Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

In general panniers are more comfortable and efficient than carrying weight on your body. There are some things to be aware of, however. Safety. Every time you set off, make absolutely sure that all the pannier straps are done up. Apart from things falling out, the last thing you want is a loose strap getting caught in the spokes. This can wreak a wheel, ...


17

A messenger bag is great when you: Are not transporting a heavy load Have to put items into the bag, or remove items from the bag very often. Are doing short trips, or having to leave your bike a lot as part of a longer trip A rucksack is great when you: Wish to be able to easily carry the load while off the bike You have to walk a long way after your ...


17

Messenger bags still get your back sweaty, sometimes even moreso than a backpack since messenger bags are often wider than a backpack. I find a messenger bag more convenient than a backpack for shorter trips, but a pannier better for rides of greater than a mile or two. A messenger bag is quite handy if you have to make a lot of stops and don't have a lot to ...


11

I know it sounds too simple, but these bags are made to be cleaned (assuming yours is unlined. If it's lined, you'll never get it out). First, try dish soap and water. Citrus scents seem to cut the smell best, but that may be a personal preference. If that is not enough, then the next best option is to use a diluted solution of something like Pine Sol or ...


10

I do the supermarket run every week by bicycle - have done for about 7 years Family of four so I more or less fill a full size shopping trolley every time. This is made possible by a Christiana Trailer which is pretty much equivalent in load capacity to a shopping trolley: I have a bike that is now dedicated to the role of towing this beastie (for the ...


10

Since the weight will be the same, you won't even notice the change in terms of climbing. You will notice that your back will ache less and be less sweaty. Depending on your bike, it may even balance better with the weight lower to the ground. Biking up a hill with a few extra pounds won't make much of a difference; you only really notice a difference in ...


9

We can generalize the main areas where one can load weight as such: Front rack vs. Rear Rack High (on top of rack) vs. Low (in panniers) The most commonly accepted points for load distribution are as follows: Keep dense, heavy items low to the ground. The lower you & your bike's center of gravity is, the more easily you can keep yourself upright. ...


9

You have a few options here. You can get a two-legged kickstand. These are primarily used with heavy touring loads, but they will help stabilize the bike when parking with an uneven load. The two legs fold up into each other when you disengage the kickstand. You generally cut these with a hacksaw to shorten them to the appropriate length. I used one for a ...


8

I assuming you are going to put some washers on the inside of the bug so the bolt/net holds well. I would expect silicone sealant under the washers (on the inside of the bug) and the clips combined with a rubber washers between the head of the bolts and clip and the inside washer and net would do the job. End of bolt Rubber Washer Pannier clip Silicone ...


8

Yes. I own a north st bags convertible pannier and think it works great. It hangs a bit low, so don't try and use it on low rider racks. http://northstbags.com/products/woodward Also see Richard Jones Convertible Backpack http://www.convertiblebackpacks.us/ Also try WOHO bags "NINJA NINJA" convertible backpack: ...


8

'Bulk' is mostly about whether all of your luggage will fit in your bags. ie is the volume of your luggage less than the capacity of your bags. So it depends on how much stuff you want to take, and how big your panniers are. Aerodynamics doesn't really matter for touring. Unless you are cycling rather fast, or it is very windy. Usually the weight of your ...


7

Another cargo solution is a messenger bag or backpack strapped to a porteur rack or in a front basket. You have all the flexibility of a human-designed bag plus the ability to easily carry large/bulky loads when needed. Many bicycles handle quite well with even a moderate front load, but the lower the load can sit the better.


7

You should look into getting a folding double kickstand. They're great for loaded bikes. Both legs fold off to the left side, but when you kick it down one leg supports each side so the bike stays perfectly upright.


7

I would recommend getting a second bike for commuting. The Specialized Roubaix is a racing machine. It would also be foolish to leave it locked outside a shop (in case you considered doing that). Most likely you will void the warranty by using clamps on seat stays. To get that low weight, carbon frames are strong only in certain directions and may be ...


6

You might consider: Arkel Bug, which works as a backpack. Quite modern, sporty look. Ortlieb Downtown, which has a comfortable shoulder strap. You might check other products of those two producers, if you need a bigger/smaller cargo capacity. Both of these panniers are very easy to attach to your bike. Perfect for your daily commuting needs and running ...


6

Generally I think people use "pannier" to refer to just one bag on a rack of the bike. It can be on either the rear or front rack. If there is a set of two or more bags, panniers is used to refer to the whole set, but again, one bag on its own is just a pannier, regardless of whether it's a part of a set. There are other types of bags (not hung on racks) ...


6

In English, panniers originally referred to bags slung across the back of an animal (such as a horse), such that the weight hung down on either side of the animal. This keeps the weight lower so that the animal won't be as off-balance, and distributes the weight evenly. On a bicycle, the term is used for containers that resemble that, even if it's only on ...


6

You could always get a laptop sleeve and slide that into a big enough pannier. Timbuk2 has a couple pannier options that both have an included laptop sleeve and are designed to be easily carried off the bike. One converts to a messenger bag, the other more of a "shoulder bag". Looks like Timbuk2 has some of their stuff sold retail in the UK, and they also ...


6

A pannier is the best way to carry weight on a bike. It keeps the center of gravity low. While a few people prefer backpacks, most will find a pannier (or two, to keep things balanced) makes for an easier ride (uphill, downhill, or on the level), though at the expense of eliminating that sexy wet spot on the back of your shirt. You can also use a rack-top ...


6

I commuted for years carrying just one pannier. In fact, I have a pair of mismatched panniers because I wore out one of each original pair. If you just have clothes and incidentals in the bag, one pannier is certainly sufficient -- you will barely notice the slight off-balance. Definitely worry about heel spacing. Figure out how to get the bags as far ...


6

I've been commuting by bicycle even since I learnt to ride as a kid, and I've never commuted in any other way. I'd like to add one aspect that nobody has mentioned yet: be wary of theft. If you stand at a traffic light in a busy city, and have a visible laptop-bag in a pannier at the rear, it can be all-to-easy for someone to grab it and ride away with ...


6

That particular bike looks like it has mounting points for a rear rack, which is the primary issue. In general, what you are looking for are the bolt holes or "braze-ons" usually just a few inches below where the seat stays connect to the seat tube, as well as ones above the rear axle on the dropout. If your bike doesn't have them, there are ways to mount a ...


5

I have the same bike, and have done a little loaded touring (though not recently, as my health no longer permits it). I find that keeping the load low and balanced is the key. On the front it's important that the load be tightly attached, since if it is loose at all it will tend to wobble and resonate and can make the bike unmanageable on a rough surface. ...


5

Another option is a handlebar bag. Most models have a quick-release and shoulder strap so they're easier to take with you than a pannier. Mine is large enough to carry an iPad/netbook plus lunch, sunglasses and other small items. As long as your load isn't too heavy the effect on your steering is minimal. Otherwise I'd go with panniers or a rack-top bag. ...


5

I also hate leaving my rack on my bike carrying a back pack. One solution that I have been thinking about is to get a trailer. Most trailers can be attached in about 2 seconds so it is fast, keeps the weight off your back, etc. Update: Bought a trailer. Love it. Highly recommended. Have a Bob trailer. Was as much as my bike but easily worth it. ...


5

I've personally never seen or heard of a waterproof spray that will protect against soaking. Water hitting the material might run off fairly well, but a continuous rain soaks it so much that water will just seep through. That might not be a problem for commuting, but I'm assuming that if you're going through the extra step of double water-proofing, you're ...


5

If you want to carry a full-sized hiking backpack, your best option might be securing it into a BOB-type trailer. A big backpack would be hard to mount to one side of a bicycling without doing terrible things to weight distribution. I have a 25L Timbuk2 Especial Viaje backpack/pannier for commuting, and it works well for that but is already pretty heavy on ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible