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13

If all else fails, refer to the instructions... Incredibly, Surly have an online guide for how to remove the decals: http://www.surlybikes.com/blog/spew/3_-_single-speed_drivetrains/ We do not apply a clear coat over our decals. Except for one brief period a long time ago, we never have. Yeah, your frame’s decals can get scuffed up. But we have never ...


12

A few tips: Painters don't know anything about bikes. If the paint shop is not specifically a bicycle paint shop, they may still offer to strip your bike of components for you. Don't let this happen! Most painters are unfamiliar with the intricacies of bicycle mechanics, and may improperly remove or damage some components, or not know or have the tools to ...


10

You might want to talk to a motorcycle shop that does paint. They are most likely setup to do smaller parts with lots of details. They would be more familiar with masking threaded holes and bearing surfaces.


9

I put in a lot of effort painting a bike as you describe, i.e. properly given non-specialist materials and lots of elbow grease. However, for the effort, I do think it is worth removing the bottom bracket and headset cups. (Or getting someone to remove them for you.) I was traumatized when my freshly painted-in-yellow bike fell over for the top tube to ...


8

The braking surface on your rims shouldn't be painted, it will just reduce the brake's effectiveness and the paint will quickly wear out. In fact, over time rim brakes will actually wear down the metal on the braking surface. (After a lot of use, this area can get dangerously thin and the rims will need to be replaced.) Painting below the braking surface ...


8

The first thing is to note that vibrant, brightly-colored objects are by nature more attention-getting, so I hope your bike is not bright red, light orange, yellow or bright green. I have noted that gray bikes are less noticeable and even hard to see in some conditions. Dark blue, dark gray, pale or dusty white, and brown are also favorable colors to make a ...


8

It's almost certainly stickered if it's a cheap bike, plus laser etching is usually reserved for bare metal frames - Titanium in particular. Cheap or not, it's still probably got a clear coat over it, and that sticker is almost certainly underneath the clear coat. Unless you're prepared to strip it down to raw metal, prime it, and paint it, you're probably ...


7

I think @freiheit already said it: paint the outside of the outer links! If you ride single/fixed, this part of the links never touch anything else, so the paint does not wear out neither damage other working parts. I would do it degreasing the chain very well (boiling with soap in the end, perhaps) and then using a hard foam paint roller, with the chain ...


7

The same way you would for any paint: find a swatch that matches it, or chip a bit off the bike, and then take it to a paint store and ask them to match it for you. If it's a modern bike of a decent manufacturer you could always drop them an email, and they might be able to give you the make and model of the actual paint they use. Also remember you will ...


7

If you're going to use paint, I have had some success with the following: Bead-blast (or sandblast) the old-paint completely off the frame. Sandpaper just isn't as good. You can rent a bead-blaster. Clean thoroughly with ethanol and rags. A white rag should stay clean if you rub it on the frame by the time you're done. Prepare a clean environment for ...


7

My trick is to find nail polish that roughly matches the finish. It's easy to apply, quick to dry, and will prevent rust and oxidation for quite a while. It's not a perfect finish match, but there are quite a lot of colors that come close. If you can't find an near-perfect match try mixing two or three colors. Just remember the basics; with few exceptions ...


7

Using car wax on your frame could certainly help protect it over time, though storing it indoors is much more important so that all of the components are protected from the weather. There are bike specific products like Pedro's Bike Lust but if you don't want to go that direction you should be just fine with any auto wax. In the past I have heard of people ...


6

The manufacturer recommends this product for protecting a painted surface and not used on bare metal. Lacquer by its nature (at least the types still available in the U.S.) provides a beautiful finish but not very good at chip resistance. It is typically applied in multiple layers with sanding between coats. Take this to mean very time consuming and tedious. ...


6

I use 3M Adhesive Remover. It has gotten off all my stickers and duct tape, even some very tough [stuff] that I thought was a lost cause, and has not hurt any of my paint jobs, even some pretty ghetto paint I have used. I got mine at Walmart, but I'm sure any hardware store will have it. Make sure to test it on a small area that is not too visible, like the ...


6

If the bike was inexpensive it is likely a sticker. Can you feel an edge with your finger nail? You can try to warm the adhesive with a hairdryer and gently peel the sticker off. If the glue residue won't come off try alcohol or GOOF OFF a chemical made for that purpose. Try the chemicals on a small area that is likely to get scratched anyway (like the rear ...


6

I have extensive experience painting metal. Here are my rules of thumb. Rough up the metal, lots of nooks and crannies ensure the primer will stick. Sanding or sandblasting is the best way to do this. As pointed out in the comments, aluminium should be roughed up "nicely" :) Clean the surface with some type of alcohol after you're done sanding. After ...


5

No, 400F will not affect frame integrity.


5

Chromoly can rust. Aluminum usually doesn't unless you're riding in the ocean. Cheapest fix is probably some automotive touch-up paint; sand / clean the area (scuff the surrounding paint up a little), apply a coat, wet sand, repeat. Won't be perfect but it'll protect the underlying metal from rusting. Of course, if you want that perfect "unblemished" look ...


5

You'll definitely need to remove all components. For threaded bits you have two choices - leave junk bolts in there that will get powdercoated over and then carefully remove them (leaving a bit of an edge around the bolt hole) or let them get masked but almost certainly somewhat powdercoated into and use a tap and die set to chase them before reassembly. ...


5

Let's create something of a (price) ordered list: It all depends on what kind of look you are hoping to achieve. I would suggest if the bike is a neutral color like yours, you try to find a detail color from, say, a decal, and replicate that in various places over the bike by hunting down the parts that match. This process is an endless rabbit hole, after ...


5

If you feel the bike has no significant resale value, then why not just do what would produce the results YOU would like the most? But if you really want to preserve the stickers, but want to avoid the trouble and less than ideal paint job due to masking them, I'm guessing it would be possible to photograph (and PhotoShop) them (or find matching images on ...


5

Really deep dents or cracks are a cause for concern, but not little dimples and such. Also, the "work hardening" of aluminum is considerably less than industry types would make out....I've worked on numbers of aluminum frames that are at least 20 years old with no sign whatever of any structural problems. Kind of depends what you're doing. The average ...


5

Aluminium frames do not corrode, no need to worry. My 2006 mountain bike frame has lots of scratches and defects, but it is still stiff enough. Aluminium frames have shorter life expetency than steel frames had, because aluminium has a tendency to tire, but it can be used without worries for 10 years. If you are really worried, put a sticker over it :)


5

I use helicopter tape. You can find it on Amazon or from most any race car supply shop. It's a little pricey but well worth it. It's very sticky and thick enough to absorb impacts from rocks. I use it on the bottom side of my downtube, on the drive side chain stay, and anywhere a cable is close to the frame.


5

I did it in what I consider a "perfect" way: sticking LOTS of reflective stickers (home made) covering every logo on the bike. Of course it is just a part of the uglification program (others include never washing the paintjob, and strapping any new stuff on the bike with duct tape, tube rubber strips or bread bag ties). It works three ways: The logos get ...


5

Commercial paint jobs often use heat-baked enamel, with multiple coats (not just undercoat and topcoat), and finished with a clear top coat. The baking process produces a really tough, well bonded coating, and the clear topcoat (as well as being tough) produces a nice finish that hides scratches.


5

Since OP said the bike was Aluminum, we should note some things: Painting aluminum almost always goes wrong when done at home. Upon sanding, often sand particles are embedded in the aluminum (sand blasting likely doesn't help). Chemicals are the way to go for stripping aluminum frames. You need a different type of primer (etching primers specifically ...


5

It depends on the type of adhesive. Sometimes it can be just pulled off. Sometimes the gentle heat of a hairdryer (not a heat gun) can weaken an adhesive and make it easier to remove. Or you can try the use of GooGone or similar adhesive thinner/solvent (try on an inconspicuous place first to make sure it won't damage the finish). Heat and solvent cover ...



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