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2

My friends and I have hiked a lot while carrying our bikes. What I've found that works best is: go to the non drive side of the bike drop the non drive side pedal down left hand on the left fork lower right hand on the non drive side crank arm lift whole bike and place bottom tube behind your neck This works because: bike is central on top of you and ...


1

This is not really a question we can answer for you. Practice lashing the bike to the pack until you get something balanced. You have front wheel up, front wheel down, and sideways. A climbing style pack will have more lash points. Put the weight high so you can lean forward and get the weight over your hips without bending a lot.


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At a glance, comparing the Salsa Fargo and Kona Explosif, the Salsa's bottom bracket is lower than the Konas. The Salsa's BB position is more like a road bike. Thus if I were to hazard a guess, the Kona is purpose designed for severe off roading to clear rocks, logs and all. The Salsa on the other hand doesn't need to worry about such severity and can offer ...


2

Aside from touring specific braze-ons (rackss, fenders, spokes, pump, etc), the short answer is that adventure touring bikes are going to be more well suited as an all around machine where as an MTB has a narrower performance mark. The long answer is frame geometry. Briefly looking at the geometry of some of the bikes you listed shows the Kona having ...


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One possible and modern solution is: none. Go 1x10 or 1x11 with a narrow wide chain ring and a RD with a clutch.


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Right about the time fat bikes were about to become popular, I put a 26x4" front tire (which has the same diameter as a 29x2" tire) on a 26" bike, without changing anything else. The result was similar to a 69er, raising the front hub by about an inch. Besides improving handling on descents (perhaps due in part to the wider tire), it really didn't affect ...


3

I've been riding a 26 back, 27.5 front for about 4 years now. It works great for me. It does significantly change the geometry of the bike, but that is exactly what I wanted. I had a relatively upright XC bike and the change in geometry gave me a slacker headtube and longer wheelbase. This does make the bike less of a capable climber, but it's a much nicer ...


2

This is definitely possible and some years ago, the combination of a 26" rear wheel and a 29" front wheel was somewhat popular (though still far from mainstream) in the MTB scene. These bikes are sometimes referred to as 69ers. Combining a 27.5" rear wheel (and thus 27.5" frame) with a 29" front wheel (and fork), should be relatively easy. As long as the ...


4

Technically it can be done. Different wheel sizes were used over the years, starting from late 1980s in some niche touring bikes, where front wheel was significantly smaller than the rear one. Mountain bikers have used a setup of 26" wheel at the front and 24" at the back, especially for downhill (even at World Cup level) at the beginning of this century, ...


1

You can do this and there are even bikes that are designed to do so, for example this bike here by a company called Liteville. This bike is not only intended to be used with mixed wheel sizes but does also allow to change the wheel sizes used. So why would one want to do so? Without having explicitly searched for reasons, I would guess that one can use the ...


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A technological solution is a Dropper Seat Post. But you should really learn to switch legs to match the turn. You generally want the outside leg down and weighted. http://www.leelikesbikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/P2PIcover.png


3

I believe popular advice for MTB carving is to drop the outside pedal, rather than keeping the pedals horizontal. If you then dump your weight to the outside pedal (off your bars) you can lower your center of gravity some and in the case of pumping that weight dump, increase your traction. While keeping your pedals horizontal for obstacles increases your ...


3

Generally, if you haven't bent the derailleur (or its hanger) [such as by having a crash], you should have been using the barrel adjuster as shown in this image (from here) in order to make tweaks to the adjustments. The mis-adjustment you were experiencing was likely just "cable stretch" in the non-bent case. The barrel adjuster changes the cable ...


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Many fatbike manufacturers are currently making full carbon frames intended to be raced and ridden at sub zero temperatures. These manufacturers were previously using titanium, but most folks ran all the same carbon parts that everyone else did on their regular mountain bikes. Short answer, yes. This has been done for a long time and the breakage rate ...


0

Perhaps. There are two main areas of a bicycle prone to damage in truly cold temperatures. The first is your freehub. When the grease in a freehub gets thicker, it can prevent the hub from full engagement. At best this means when you pedal forward, nothing happens. At worst, you can get partial engagement and chip/destroy the teeth inside your freehub, ...


2

Are there ever! I'm totally evangelizing for the adventure cycling association in my answer here, but check this out: Adventure Cycling Route Network. They have a lot of road tours but they do mountain tours as well. You want the extreme of extreme backcountry mountain bike tours? How does 4418km of trail riding along the continental divide sound? Check ...



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