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2

Four factors I can think of bike tires riding style conditioning If the bicycle has full suspension then less vibration. Carbon frame will absorb vibration. The fit of the bike is a huge factor. Larger tires at lower pressure will absorb vibration. Can run tubeless tires at lower pressure. If you are running smaller tires then go to a bigger ...


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That isn't a cross bike. First, make sure the bike fits you. If it doesn't, its not really worth restoring (give it to someone who could use it). It looks to be spec'd with relatively cheap stuff, so I wouldn't sink a lot of money into it. The first thing to check is if the frame has any major cracks or damage. If that is in good condition, check the ...


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A bike gets into that age that parts get harder to find and more expensive. That bike looks aluminum. I would not put much money in it. If you can lube it up and put new rubber on it then great. I have a steel Bianchi 7 speed with XT and I am still reluctant to put much money in it. Can get cassette and a lot of the running gear - problem is shifters ...


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The picture is a RD-M780-SGS long cage. Shimano have three codes for rear derailleur length: Short - SS Medium - GS Long - SGS I'm not aware of where this is printed on the RD though so not so helpful. However Shimano only have one non-clutched XT Dyna-Sys (10 speed) RD the RD-M780-SGS (long cage 43t capacity). The clutched (shadow+) RDs come in GS ...


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Very simply, short cages look quite short and long cages look quite long, especially so when compared side by side ( indeed, your photo is of a long cage ). Short cages typically have just a centimeter or so of space between the two pulleys, and well, you can see that a long cage has considerably more to accommodate the extra chain length needed for larger ...


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I do not believe there is any such thing as a "medium" cage XT derailleur, just long and extended. Medium and short cages are typically the domain of road/touring drive trains, as they use more compact gearing on the cassettes. All modern XT derailleurs appear to have can take the same cassette range (e.g., one, two, three) while some have a little extra ...


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The 2007 Giant Anthem Advanced had a 80mm fork. To maintain the geometry and handling of the bike you should select a similar travel fork. Other things specifications are: 26" wheel size 1 1/8" straight steerer


3

The first thing to note is that the frame has to fit you. Also, the frame and rear suspension should be known to be in good condition before you buy the frame as well - this is especially important for carbon due to its failure modes. If you don't have experience with this [and it sounds like you don't, given Fox pretty much makes shocks for everybody], you ...


6

Air will escape, one of the biggest problems with Ghetto tubeless (unfortunate, but long established name for this technique) and not using specific tubeless ready or UST (tubeless standard) tires is that you need to inflate your tires a lot. At worst for every ride. The tires often do roll off the rim. Not every combination of Ghetto tubeless will work ...


2

My answer is going to be a non-answer in the sense that shoe sizes are not really the same even among most types of shoes. As an example, when I buy shoes, I normally buy (in US sizes) 12.5 wide /13 in New Balance (which feels fine), 13 in Nike (which feels fine or slightly tight), 13 in Adidas (which typically feel tight), something bigger for boots ...


4

1) Loosen the two bolts, holding the caliper of the front brake. It should move freely sideways now. 2) Hold tight the front brake lever. The caliper will bite into the disc. 3) Tighten the bolts to the point when moving the caliper is possible, but requires a push by hand. 4) Lift the front wheel and validate that it doesn't rub. If it rubs try ...


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I hate to say it but this is why it's advisable to go to a bike shop, if you're not sure about setting things up. You raise a couple of points: Front disk brake. Regarding your original problem, the rotor should not rub against the pads, period. There should be no contact unless you're actually braking. And when you stop braking, the pads should sit back. ...



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