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Germany: (I should explain that I'm mostly biking to get to/from work, so this is about urban streets. But when I ride for fun on weekends, on the relevant paths there's seldomly so much traffic it requires significant regulation.) If there's a street present, usually pedestrians are on the sidewalk and bikes on the street, so there's no conflict. If ...


1

Western Australia: It is a legal requirement here to have a bell or warning device fitted. I have bells on my bikes and generally only use them when approaching pedestrians or cyclists who are either making it difficult to pass (e.g., walking wide or in the centre of the path) or who I feel may make a sudden move that could prove not so good for either of ...


4

I've noticed over the years that if I call out it startles people walking. Most walkers don't expect someone on a bicycle let along someone calling out something they don't understand. So my strategy now is when I get reasonably close I cough. Yup cough, it is a familiar sound and if it's on a quite street the walker will usually turn around to see who's ...


4

I send a single "ping" with my bell. More pings only if I don't see the other person recognizing me (e.g. look at me, wave a hand, change direction etc).


3

Bristol, UK: "Passing on your left/right" usually works, but every once in a while peds (or even cyclists) will move the wrong way. To be on the safe side, I just bell from a good few yards back. If that doesn't provoke a shoulder check, I just roll up slowly and issue a polite "'Scuse me, mind if I pass?"... I think that's probably the best all-round ...


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In Dayton, OH, the protocol seems to be sneak up on them and shout as your tire starts to overlap. Majority of riders tend to not use bells (and only shout when it is too late) and a smaller slice have the miracle bell (miracle if the other person hears it). However, I have installed dual action bells on all our bikes (or a bugle on my sons) and it ...


4

From Southern California, when approaching slower traffic from behind on bike lanes and paths: "On your left" meaning that you are passing them on their left-hand side. Only left. People hear the "On" portion of the call and they start moving to their right. I can't ever recall hearing "On your right". Good thing, too. Would be a mess.


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I post an answer but looking for other answers and will not give the check to my answer. I live in Houston and the common protocol is bike left or bike right. Bike left is bike passing on the left. If the pedestrian does not know the protocol they will turn look to the left so things can go bad. If it looks like an experienced runner they probably know ...



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