Hot answers tagged

7

I'd suggest using a bike box (there are reusable ones sold and cardboard ones similar to the type of cardboard box that a new bike comes in). A bike shop should be willing to part with a box that a bike they're selling came in (and maybe pack it themselves) for some small fee. This video shows how to pack a bike in a cardboard bike box: ...


4

Assuming this is your bike, the answer would be no. You could technically add disk brakes on the front, but it would require changing the forks to ones that had attachment points for disk brakes. You would also have to change the wheels/hubs to ones that are compatible for mounting the disk. There is no good method of adding disk brakes to the rear as this ...


3

The slightly sarcastic-sounding comment is correct, unfortunately. Even if you used a high-end xray imaging system to carefully analyse the frame, the best you could say is "there are no obvious defects found". You might find major defects, in which case you'd probably recycle the frame rather than riding it, but if you don't you haven't really learned a ...


3

Windscreens are more about rider comfort than decreasing air resistance. I would think particularly with the upright riding position of a mountain bike that your hypothetical installation of a windscreen would increase air resistance, unfortunately, by expanding the area of mass that would push against the air. The common advice for getting more aerodynamic ...


2

It may last for years and years as we are talking of an alloy frame, but it is not unbreakable. I have a friend of mine who broke a Trek Alloy XC hardtail frame and Trek replaced it with its latest model. Still, neither the front derailleur nor the headset were compatible, so he had to invest in both to get the bicycle back to work. According to Specialized ...


2

As @Batman has suggested brake fluid is hygroscopic. Over time moisture from the air is absorbed by the fluid. When the brakes get hot enough the absorbed water will boil. This results in air bubbles forming in the fluid. While brake fluid is not compressible the air bubbles are. This results in a mushy or spongy feeling to the brakes. Once cooled the ...


1

In short yes. I had a Judy on a 1997 Trek Y Five-o many years back. 80mm version if I remember correct. That frame and fork used a 1 1/8 headset steerer which I assume your frame will also have. Just make sure the steerer tube on the fork is compatible and aim for form travel between 80-100mm Specs on the bike I had are here: http://www.bikepedia.com/...


1

Steve Gurney invented a pod bike and used it for the Coast to Coast race. It's possibly a bit extreme for what you want. :-)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible