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1

The "front pedal crank gears" are called chainrings. Just searching for the word should find several options. There are several different bolt circle diameters for 5-bolt mountain bike chainrings. It's best to measure. Aftermarket parts from brands other than Shimano are fine, look for chainrings designed for 8 speeds or less and correct bolt circle ...


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I have read about damaged lockout systems from big hits while locked, so my advise is treat a locked fork as a fragile fork unless you want an expensive repair bill. Probably the key point is what is "a hard hit" and "high load" for a fork? That said, I have taken a couple of what I would call big hits with my fork locked with no damage, but I weigh under ...


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Suspension forks with lock outs also have blow-off valves for exactly this sort of situation. It takes a really hard hit to damage the fork. You'll more likely dent your rim first.


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An easy answer directly from Schwalbe website: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/profil.html "Many MTB tires are marked with a “FRONT” and a “REAR” arrow. The “FRONT” arrow indicates the recommended rolling direction for the front wheel and respectively the “REAR” arrow is the direction for the rear wheel."


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I suspect "H/E" means "Hook-edged". This would apply to almost every MTB rim. I have two bikes with slicks on MTB rims. I currently use Schwalbe Kojak 26 x 1.35" on one, and Schwalbe Marathon Racer 26 x 1.5" on the other.


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Even though I am commenting long after the this question is already answered, I think it is worthwhile to point out some safety information. The pins of modern 9 speed and up chains are mushroomed at the ends to prevent prying the chain apart with lateral force when changing gears. Because of this, not only should pins no longer be re-used, but the ...


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The point is to get the chain untangled. Once you do that, you can remount the derailleur, feed the chain through it and you are home. Tangles are hard. Even a photo won't help. The good news is that there isn't too much to play with, so just playing should get you there.


3

I would guess, without seeing a photo (if my explain explanation below doesn't work, perhaps you could post one), that what has happened is that the chain has doubled back on itself. It will look like it is tangled, but in fact it is not. Let me try to explain how to sort it out… Pick a spot on the chain to start, I'd suggest where it comes off of the ...


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The size of a bike has very little to do with the wheel size. For example, if you look at the Surly Instigator with 26 inch wheels, the smallest size has an effective top tube of 55.5 cm, and a reach of 37.8 cm. Compare that to the Trek X-Calibre which on the smallest model uses 27.5 inch wheels but has an effective top tube of 52.5 mm and a reach of 35.2 ...


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There are plenty of mountain bikes with 26" wheels, and they're not hard to find. I have no idea why you'd even ask that. If you have disk brakes, then yes, you can put on smaller wheels. The only problem with that: your cranks will be closer to the ground, so there's a greater chance of hitting your pedals when you're cornering or riding over a log or ...


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There are a variety of bikes with the same wheelsize. A few companies, such as Surly, still make mountain bikes with 26" wheels. A lot make 27.5" wheels, and a ton make 29" wheel based bikes. I believe Jamis also made 26" wheel bikes until quite recently. Provided the hub spacing is the same and you have disc brakes and an appropriate rotor, you can just ...


2

Those darn spiky things are called thorns. Where I'm from there are cactuses that hide in the grass in some places and are notorious for puncturing bike tires. The solution is to use tire sealant in your tubes. Out here most people use "Slime," you can buy slime brand tubes or just buy the slime and inject it in through your valve. It works almost instantly, ...


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There are various manufacturers out there who offer puncture resistant tires and liners. All of them sacrifice weight for puncture resistance. I would highly recommend you look into running tubeless tires. When you pick up thorns, you can simply remove them, spin the wheel, add some air (if needed) and keep riding. They require much less effort if you ...


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I generally use the cartridge brakes because I they are easier to replace. Just pull the cotter pin and slide out the old one, slide in the new one, replace the cotter pin and you are done. Don't have to re-setup the brakes. Another plus is the spares take up less space. You can get various compounds with each type. The non-cartridge type have more ...


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It could be an bad valve. I had a run of flats on one bike and was sure it was something wrong in the wheel. Turns out I hadn't replaced the tubes in a long time so the tubes I installed were also old. Both failed where the stem meets the tube. The pressure needed to be high and it took about 45mins to go flat.


5

A few quick points about the article The author did not provide all the math and formulations so we need to take it on faith that the correct formulae were used and there are not implementation errors. The author also only considered one bike, the 2015 Giant Reign 27.5". Finally, the results seem reasonable to me. The main take home from the article ...


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There's little difference between the two types as far as braking performance is concerned, as you can easily find the same pad compound in both types. I've been able to easily find Salmon Kool Stop brake shoes that fit the vintage Mafac brakes on my Peugeot 12 speed. That being said, the one issue you may run into is the lack of the correct inserts, which ...


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So I guess there are two parts, cause and how to fix it, so first causes: No rim tape - sometimes new bikes won't have rim tape, and the tube can get slightly cut on spoke holes, if you don't have rim tape, put some in, it will save you in the long run Rim has something sharp on it - rarely you might find that a rim has a little bit of metal sticking out ...



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