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0

As others wrote, first tune your fork, and keep it clean. I use some silicon spray as well on the stanchion tubes and dust seals. If you have coil spring in your fork (not air only), be sure it's for your weight - if not, swap it. If still not satisfied, you can check how low or high-end is the damper cartridge in your fork. Cheaper forks can feel OK but not ...


0

For a front wheel you need to match size (29") and width (not critical - look at similar tire size), hub (Being cheap its probably 9mmQR but there is also 15mmQR and 20mmQR) and rotor size. The rotor size was probably 160mm, but may have been 180mm (They don't give it in the specs). If you end up with the wrong size on the wheel, its easy to change the ...


2

There are 3 things to worry about and you've covered two. Size, the wheel rim should match the current size. Brake compatibility, if you have disc brakes you need a compatible hub, could be 6 bolt or centerlock. It has to be compatible with the rotor you will also purchase. If you have rim brakes you would purchase a rim brake compatible rim. (you can use ...


1

You have previously been able to purchase replacement Fox Kashima CSUs (crown/ steerer/ upper) that many companies will install as an aftermarket option on OEM forks. Not that you would notice, as user2480585 has stated bumpiness of a ride is generally a tune issue rather than a fork issue. The 32 Evolution is a more than capable fork and if you were an ...


0

I assume you actually want to run tubeless, since you mention sealant. It may depend on which rim you have. Actual Tubless or tubeless-ready? An example of tubeless-ready rims are the popular line of Stan's rims. They have a special design they call socket-beat tech, which will grip a non-UST tyre better than a standard rim, to resist burping etc. I ...


1

Depends on your fitness, back strength and duration of your rides. You choose the Hardtail (front suspension) if you want the fastest ride, and you are able to stand up on the most bumpy sections, including bumpy sections that are flat or slightly downhill, where you benefit from pedaling. The hardtail will be lighter, and more stiff and efficient at ...


2

I would Make sure your sag is set correctly. See fork manual. Place a zip-tie on your fork leg to act as a max-travel gauge, it lets you see how far from bottoming out you were on any ride and will aid you with tuning. Play with the compression/rebound settings on your current fork. If ride is too harsh, reduce both. If you are unable to smooth out the ...


0

I disagree with most of what has been said here. A full suspension bike is more comfortable, rides better, is easier for your body on longer rides and it is just better than hardtails in pretty much everything. For example, if you take a look at MTB XC World Cup you will see a lot of pros riding a full suspension, and keep in mind that even though their only ...


0

Just looking over the specs (having not heard of the brand before here in the US), I'd say what you have is a decent entry level bike. With the Suntour XCM-DS forks on there I'd probably avoid doing any jumps. I'f I'm right, it looks like the fork has adjustable pre-load; if so make sure to tighten it up enough to keep it from bottoming out, if not you may ...


3

Looking at the component specs, its an entry level MTB, one better than a BSO. 80% of mountain biking is about the rider and his skills, not the bike. Shops won't tell you this, as telling you your riding skills matter most does not end in a sale of a newer season/more expensive bike. Cashed up middle aged execs won't either - many just want you to see ...


1

There really isn't much required to make a MTB into a formidable city bike. The obvious thing is to change tires. But I wouldn't actually recommend to go for something skinny just something not knobby. Skinny tires offer very little advantage but absorb a lot less of the bumps encountered in city driving which makes them less comfortable and put the wheels ...


2

In my opinion it's a fallacy to believe that a city bike should have thin tires and in fact if you look at bikes that are specifically marketed as city bikes (and don't aim at the hipster single speed crowd) they often come with quite wide tires. Wide tires offer much more dampening and the difference in rolling resistance is much smaller than once ...


7

Presumably that's 52 cm. Generally, a crack in an Al frame (or most frames), especially in an area which gets a lot of stress makes it scrap (esp. if its supposed to be used off road). Given this, I'd scrap this frame.


0

If only one side is creaking, it's probably the pedal or crank arm not screwed tight. So first tight them up (for the pedal you probably need a special wrench, for crank arm it's a 8mm hex or 14mm wrench). You should tight it as fast as you can, as it can brake the crank arm. When both sides are creaking, it could be that both sides are loose, but it also ...


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There are quite a few options here, and this troubleshoot resource, http://sheldonbrown.com/creaks.html#bottom may help shed light on why more information would help us identify the problem. You may even be able to identify the problem yourself with that page and the glossery http://sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html


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I've made 1700 km before I changed my pads (just rear - front pads are still OK, at about 50%). I had resin pads and now I have switched to sintered metal - so far not too loud, but breaking force is better. I have Shimano BR-M395 hydraulic brakes, and IMHO they are great (not perfect, but in city - more than enough for me).


-1

http://www.lancasterarchery.com/x-spot-huntsman-camo-armguard.html I use a arm guard for shooting archery ... they come in several sizes styles and colors ... been using them for my pant leg for years... quick on and off and they work perfect ... Lot more durable than the neoprene and dosent make my leg sweat. . ...


0

It sounds like you have a broken or worn shifter. Grip shifters have small plastic teeth inside them. The teeth loosely mesh so that it will move when twisted but tight enough to maintain the selected gear. These shifters are still common and relatively inexpensive generally around $10 US.


2

To add a rear disc brake you must have a frame with a disc mount. You will also need a rear wheel that has a disc compatible hub. Unless you find a really good deal on something used you will spend more than the bike is worth. If you feel the rear V brakes were insufficient, your money would be better spent getting quality shoes for the rear. Some riders ...


1

I also like speed and racing, but after some close calls (nowhere close to yours) I decided to push my limits going UPHILL, go faster in that 17% climb where 10 mph is the speed of light. And outside of bicycles, there are infinite challenges, running a mile under 5 minutes, learning to swim butterfly, or in strength training, going for the gimnastic ...


4

I am not a doctor, but its sound like you might be suffering Post Traumatic Stress, and should seek professional help to rule it out or get treatment. You should be concerned about the 10 critical accidents (I read critical that as hospital/doctors visits and time off school/work, not a mere "off" ). You are likely riding beyond you limits, and need to ...


0

The most comprehensive guide on bottom brackets online I know of is here. You can replace the square taper bottom bracket with a Hollowtech II bottom bracket and use a compatible crankset with that bottom bracket. The particular crank you choose should be such that your derailleurs are able to handle it.


0

The new bottom bracket will fit as long as it is of the same thread and type. The Trek uses an English thread bearing. Shimano also says that you must use a mountain bottom bracket with a mountain crank. The new crank must be pretty close to the same tooth count as the original. The front derailleur is designed to work with a limited range of ring gears. If ...


1

I think that with a well-running bike you ought to be able to do three things: The wheels ought to spin -- life each wheel in turn off the ground and set it spinning with your hand: it ought to spin and spin and spin almost without ever slowing down, almost frictionless The tires shouldn't absorb energy -- that means you don't want knobbly tires because ...


2

Given that the Schwinn sidewinder is a Walmart bike, you're best off getting a new bike. We call these BSO's or bike shaped objects. By the time you get a basic suspension fork, you'll be spending more than the bike after installation, whereas you could easily buy a good used entry level front suspension mountain bike (say, a Specialized Hard Rock or Trek ...


0

First of all, make sure you really have a 1 1/8" fork. Most threaded forks are 1". Remove the top nut on the headset, and measure the outside of the steering tube with vernier calipers - that's the dimension you're interested in. If it is 1 1/8", then yes, absolutely, you can install a threadless fork. You'll need a new headset and new stem. You can re-use ...


0

Yes, you can use a 1 1/8" fork with a 1 1/2" frame. I did it on one of my bikes. You just have to get a special "reducer" headset. It doesn't look goofy at all - you can't even tell unless you look closely. You'll have to get a threadless fork. Nobody makes reducer headsets for threaded forks. Most new forks come with an un-cut steering tube - that means ...


1

At a minimum lube the chain and see what is scraping. For the brakes just hold the bike up with one hand and spin the tire. Visually inspect if the rim is rubbing on the brake. Some times you can just adjust the brake and some times the wheel(s) need to be trued. Some times you have the tire rubbing on the brake. At this point need to decide if it is ...


5

Since it's a new-to-you secondhand bike, for safety's sake as well as to deal with the sluggishness I recommend you take it to a bike shop for a complete overhaul. I'll bet you'll be astounded at the difference when they're done.


1

First thing you can try is to disassemble and grease the bearings with the proper stuff. To do that you have to do the following: 1) Disassemble them as unscrewing the cones' contra nut and the cones themselves. 2) Wipe the old grease with something ( I am doing it with toilet paper ) 3) Wipe every individual ball of the hub. 4) After everything is clean, ...


0

I think a more practical solution to your problem of forgetting to lock your bike would be a device (or method) to remind you to lock it. You could try a bluetooth proximity alarm tag. You pair the tag with your phone, then attach the tag to your bike. When the phone gets out of range of the tag an alarm goes off on the phone (range is typically around 10 ...


6

There are locks that can be unlocked with your cell phone, but none of them lock your bike automatically. I'm pretty sure the product you are looking for doesn't exist. The reason this doesn't exist is because it wouldn't be possible. You could build a lock that would automatically lock the wheels based on a proximity detector linked to your cell phone. ...


0

This answer will probably garner a lot of downvotes, but I'll say the best lock is no lock at all. I haven't used a bike lock in years. I don't ever leave my bikes somewhere that I feel the need to have them locked. My bikes are secured in my domicile, in a similar situation at work, and anywhere else they don't leave my sight. There are many different ...



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