders' bikes, taught them proper positioning, and described how to use their abdominal muscles to keep ...


2

Say you can keep a 30 kph pace on a flat straightaway. On a hill, that can drop to 10 kph or even less depending on the grade you have to climb. Call it 1/3 of your flat pace. Say that half your run is uphill and the other half downhill, and let's also say that the total run is 30 km. If you run on the flat at your regular pace, it takes one hour to do that ...


1

Perhaps. However, that model name was produced in years: 1994-1996 (steel frames) 1999-2000 (aluminium frames) 2003-2004 (aluminium frames) according to: http://bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeSpecs.aspx?year=1995&brand=Fuji&model=Suncrest So if you compare the components to the specifications for each year, you might find a match.... this ...


1

Climbing up the mountain you are doing extra work relative to the flat route. At the top you will have accumulated potential energy. In order to break even with the flat route you will have to convert all that potential energy into motion, without any loss. This is not possible in the current universe due to the third law of thermodynamics. On the ...


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Con: Because there is only one side on the fork, it limits you to using disc brakes only, since there is no place to mount any type of rim brake solution.


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RaceFace makes cinch spindles in various lengths. I assume you have a version for 68/73mm bottom brackets. There's also a 100mm bottom bracket spindle option. It will certainly fit, but Q-factor might become too wide for your liking. Theoretically, you can also order a custom length spindle and spacers from some CNC manufacturer.



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