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11

They squeal because water acts as a mild lubricant. That's why things are "slippery when wet" ;) The water makes it harder for the pads to grab onto the rotors. They'll grab for a small fraction of a second and then let go again, and they do this really fast. Imagine the squeaky sound that a your finger makes when your run it over a smooth wet surface, or ...


11

Most of the noise comes from pawls on the freewheel hitting against the splines on the engagment surfaces which makes up the racheting unit. Some reasons for the noise between freewheels? Tension on pawls could be higher causing more noise as they glide over the engagment surfaces High end freewheels have more pawls and engagement points than lower end ...


9

I picked up a set of interlocking rubber tiles (for gym equipment) at Home Depot to put under my trainer and bike. They help with the vibration although I find it's still quite loud. It also helps having neighbours that are noisier than me, they can't really complain about the bike.


9

Baffling - place it on carpet or a rug (and several towels), this will both stop vibration through the floor and catch the drips of sweat.


9

There are a few causes for brake 'squealing': New pads. After a bit of wear (or sandpapering), the squealing will stop. Misalignment. As some others have mentioned, misalignment may cause squealing (although it would be reduced with some wear). Check out Sheldon Brown's tips for alignment suggestions. Oil or water on the rim. Either of these substances, ...


9

You may need to adjust your derailer limit stops (see here).


8

Likely some coarse particles get in between the chain elements and also between the parts of the derailleur and the star wheels. After you cycle for a while those particles either fall out or get crushed into finer particles and thus the noise goes away.


8

buy cases of beer with the cardboard dividers between the bottles. You can then re-use the cardboard dividers in other cases of beer.


7

The only way that I've found to get them to stop squeaking is to burn the water off. Big steep hill and stop at the bottom. As for performance, I don't notice any difference in the feel of my BB7's in the wet vs. the dry after a couple seconds of use. Even in rain puddles up to the bottom bracket.


7

Brakes have to be toed in. What that means is that the front of the brake pad has to touch the rim before the back of the brake pad. It does not have to be an extreme variance but it will make a world of difference when properly adjusted. Hopefully you have aluminum rims. I have had the misfortune of working on some bikes with steel rims from which I ...


7

Roller Brakes (a form of drum brake) do need a regular service, which does require grease (yes it does seem weird to grease brakes) as there are some moving parts that can rub. You should be able to buy some Roller Brake grease/oil and apply to the appropriate location. I am not 100% familiar with Roller Brakes, so you may need to check the location in your ...


7

Your hub has a normal freewheel, like described by Matt Adams (ratchet with pawls). There are some models which have spring-loaded cilinders mounted around "tilted" teeth: when you spin it to one side, the cilinders slip. When you spin it to the other side, the cilinders are caught between opposite surfaces, and torque is transmitted by friction (there is ...


7

Could be any number of things. The first thing to check (because ignoring it can rapidly cause expensive damage) is that the crank arms are tight. Even if they don't seem loose it doesn't hurt to put a wrench on the fixing bolts and torque them a bit. (If one moves more than a small amount, get a torque wrench and do them up right.) Likewise with the ...


6

I think it's a problem that must be solved on a one-off basis, since there so many different fender/bike combinations. First make sure the connections are really tight. Often they work loose over time. Then try to observe what's rattling. Some heavy tape applied to points that tend to knock against the bike frame may help. Different fenders that are ...


6

I use rubber patches from used tubes. It not always look nice, but besides dampening the rattling itself, they also dampen the sound propagation along the fender (depending of course on the amount of rubber). EVA could also be a good alternative. Other think I sometimes have to make is to preload the metal plates which run from side to side along the ...


6

It has consistently worked for me: Disassemble everything around the zone of noise suspicion, namely remove the handlebar from the stem and separate every bolt and washer away from each other; Clean them with light solvent or oil (the idea is not to degrease, but more to remove dust/rust/dirt and to allow a residual layer of lubrication to remain); Apply ...


6

The noise is coming from your handlebars, but in my experience noises can be deceptive. It may be your stem-handlebar interface, but it may not be isolated to that one spot. The first thing to check is that the tabs on the face plate are not meeting the body of the stem when everything is torqued down. If you can see a gap there, you should be ok. If they ...


6

You may want to read up on how to tune a rear derailluer, but if you just want to get going, all that is needed is a minor adjustment using the barrel screw (clearly seen in the video) where the cable comes in. Turn the screw clockwise 1/4 turn at a time, and the chain will move away from the cog (The cassette is the full set of cogs). Trick is not to make ...


5

How do you lubricate the chain? The proper way (in my view) is to drip a drop of lubricant on each chain-link, and then cycle through all the gears. It sounds as if the lubricant is not yet properly distributed when you start cycling. How aggressively do you degrease and clean? Removing gunk, sand, dust, etc. Is necessary, but if you clean it really really ...


5

I think it's impossible for it to be coming from the bottom bracket while the pedals are not turning. More likely it's coming from the rear hub. I'd first check whether the spoke guard (if you have one) has come loose and is rubbing against the cluster. And inspect the area behind the cluster for any piece of trash that has gotten in there. Failing that, ...


5

My all-weather commuter bike has discs. In my experience, cleaning the discs with window cleaner (e.g. Windex) reduces the squealing. Allegedly, better results can be had by cleaning with automotive brake disc cleaner, but I've not yet tried this.


5

Street Cred? I've almost lost trail ridding buddies due to squeaking brakes. Keep the pads clean and you'll brake much more quietly (unless your skidding and trying to be loud). Its most likely oil or other grimy substance built up on the pads. It can fly off your chain if you spin the cranks to help work in fresh lube. I try to be extra careful on my ...


5

Short answer. Hub integrity can not really be judged by noise alone, but by feel. If you feel it slipping under load the hub could be damaged beyond repair. The quiet smooth feel, but working normally is just a good, sealed hub that the manufacturer built in a way that has smaller or less splines. The full monty. A free wheel hub consists of a few key ...


5

I have a Rohloff and have sent some emails to the factory due to severe oil spill (had to replace the seals, successfully). From what they have told me, the 25ml of oil is more than double the necessary amount for the hub to work fine, since the oil is very sticky and it distributes inside the hub. Even the unavoidable oil "sweating" should be considered ...


5

Are you positive it's coming from the handlebar to stem interface? Creaking sounds are notoriously hard to diagnose. It's highly possible that the noise could be from the stem to steer tube interface or your headset or the spacers on your steer tube or topcap or another source, while it may sound like it's coming from your handlebars. Also, be cautious with ...


4

Since you don't hear the noise when the bike is up on the stand, the problem is probably linked to the load of your weight on the bike (trying to formulate this in a way that doesn't sound like I'm saying you're a problem or you're overweight but it's impossible! haha). Sit on the bike, swing on the saddle to simulate the effect of a bump and have someone ...


4

I have a piece of normal inner tube surrounding the U part of my U-lock and that does the trick. It is a bit longer than the actual plastic coated part of the 'U' and bunches up when I close the lock. I carry the lock on my bike rack or on my rucksack shoulder strap (it has a slot in it), depending on what bike I am on. With your lock bracket clamping to ...


4

Rather than use grease, you can try using a 'dry' or wax based chain lube. Apply the lube to the flat clips on each pedal - hit both sides if they are double sided mtb pedals. If you think the squeak may be coming from the pedal itself, rather than the friction between the pedal and the clip, apply some lube to the spindle attachment points where the pedal ...



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