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2

Make sure he understands the power of the front brake - you can demonstrate this by passing at a constant speed and hitting one of the breaks at a constant pull force - the rear will skid. This one helped me a lot with my riding. Show him how easy it is do do an endo. On a grassy field the risk is zero, the time to learn to get up on the front wheel (and ...


-1

Less likely than the above, but there's also the possibility if you have removable cranks (where the crank arms can be pulled off of the spindle, like the common JIS tapered spindle cranks many mt. bikes have) that both crank arm have come loose from the spindle. Take a look. If you have that type then there's a dust cap in the center of the crank set ...


5

A quick search turned up this post, in which the OP is having the same trouble. It sounds like your crank is swaged to the chainrings, as in this image: "Swaged" means the "spider" (the group of radial arms that hold the chainring) is press-fitted onto the crank arm. A better design is to manufacture the crank arm and spider as one piece, like this: ...


0

I use a Stealth Shield carbon fiber mudguard from Cycle Armour (order at www.cycle-armour.com). It seems to remove about 85% of the dirt from my eyes (more on straights and less on twisty parts). It weighs nothing, looks good, and is very aerodynamic. It actually automatically adjusts if thick mud is encountered.


0

If in doubt leave the fork locked out. If it's a bolt action mechanical cheap version, then I'd take the switch off so it can't be locked on. If it's not hydraulic lockout then don't bother. Work on your smooth high-torque cadence and the lockout won't matter. A good rider will be smooth and not bob up and down.


1

I have now had a road bike for 3 days since i transferred from mountain biker to road biker. I've done just over 50 miles and my experiences so far would be both bikes have pros and cons. The mountain bike is a LOT slower. The width of the tyres being thicker means more surface contact with the road and it slows you down and requires way more effort to ride ...


5

Lets get the social aspects out the way - you can lead a horse to water and all that stuff.....: Hows your relationship - will he listen to you and is he prepared to take clearly well intended advice. Also does he believe he has a problem and does he want to fix it. If any of these answers is no there little you can do except ruin you friendship. Till hes ...


0

It will be your spokes... they will all need tightening (on the drive side at least but get someone to check them all). This can happen if your bike comes assembled from a manufacturer.


1

I happen to own two almost identical mountain bikes other than frame. One aluminum (Orbea) with Niner carbon font fork. And the other an all carbon Niner with Niner carbon front fork. I was looking for a Niner carbon frame and found a whole bike at such a deal I bought it. Both are single speed and tubeless. The all carbon has 2.1 tires compared 2.25 on ...


1

I have done quite a bit of touring on my Surly Long Haul Trucker which includes 1,000 + kilometres of dirt riding 1. On my Surly for such tours I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Mondial HS 428 47-622 tyres and prior to that for an early tour again with a fair bit of dirt roads I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Cross HS 334 700Cx38. Both tyres have proven to be more than ...


2

You have 26" tyres currently, there are certainly "slicker" options available to you. I think its quite easy to obtain tyres which go down to about 1.25" wide. This is not the crazy narrow 23mm (or less) that you might typically see on a road bike (and really, these bikes can only be ridden on the road), but on tarmac/asphalt you'll certainly notice a ...


8

Gravel tires are normally a little knobby: versus completely smooth for a road tire. One strategy is to run a gravel or combination tire in the front and a road tire in the back. A combination tire is one which is nearly slick in the middle with knobs on the sides, so you might want to try one road tire on the back and one gravel tire on the front. ...


3

Look for city or touring tires. Road in bicycle means more of a racing tire. A tire like this go pavement and packed nicely Travel CONTACT. Almost all manufacturers will have tires like this. A road type tread in the middle but a little grip on the edges for if you do sink a little. Great answer from Batman (+1) but I don't think the Gravel Plus is ...


2

As @Daniel said in his comment, use time as he bases for any comparison. I have had MTB rides where I have averaged under 8km/hour, and others where I average over 20km/h over a similar time frame. What does not change is how much effort I put in over that time, but the consistency of that effort does. What I find difficult transitioning from MTB to Road ...


2

Often while mountain biking a twig or rock will get stuck between the swing arms on your front derailleur. This effectively locks the derailleur in place until the rock/twig works itself out. If it happens again, stop and examine the derailleur. Generally you can't see the obstruction while you're riding.


4

(As requested, turned comment into answer.) - This question pops up quite often. Most often the riders cadence is too low. Presuming 26" wheels with 2" tires, 42/11 at a cadence of 80 is 38km/h, at 100 its 47km/h. What speeds are you riding at? If you are maintaining these speeds on a solo commute on a MTB, you should get in touch with your national ...


0

There are two issues. Will the chainring and crank clear the stays? Many modern MTB's are designed to only have a maximum chain ring of 44t or so. They are also designed for the relatively wide Q-factor of MTB cranks vs road cranks. Can you get the front derailler high enough to accommodate the larger chain ring? Switching to a single ring in ...


4

Yes, but with some caveats: Road rings are big. You might have clearance issues with the chainstays. Bottom bracket. You might need a new bottom bracket to fit the spindle or change the spacing. New chain. Bigger rings require more chain (usually). Front derailleur. Derailleurs are meant to handle certain sizes, spacings, and mountings, your current one ...



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