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0

I recently went riding on the Kokopelli Trail and experienced the pucker factor....i will say that it was better this year than last year...so familiarity with trails helps. I rode them all this year and walked quite a bit last year....but in Fruita i got to the top of Zippity Do Dah and pulled out again this year. I just couldn't look past the drops...but ...


1

I fit in to that weight category and I ride a Trek superfly 100Al dual suspension bike. I do ride it hard and even being the biggest bloke in the group that I ride with, I can out ride most of the lighter blokes. I ride the bike hard and unfortunately I do regularly break things. I have re-spoked the rear wheel with heavy duty spokes after breaking too many ...


4

From Tom J. Stokes excellent article on choosing tires: Wider tires tend to grip better during cornering and over rough terrain, at the expense of increased rolling resistance and weight. Wider tires will also float better in sandy conditions and are much more resistant to pinch flats when riding over sharp rocks or off of drops. For moderately rocky ...


0

assuming your brakes are clean, well maintained, aligned, right and tight; sounds like you need to get the brakes HOT to help them bed in. Find the steepest tarmac deserted road that you know. Going at about 5-10 MPH, do an emergency stop on one brake only. On no account lock the wheels and have overriding regard for staying under control. Do this a few ...


3

You are correct, axle to crown is the key measurement for selecting a replacement fork. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to find this measurement. When searching for this information axle to crown can be listed many different ways on user forums such as axle to crown, axle-to-crown, A2C, A to C, ATC etc. This is a good place to start for bigger brands ...


4

Most 120mm forks have a similar axle to crown height and it's more or less 40mm higher than the axle to crown height of typical 80mm fork. There are of course differences between models, but not really enough to matter. Typically hard tail frames are designed around a range of fork sizes. 120mm would be long for an XC frame that came with an 80mm fork. I ...


7

The answer to your question depends heavily on the infrastructure that is available to you, and the highest level of mechanical ability in your party. As another pointed out, you will want at least two pumps, multi-tools, etc. My wife and I do pretty challenging mtb tours with BOB trailers. We generally bring the following (subject to modification ...


0

I think first of all you should ready to adequate food and water, bring to a common repair tools, of course, a bicycle light is also very necessary, so you can ensure your driving safety at night, and finally you have to prepare a sleeping bag to sleep at night , there is an important point is that not to take things too much, otherwise you will be very hard ...


3

You could consider a self-inflating mat (e.g. thermarest) though when I looked at them they were expensive and heavier than my alternative: A foam mat only needs to reach from you shoulders to your hips if it's not too cold. You might then be able to wrap it round your top tube, because there would be a lot less to fit in there - and it would makes ...


0

I have a 29er cube mountain bike and put light weight mavic crossmax wheels with slick continental sports contact tires and changed the forks for rigid carbon forks and it made a massive diference, kept the disc brakes and gears set is shimano XT, I just dont like road bikes and i can ride this bike fast, you should see the look on road bike riders faces ...


0

If you plan on doing slopestyle/dirt jumping, you'll want at least front suspension in the range of 80-120mm (80-100mm being preferred) and no rear suspension. With larger slopestyle type jumps you may want a full suspension bike, but it's not worth it when you are just learning. On the other hand, if you are looking at doing more street BMX and park style ...


0

Fork travel is limited by frame. You should look for something about 80mm. You could put 140mm fork, but bike geometry will be uncomfortable. XCM basically is just a sprint. Same speed for "down" and "up". If there is local bike club, go to them and ask to try some bike with good fork. Feeling can't be explained :) Gravel feels like tarmac :P XCM is pretty ...


1

Go Singlespeed or use an Internally geared hub to avoid the problem entirely. May need an eccentric bottom bracket or a bike with horizontal dropouts to pull this off without adding dangly bits like a chain tensioner. However, chain tensioner a tend to sit a bit further out of the way and are less likely to be damaged.


1

The derailleur is, unfortunately, one of those critical parts that is very hard to protect from damage; without sacrificing another part. As Batman pointed out, you can purchase small hoops that attach to your frame and offer some protection. As he pointed out though, these types of products might protect the derailleur to some degree, but you risk ...


6

They make bash guards for derailleurs which mount to the frame which protect a derailleur in a crash like but these are dangerous in that they transmit a hit to the derailleur to the frame (and frame damage is typically less repairable/ more expensive than a derailleur damage). Usually, what gets damaged in a crash is the derailleur hanger, which can be ...


1

I use mechanics gloves purchased at the hardware store. Mine are unpadded leather (goatskin) and have saved my hands from several crashes that otherwise would have caused nasty abrasions, judging by the damage to the gloves. "Mechanix" and "Grease Monkey" brand gloves are usually what I see on the hands of local mountain bikers.


1

Recently in my country the only DH gloves that the shops are selling are made of skinny fabric with no padding, so I've turned my head towards motorcycling gear. I have had a two types of gloves by a motorcycling accessory maker. They tend to be sturdier, but also a bit heavier. I don't complain about weight, just acknowledge it. They are so rugged that ...


4

Look at Downhill MTB gloves, they are meant for folks who are likely to crash in the brush and often have padding on fronts of fingers and knuckles and leather palm protection.


0

I use my bicycle for street freestyle stunting.. and from my experience, larger rotors provide better control vs. more stopping power. I use my front brake to do stoppies (a stunt where the front brake is applied to tip the bike onto the front wheel and continue rolling). When I upgraded to a 203mm rotor, I noticed that it required less lever movement to ...


5

I wish they had them 20 years ago when I was much younger and rode much more difficult terrain, with much less respect (aka fear) than I now have. (I ride mostly technical XC, not downhill). As far a protection goes, if the choice is a traditional light weight helmet or one like this, you will be better off with this. It is not an alternate to a down hill ...


-1

If you do shortish rides 20-40 mins grab a spray bottle and spray the brake rotors very lightly tho. It should stop for that period of time if it doesn't stop then it means your brakes are contaminated.


2

It is very possible that during assembly, the pieces were missed. Try to see if you can shift the seat-stay or chain-stay sideways on the pivot. If you can, you definitely need to find another bushing to fit in there. If there is sideways play in that pivot, it will wear out prematurely. You'll also get all sorts of dirt and debris stuck in there, which ...


1

Offhand, that bike looks pretty good for your needs, aside from the front suspension and the 32H wheels. The tires are good and wide, and if you keep them well inflated (above 4 bar) they should handle your weight OK. The front shock has lockout, so if it sags too much you can just keep it locked most of the time. Of course, you will be stressing the ...


3

According to the people at Scott, the general weight limit for a rider is 110 kg. You are significantly above this, so the manufacturer doesn't necessarily support you on that. The wheels durability depends a lot on who built them and how well they were built and if they have taken any damage. You are in a YMMV (and at your own risk) range by sticking with ...


3

I would look at wheelsets that are for your specific riding style. if you're looking to choose a full wheelset from a specific manufacturer (e.g. Mavic) that includes all of hub/rim/spokes and even tire, then go to their websites for more information. These are generally lighter than a normal wheel that you can build up yourself. If you want to build up one ...


4

I-spec is a Shimano-proprietary mounting system for Shimano parts. Its supposed to make mounting and adjusting brake+shift levers faster and easier by putting them on one mounting clamp. I couldn't find a blurb on what it does / how it operates on the Shimano website, but the equivalent for SRAM is SRAM Matchmaker, which from their website: "The ...



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