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10

I don't know that you can do this with the apps you are talking about. However there is hope. Going back to first principles, you have a pc on which you want to create your route, and you have an android device which you want to stick on your bike and use for navigation. Correct? If you accept that you need to abandon Google Maps altogether, there are ...


8

I have a background in developing consumer GPS systems...... There is no doubt that a Garmin is a much better device for the job. On cell phones, GPS and associated functionality is the side dish - as in "would you like fries with your burger", on a Garmin, is the Raison d'ĂȘtre. Hardware wise, its a no brainier. First, as already mentioned in @armb ...


6

Have you tried "Get there by bike"? http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/get-there-by-bike-interactive/id457288250?mt=8 The few times i tried it i had good results. Another alternative, but i have not used yet. http://www.bikemapsapp.com/


5

Just verified that the 510 can be attached to power while on/in use. It continues to operate. When the external power source is removed, it will give a message to that effect, but does not power down (like the nuvi/car versions do). Note that you (obviously) have to open the weather seal to plug in power. Also worth noting, the 510 will go into a different ...


5

I spent all last summer biking around Ireland, France, Italy (a bit), and Germany with my wife. We went with map and compass to avoid being dependent on a battery to not get lost. Map Scale. In general, you need at least 1:250k map scale in my opinion. More detailed (i.e., 1:200k or less) is nice, but you can end up buying/schlepping a lot of maps that ...


4

They do not have an app, but I typically use the Course Creator on http://bikeroutetoaster.com/ to plan new rides. It gives you elevation profile and will allow you to print the cue sheets. You can export the GPX/TCX data to upload to a GPS device for on screen turn by turn cues (depending on your device). Another good option for finding new routes is to ...


4

I would use GPS for wilder trips, and a combination of online services and paper roadmaps for more civilized trips. Both ways of doing it generate some dependency and some indepencence: With GPS, you depend on the battery, but you know your position in realtime, and if your device has embedded mapping you virtually never need to stop and ask for ...


3

If you are in the UK, use CycleStreets. It's a free journey-planning website designed specifically for cycling, so it can route you across off-road cycle tracks and bridges, and it gives you a choice of faster routes for more confident cyclists, and quieter routes if you want to avoid traffic. As well as the main and a mobile website, they have free apps for ...


3

The simplest on-the-road solution is to get a detailed paper (walker's?) map with contour lines. In the UK, Ordnance Survey provide these, for the USA you could try Omnimap. Alternatively, there are plenty of online tools, like freemaptools.com which use Google Maps. You click on a point and it gives you the elevation.


3

Barometric pressure is not the only feasible method to track altitude, but is by far the more practical in terms of power requirements (I have a watch that lasts 2 years on a battery with altitude), size and cost. GPS Altitude is wildly inaccurate due to the geometry of the satellites. Unfortunately to cope with very small signal errors you need a ...


3

Mobile is the way to go. Forget cycling computer. Cycling computer can't connect to computer wirelessly, your mobile can. I've stopped logging my rides on my mac, my mobile do this for me automatically and I can access the logs from anywhere. You get maps for free on your mobile from the internet and you don't have to update your map. You don't need ...


2

There is one use case I think will suit you greatly if you get your phone to work AND get some app that saves GPX files (I think most GPS-oriented apps do that): When you go out for a ride, you turn the phone on, get a GPS position, throw it in your back pocket and forget it. When you get back home, you transfer the GPX file to some service (Strava and ...


2

The Garmin is waterproof, and has a resistive touchscreen that works with gloves. It has an ANT+ receiver for use with cadence sensors etc., and most phones don't. Battery life will be better than most phones. I suspect the Garmin will be easier to load maps onto than a phone with no plan, but many mapping apps do allow you to load data for later use without ...


2

My solution to the problem is to grab my phone, record my biking trajectory with sports tracker (no data plan is needed) and get an estimation of the elevation (total number of meters uphill, and total number of meters downhill) with the help of GPS. For this you'll have to have: a smart phone with a gps (android, apple ios, nokia, or microsoft phone) ...


2

I just completed a 300K brevet last weekend and my Garmin 500 ran out of juice about 2 miles from the end of the 190 miles. 18 hours. I just tried to plug it into an external battery that will charge phones and the Garmin 500, but the Garmin will not operate while plugged in and charging. Note this is the Garmin 500, not the 510. A friend used an 810 on the ...


1

If you are planning your tour for Europe, you can give komoot a try. It offers exactly that: Planning a route on PC, synchronizing it with your Android or iOS device, and letting your mobile device navigate you along your route - even with voice navigation. However, you have to pay for voice navigation and offline maps. You pay for each "region" where you ...


1

Also consider Co-Rider ( https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/co-rider/id538095358?mt=8). I have used it for turn-by-turn successfully and it does allow for GPX import although I can't confirm that you'll find both features working together. Good luck.


1

Will you be planning your route beforehand, or will it all be on an ad hoc basis? I suspect if you're going to do everything ad-hoc, then you will need an array of maps. I guess the most difficult thing here will be translating a path on the map into a daily rideable distance. However I have gone touring with a pre-planned route so I can certainly say what ...


1

I had a big clip that was supposed to be used to accept a ball attachment for like your windshield suction cup style cell phone holder and you could just clip it to something like a basket or a laptop screen or whatever. It had a strong spring and could be used to mount to that book holder basket thing, but for the life of me I can't find anything similar!! ...


1

Phone Attachment: I would need to get better views of the front of the bike. Probably fab something starting with an existing mount (looks like you started down that direction). Map Case: It looks like you already have a map case, if not, do a search. If you take one that will fit more or less in the gap on the bar and add some lengths of double sided ...


1

There's a new free app called Bikepath Country that has simple point A to point B cycling directions. You can also get suggested rides for any area. It's available on Android and iPhone, so whichever you decide to stay with/go to! iPhone: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bikepath/id513898258?mt=8 Website with more info: http://www.bikepathcountry.com



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