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11

I don't know that you can do this with the apps you are talking about. However there is hope. Going back to first principles, you have a pc on which you want to create your route, and you have an android device which you want to stick on your bike and use for navigation. Correct? If you accept that you need to abandon Google Maps altogether, there are ...


8

I have a background in developing consumer GPS systems...... There is no doubt that a Garmin is a much better device for the job. On cell phones, GPS and associated functionality is the side dish - as in "would you like fries with your burger", on a Garmin, is the Raison d'ĂȘtre. Hardware wise, its a no brainier. First, as already mentioned in @armb ...


6

Have you tried "Get there by bike"? http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/get-there-by-bike-interactive/id457288250?mt=8 The few times i tried it i had good results. Another alternative, but i have not used yet. http://www.bikemapsapp.com/


5

I mostly use it for tracking rides after the fact, but Ride With GPS has cue sheets and route planning based off of Google maps for their paying members. From the GPS side, it works great, your mileage may vary for pre-planning.


5

I spent all last summer biking around Ireland, France, Italy (a bit), and Germany with my wife. We went with map and compass to avoid being dependent on a battery to not get lost. Map Scale. In general, you need at least 1:250k map scale in my opinion. More detailed (i.e., 1:200k or less) is nice, but you can end up buying/schlepping a lot of maps that ...


5

Just verified that the 510 can be attached to power while on/in use. It continues to operate. When the external power source is removed, it will give a message to that effect, but does not power down (like the nuvi/car versions do). Note that you (obviously) have to open the weather seal to plug in power. Also worth noting, the 510 will go into a different ...


4

Mobile is the way to go. Forget cycling computer. Cycling computer can't connect to computer wirelessly, your mobile can. I've stopped logging my rides on my mac, my mobile do this for me automatically and I can access the logs from anywhere. You get maps for free on your mobile from the internet and you don't have to update your map. You don't need ...


4

If you are in the UK, use CycleStreets. It's a free journey-planning website designed specifically for cycling, so it can route you across off-road cycle tracks and bridges, and it gives you a choice of faster routes for more confident cyclists, and quieter routes if you want to avoid traffic. As well as the main and a mobile website, they have free apps for ...


4

They do not have an app, but I typically use the Course Creator on http://bikeroutetoaster.com/ to plan new rides. It gives you elevation profile and will allow you to print the cue sheets. You can export the GPX/TCX data to upload to a GPS device for on screen turn by turn cues (depending on your device). Another good option for finding new routes is to ...


4

I would use GPS for wilder trips, and a combination of online services and paper roadmaps for more civilized trips. Both ways of doing it generate some dependency and some indepencence: With GPS, you depend on the battery, but you know your position in realtime, and if your device has embedded mapping you virtually never need to stop and ask for ...


3

The simplest on-the-road solution is to get a detailed paper (walker's?) map with contour lines. In the UK, Ordnance Survey provide these, for the USA you could try Omnimap. Alternatively, there are plenty of online tools, like freemaptools.com which use Google Maps. You click on a point and it gives you the elevation.


3

Barometric pressure is not the only feasible method to track altitude, but is by far the more practical in terms of power requirements (I have a watch that lasts 2 years on a battery with altitude), size and cost. GPS Altitude is wildly inaccurate due to the geometry of the satellites. Unfortunately to cope with very small signal errors you need a ...


3

Good quality road maps will differentiate between paved and unpaved roads. I really like my Gazetteer State Maps


3

Yes, you should be able to use a Garmin Oregon that way. A Garmin Oregon can do almost anything that a Garmin Edge (GPS bike computer) can do. The exact details will depend a lot on exactly which Oregon and Edge models you're comparing. Most of the current Oregon models actually can connect to a heartrate or cadence sensor via ANT or Bluetooth. They can ...


2

I think mapmyride.com is pretty good for mapping out routes. They do allow you to print routes, although I prefer to use the Android app.


2

I use the Garmin 800 and an external battery with USB output. The Garmin will keep running for days like that, with no backlight BUT the data recording cannot cope with a 24 hour bike ride. On my last two 24 hour cycle events, the Garmin corrupted the activity file at around 23 hours which was somewhat 'annoying'. I have tested it on distance, with car ...


2

The Garmin is waterproof, and has a resistive touchscreen that works with gloves. It has an ANT+ receiver for use with cadence sensors etc., and most phones don't. Battery life will be better than most phones. I suspect the Garmin will be easier to load maps onto than a phone with no plan, but many mapping apps do allow you to load data for later use without ...


2

There is one use case I think will suit you greatly if you get your phone to work AND get some app that saves GPX files (I think most GPS-oriented apps do that): When you go out for a ride, you turn the phone on, get a GPS position, throw it in your back pocket and forget it. When you get back home, you transfer the GPX file to some service (Strava and ...


2

My solution to the problem is to grab my phone, record my biking trajectory with sports tracker (no data plan is needed) and get an estimation of the elevation (total number of meters uphill, and total number of meters downhill) with the help of GPS. For this you'll have to have: a smart phone with a gps (android, apple ios, nokia, or microsoft phone) ...


2

Google Maps for iPhone now has bike layer support and bike-specific navigation starting with update on July 16, 2013, version 2.0


2

Edge 800 can be charged from a hub dynamo I use a B&M Luxos IQ2 U to provide the power and the standard Garmin cable


2

I just completed a 300K brevet last weekend and my Garmin 500 ran out of juice about 2 miles from the end of the 190 miles. 18 hours. I just tried to plug it into an external battery that will charge phones and the Garmin 500, but the Garmin will not operate while plugged in and charging. Note this is the Garmin 500, not the 510. A friend used an 810 on the ...


2

Yes you can charge the Edge 500 whilst riding at the same time, and record your ride as well. http://www.joewein.net/blog/2013/03/04/garmin-edge-usb-power-hack/


2

A generic USB cable will have the Edge switch to storage mode but I've found the Garmin cables allow charging whilst using. I have an external battery pack which I used on day-long back-country rides in the alps and could plug it in whilst on a chairlift or at a bar without interrupting the tracking. Arguably I didn't need to but it does mean that when I get ...


2

The Oregon series only reads your speed and distance from the GPS which is not always as accurate as classic speed sensors - from my experience the difference can be up to 4-5% depending on the terrain. And you will probably have to buy a separate handlebar mount, because they are not provided in the box as far as I know. You can use Garmin Connect, so ...


2

I use the Garmin Oregon 450 as a cycling GPS and I am quite happy with it. I don't have the speed/cadence sensor, but I plan to get it soon. According to the documentation it supports ANT+ sensors like the heart rate meter and the cadence sensor. Apparently it doesn't work with the speed part of the speed/cadence sensor but the cadence part does work. The ...


2

The RideWithGPS Android and iPhone apps now also offers this with subscription payment. http://ridewithgps.com/app As mentioned before, the RideWithGPS website is useful for trip planning, you can customize your cue sheets, save maps and route for offline use, etc.


1

Also consider Co-Rider ( https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/co-rider/id538095358?mt=8). I have used it for turn-by-turn successfully and it does allow for GPX import although I can't confirm that you'll find both features working together. Good luck.


1

Since you state that "any method" would do, and taking into account that there are several arguments against GPS, I would suggest a couple of non technology solutions to the problem you have with barometric altitude. You want to use altitude information for goal setting, wich I assume requires more precision than simple route tracking, for wich GPS ...


1

RideWithGps.com does exactly what you want; you can plot a route ahead of time and it will show you the elevation profile.



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