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20

Passing a horse, mounted or otherwise, should be done so: very slowly as quiet as possible. If you have a loud freehub, pedal slowly -- do your best not to coast. with as much space & consideration as possible no sudden movements limit the number of cyclists going past It all depends on the horses' temperament. Some are OK, some like cars but not ...


18

Riding in snow depends on a bunch of factors, so you won't really ever be able to know unless you just go for it and try it out. What bike/wheels you have Should be obvious. Mountain vs Road, 26" vs 29", wide vs skinny tires, etc Your skill level in snow The better and more comfortable you are in the snow is important. I'd say its the most important ...


16

In german this is called "Hinterrad versetzen" -- "displacing the back wheel". I got to learn this in an mtb course I took a while back. If you can, try to find an instructor or other experienced rider to teach you. How to practice: Start very, very small and always wear full protective gear, i.e. a full-face helmet and vest in case you crash. You will ...


15

If you're looking for a general purpose bike for commuting and towpath riding, you probably want to avoid a standard road bike, they are very specialized and have very small tire clearance. Typically supporting tires no larger than 28mm and often lack mud guards or rack/pannier mounts. However, touring bikes or steel cyclocross bikes (if they have rack and ...


13

Officially: Bikes yield to hikers and horses. Hikers are fine, if you call it out and pass when safe. Horses can spook easily. Once you see it, stop. Wait for the rider to signal you by. Often I have been simply asked to walk my bike by. Easy. Sometimes it's best to just wait for them to pass. In your situation, I would get within 10 - 20 yards, and ...


11

You should find that on those bikes everything is a bit stronger and heavier than a standard touring bike. Not only are they expected to carry more weight, they're designed to be ridden into places where failures are more difficult to recover from. As well, because they're designed to be ridden off road they'll usually have a lower top tube for better ...


10

I slow down and address the rider in a conversational, even sing-song, tone "Good morning, rider. There are two bikes behind you. Is it Ok for us to pass?" (They almost always say "yes" and thank me/us for alerting them, but it also gives them the option to ask me to dismount or hold back). Note that despite your having addressed the rider, the ...


9

Yes. If you put slightly wider tires then you can do packed earth or even gravel without too much trouble. Even 25 or 28mm tires give a lot of advantage over 18 or 23mm wide tires. I did Col du Parpaillon on 25's. From my trip report: The hostel owner had said Col du Parpaillon was closed because of ice in the unlit tunnel at the top but we decided ...


9

Aside from n+1, the other honest answer is: as many as your spouse will tolerate. I have six (two road bikes, one mtb, two folders, one English cruiser). I have met the spousal tolerance factor. After this, I can only replace, not add. So if I really want that Brompton, one of the folders has to go. Now, your question doesn't also get to another important ...


8

My experience from last winter was that I could keep moving through falling sticky snow up to about 6" = 15cm but it took a great deal of effort, even more so if your tyres end up cracking through frozen puddles under the snow. There were sections where I had to pedal hard just to keep moving even down some normally fast downhill sections. It's great fun - ...


8

Inflate tires to optimal pressure Check Brakes Hold handlebars and kick/twist front wheel. - Makes sure headset and stem aren't loose. I think those are whats needed to make sure your bike is safe to ride. If anything else breaks while you are riding you should be able safely stop and deal with whatever situation arises. There are some more things you ...


8

If you have n bikes, n+1 bikes is the right amount of bikes to have. ;) Realistically, I think 2 or 3 is adequate - a cyclocross or non-racing road bike can do the first two tasks (road ride + commute) provided it has rack and fender mounts, and one mountain bike is likely good enough for the trails in one's area (if you go somewhere else where another ...


7

In general, the softer the ground, the bigger the tire should be. A fat tire will let you "float" over the surface instead of sinking in, like a snowshoe. If you're sinking, it takes tremendous effort to keep riding, and you can't really steer. Gravels vary widely. Coarse-edged crushed rock locks together to create a firm, traffic-bearing surface. ...


7

It's called an endo and you can start learning it anywhere right now (e.g in a parking lot). Don't try to learn turning endos or rolling endos at first. Here is a good how-to video (doesn't matter that it's on a bmx): ...


6

For the most extreme conditions he'd want something like the Pugsley. For less extreme conditions any "mountain" bike should work fine. In a way, the trailer is probably less critical than the bike. So long as the tires are large enough in diameter to not get caught in potholes, and so long as they are sufficiently wide to not sink into the soil (given ...


6

Whenever you pass a horse, whether walking the bike or rolling, make sure to stay well clear of the hind end. Horses spook easily and may instinctively kick if something approaches them from behind that they can't see or see very well. I'd suggest staying outside of 4 metres/yards behind, or 2 metres/yards to the side of any strange horse no matter how tame ...


6

I won't give my own question the check. I have a few bikes and I see a bike I want and I am going through the can I justify to myself. How many is too much? If you don't have room to store them safely and sheltered then too many. If you are not going to maintain them then it is too many. You can't afford it. When do you need more than one bike? ...


5

One thing to think about - before a long ride, don't make any major changes - don't adjust your seat height or angle, replace your stem, or anything like that. Nothing like trying to fix something kinda minor the night before a long ride, to find out you made it so much worse the next day.


5

I've never had a pair of MTB shoes that are waterproof though I wouldn't doubt if they exist. Even if they were you'd still have water coming of your shin and into the shoe (this is what makes even waterproof shoe covers a bit wet inside). I just tough it out. I have a set of neoprene shoe covers that keep my feet warm and maybe even dry depending on how ...


5

Ay Up lights I have two sets of these lights, one on my handlebars and one on my helmet. They are: Amazingly bright, I've never seen a brighter light Very light - even with the light and battery on my helmet it's not uncomfortably heavy Long lasting - The battery lasts 3-6 hours on a charge!! Incredibly rugged - There is a lifetime guarantee on the lights ...


5

This ultimately comes down to money, however there are plenty of other factors: Form factor - a bike light with a battery held onto the frame with velcro is a PITA to take off the bike and put back on, not what you want to be spending five minutes on whilst you pop into Tesco's for a pint (568ml) of milk. Beam focus - LED lights have came a long way but ...


5

No one has mentioned it here, but horse owners and llama-packers and mule riders have ALL commented to me : PLEASE STAY BELOW THE ANIMAL AT ALL TIMES WHEN YIELDING OR OVERTAKING. These animals get more spooked by threats from above, (where the threat looks larger or looks like they can pounce) then from below (where the threat seems much smaller).


5

There are many horses in the area where I live. I often encounter horses on the trails, and I've had occasion to talk to the riders about proper procedure. Accumulated advice (so far): Talk to the horse as you're passing. "Hi horsey! Aren't you a pretty horsey?" -- that type of goofy talk. It's (allegedly) calming and lets the horse know that you're human. ...


4

All jackets have to do two jobs: Stop the water (rain) getting in. Let the water (sweat) get out. While being easy to transport when not in use. £70 is unlikely to buy you a jacket that works well doing both if you pay full price. I would look out for a Paclite in a sale, as they are light and take up very little space on wqhen not in use. However ...


4

Has the tyre perished? Perhaps, it's just an inner tube that needs replacing. Take the tyre to your local bike shop and I'm sure they'll be able to suggest a suitable alternative. I'd ask for a plain road tyre, something pretty standard should do, just as long as it's the correct size. You don't need nobbly or off-road tyres unless you're trying to get over ...


4

So far most of what have been suggested are handtools... some planning and design tools are important as well. Get a copy of the International Mountain Biking Association's book, "Trail Solutions: IMBA's Guide to Building Sweet Singletrack." Find it here: http://www.imba.com/catalog/book-trail-solutions I spent the last three winters designing and ...


4

Comfortable is very subjective. I hate to use a car metaphor, but someone in a trike might find it more like steering a station wagon than a bike when it comes to tight turning. So in one concern, you're replaced an uncomfortable upright posture with a possibly stressful steering style. I would search for recumbent videos and see how many you can find that ...


4

When the horses are being ridden on the road, then I'd overtake them like I would do when driving: with plenty of space, not too much fuss, and slow enough to stop easily.


4

My only bike is a road bike which has 25mm tyres(Schwalbe Marathon at the back and Armadillo front). I expect that it would be fine on a tow path or most prepared tracks. I used mine a few weeks ago on a flat and rather muddy offroad track through the woods and fields. I was towing my son on a tag along. I got round, but I did have to get off and push ...



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