Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

53

The simplest answer to your question is that 1) speeds have increased; but 2) speeds would have increased even more except Tour organizers have been consciously making the Tour harder in order to increase the drama, suspense, and entertainment value of the race. That makes comparisons of overall winner's speed quite complex when combined with normal ...


37

There are a few "pseudo-facts" I think might be at play in this graphic: You mentioned 10% of increase, say from 35km/h to 40km/h average speed. That is a VERY significant increase. Anyone well trained can sustain 35km/h average for some time even in a mountain bike, but FORTY km/h is MUCH HARDER to sustain, and that's because aerodynamic drag is ...


23

Most sources I've read suggest that your body can process at most 300 calories per hour during exercise. And a lot of sources suggest that you only attempt to replace roughly 200 calories per hour at best. You should be able to do this easily without any simple sugars. Your initial budget is much much larger than 1500 calories, you don't need to do a one for ...


21

There is an interesting Q&A on independent.co.uk (though it dates from 1995) talking about bananas and tennis... Q. Witnessing players at Wimbledon chomping their way through pounds of bananas between games prompts the question: who began this sporting food fad and are there sound nutritional reasons for the players' preference for ...


17

The Tour de France is primarily an endurance event, where team strategy is more important than outright speed. In addition there are UCI rules for racing bicycles. This includes a 6.8kg weight restriction that has been in place since 2000. If you want to compare outright speeds it would be more interesting to look at how the average speed of the time ...


16

I am not a bike expert, but a computer programmer. The problem with this question is that there is no control to compare it to. Each year the TDF changes. They visit different parts of Europe, yes it is not 100% in France. This means you can't compare times between years. Weather (not climate) is a concern. The temperature, wind and humidity will impact ...


15

What really struck me though was that the average speeds really haven't changed much The chart ranges from about 25km/h to over 40km/h, and that is a big change. As others have mentioned, increasing your average speed requires a non-linear increase in power applied to the pedals. In other words, to increase average speed from 25km/h to 26km/h is easier ...


14

The simplest advice is: just keep it up. Give your body time to adapt to the new workload you're putting on it, and it will get easier and easier. For drinks, you can buy gatorade powder and mix it yourself at home. $19.49 for 9 gallons of gatorade is way better than paying retail price for a quart at a time. As I understand carb loading, it's not ...


14

Advice in book Racing Weight by Matt Fitzgerald goes something like this, paraphrased: Yes, training without carbohydrates will train your body to use stored fat better. But your capacity to train will go down (not enough fuel!), and net result will be less improvement. It references this study, which compares two groups of athletes on hi-carb and low-carb ...


12

The EXPERIENCED CYCLIST, who is not, eg, out of shape after a long winter does not need any food for 50 road miles. This is because his muscles and liver have "learned" to store extra sugar/carbs to provide energy over a long period of time. But a beginning cyclist who is not, say, already a distance runner or otherwise used to exercising vigorously for ...


11

A few years ago I ran across a recipe that Team Garmin uses (or did at the time). It's boiled potatoes with a bit of olive oil and salt. If you wrap it up right it's easy to carry, unwrap and eat while riding. I'm not sure how many of these you could carry. I've tried it on medium rides (40 to 50 miles) and they were great. I can't find the text of the ...


11

Maltodextrin. It is basically pure glucose, which is the only sugar that your muscles can use directly without converting, so it's just pure energy. It also has no flavor or sweetness, so it is completely inoffensive, and you can sweeten (or not) to your desired level. Look in any sport beverage and it will contain maltodextrin. A lot of home brewing ...


10

This link "Quick note: Eating is the key to long distance biking" says, If you don't eat, you have an hour, maybe two, of energy stored up. Fortunately it's prescriptive too, saying, And what should these calories be? Well, something easy on your stomach and fairly light. There are special sporting-related products that are generally right ...


9

Entirely depends on the lenght of ride. If you're riding for less than 2 hours then your body already has everything on board that it needs. If you're working for more than 2 hours you should eat complex carbs (pasta, oatmeal) 2 hours before the ride so that they have time to digest before you actually need them. Also eating too much just before can limit ...


9

Informally, I find that on long rides, your body will simply know what it needs. You pull off at a stop; the trail mix and pickles look delicious, so you eat them. More scientifically though, your body can process about two servings (e.g., bottles of gatorade, gel packs, etc.) of carbohydrate per hour. Any more than this, and you can experience ...


8

I think that is question can at least be partially answered by whether or not you can tolerate food in your stomach. While having a big heavy meal would probably be bad, having something in there, plus doing some refueling along the ride will help you keep from bonking and also make sure you are not running on a deficit for the rest of your day. I find ...


8

Real food like bananas are better than processed food any day. Don't ditch old school foods. Remember when they said that magarine was better for you than butter? 30 years later, the find out trans-fats are bad. The banana stands the test of time. Gel packs and bars won't. Keep at it brother!


8

Last year I plotted average speed versus race distance and there's an incredibly accurate inverse relationship. http:///www.32sixteen.com/2011/07/25/correlation-does-not-equal-causality/ But to add to my chart and flesh out the reason I think it hasn't increased so greatly. The Tour is a stage race. The average speed we have presented is the average ...


8

Really, any source of food is fine for a 25–50 mile ride. Although for anything of longer distance, you're going to want to add significant quantities of carbohydrates. Nuts are great, but they're primarily fat and protein. Toss some M&Ms and raisins into that mix for an improvement, and make sure there's some salt in them. But really, 25–50 miles ...


8

A couple of potential quick fixes: Slow Down A Little If you cycle a bit slower (5-10%) you should find that takes a lot less out of you and it will only add a few minutes to your commute. Take The Bus One Day A Week If you exercise 5 days in a row you're going to feel tired, particularly on the 4th and 5th days. If you work Monday to Friday then try ...


7

50km isn't that enormous of a distance - and especially for someone who does 18km twice a day. It sounds like your current pace would have you completing that in about three hours. I'd bring a snack or two if you're worried about being peckish, but unless you're going all-out for a personal record or you skip breakfast you should have no issues. Just keep ...


7

The canonical recommendation is for "a complete and balanced diet". Whatever 'supplements' you might need depend on what your current diet is. The recommendations I've been given (I'm 50 and commute 24 miles/day) from a dietitian are vitamin D (because I live in Canada - I suspect that recommendation is obsolete currently while I'm commuting 2 hours/day in ...


7

I think the times you're posting for the distances you're riding, especially on a touring bike are pretty reasonable. Professional athletes, or racers, will ride quicker, but for an amateur aiming for a century your times are fine. On a longer ride, you need more time for rest stops and food and nature breaks. A road bike will make you a little quicker, ...


7

Unfortunately, I don't feel able to talk about food QUALITY, since even "vegan" can mean a lot of things these days, and this understanding varies from person to person. Just to illustrate, I'm not sure to suggest cheese, honey, milk and eggs, although I do find these to be excellent heavy-fuels for cycling. Now what I do feel sure to advise, being an ...


7

Yep: Keep doing it. When I commuted regularly (10 miles each way but with a 25 mile "shortcut" in the morning) I had more energy than I do now (though admittedly that's in part because of several medical problems). Get a decent amount of carbs, especially in the PM, somewhere between noon and 2 hours before you depart. Don't try to break any records, ...


7

Some personal thoughts/opinions: If you're not riding much longer than an hour or so, you might not need much. Perhaps a sports/electrolyte drink that contains sugars will suffice and be convenient. I use mainly cheap gel bars for a sugar hit, but they get quite boring and eat away at your teeth. Flapjack, oats, etc are good for a bit of variety but ...


6

One of the recommendations for heavily training athletes now is to drink a fair amount of carbohydrate within an hour of finishing, in order to replenish glycogen stores in your muscle cells. Furthermore, the uptake is better in the presence of protein, so there are 'after ride' drink mixes you can spend more hard-earned $$$ on. My substitute: chocolate ...


6

Chris's answer is good if you are planning for some serious training/ride. IMHO, if you ride just a few Kms there's not even need for a particular diet, as long as it's mixed and well balanced. I stick to such a regular diet for rides of 50 Km or less, otherwise some tuning (as described by Chris) is needed.


6

Granola/Power bars are cheap if you get the supermarket/Nature Valley ones, usually $10 for 32 double packs. Or you can make your own - lot of recipes on the net. Basically melt butter / sugar / honey and add anything oat / fruit / nut like, spread on a tray and put in fridge.


6

Personally for me, the key ingredient (after raw calories) is salt. I find on my Ironman distance races that I go hyponatremic pretty early. I just get salt packets from a restaurant and eat a packet (5 grams) every hour or so. When I realize I am low on salt (usually feel like I am falling asleep while biking hard or running) I eat some salt, and as ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible