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13

I just used a 5mm bolt with locking nut, and a ~15mm wide washer on the inside when this happened to my Ortleib. If you use stainless steel bolt, nut and washers it won't rust and the pressure against the pannier materials stops it leaking. I'd use the biggest washer you can find on the inside, but the biggest I could find was only 15mm. If you look at the ...


8

The safest way to carry luggage on a carbon frame is to use a trailer, like the BOB trailers. Carbon frames are very strong, but each area of the frame is designed and tested for the loads it expects from a given direction. Adding luggage to a frame not designed for it, i.e. Without braze-one or threaded mounts, is generally a bad idea.


5

Starting this year I have been front loading two panniers on my commuter, with a reasonably large load (laptop, papers and project books, clothing (work and change) and food). For what I have learned is that there isn't a single answer to how large you can go and depends on a number of factors: Q1: Pannier Size I actually run rear panniers (and/or a ...


5

I use two different strategies for the short and long absences. visiting a city by foot When I'll be away from the bike for a long time I take the valuable stuff (cash, id, small tool kit, phone, charger, camera) and leave everything else. If I'm in a formal camping area or in a secluded location I'll leave the tent pitched and my sleeping bag and ...


5

After some thought, your only options are 1) Backpack - hot and sweaty, not particularly large and affects your posture. I've ridden with a tramping (hiking) pack to move my toolkit about, and its not ideal. A smaller day pack would work better, or even a hydration pack if your load is smallish. Some people like sling-style messenger bags. 2) A fanny ...


4

I doubt you will find any way of making the bike secure enough to leave alone for hours on end. Perhaps you could somehow fit solid motorbike panniers, but they would be awfully heavy and inconvenient when you do have to remove them. When buying groceries you basically have the choice of taking the bags with you or leaving them on the bike. What I do ...


4

Most people have their single pannier on the left side for balance reasons because they are using single-leg kick-stands, which usually mount on the non-drive-side. I have a double-leg kickstand so it doesn't matter which side I mount the pannier -- at least for balance reasons. So I mount it on the right (drive) side. The reason I do this is because ...


3

When you have to worry is when turning. I suggest if you've got the rack already but can't test-fit the bags then you mock something up of the same size and do some tight turns on a nearby quiet road. Obviously you'll have to make a best guess as to the mounting points but you can probably scale from a picture of the mounting face. Ground clearance might be ...


3

Since you are already replacing spokes, the easiest way to find out is take a broken spoke from each side of the wheel and measure it. There are no hidden differences, you only need to match the length, thickness and type of spoke head. Note that spokes may be thinner at the center than ends, this is called butting.


3

Bang for buck would suggest an aluminum rack, but these typically don't support high loads. Once you start heading into the 20-30+ kg range steel performs better in terms of total load capacity and behavior under load (I.e., less flex which reduces the chance of a shimmy). In terms of steel I have had good luck with Tubus and hear good things about Surly ...


2

A company called Pacsafe makes a steel mesh web/net that fits around a backpack and can be used to lock it down. You might find a shape that works for your stuff. It's more of a deterrent than a guarantee but it's a worthy solution. Here is a link with a good picture. http://m.rei.com/product/709207/pacsafe-55-security-web-small


2

Cut two squares out of an old tube about 1" in size, place them on the inside and outside and use a rivet gun to insert a new rivet. If the tears seems large enough to have the new rivet pull right though you could also use bolts and washers in its place if you don't mind how it looks. But you should be able to get a very near if not water proof seal with ...


1

You might want to look into convertible backpack panniers. Mine is a little small by your standards but comes in a bigger version. It's cheap and not hard wearing so I wouldn't recommend it, but when I was looking there were proper bike luggage brands selling comparable bags with better mounting hardware.


1

There are some racks that mount directly onto the seat tube and utilise a quick release clamp; they only take a small load tho. This would avoid clamping onto the carbon. As others have hinted its not such a hot idea to do this as carbon is not designed for that kind of compression. You can find evidence of this with car racks where carbon frames are not ...


1

Most bags (that I've seen) don't reach past the diameter of the front wheel when they are mounted on the rack – I really don't think there will be a significant practical issue regarding the size of the bag. I've ridden, a lot, with both Kirtland and Ortlieb Rear Roller panniers on a variety of front racks – both conventional and low rider style. Mostly it ...


1

I think you'll find that a rack that fits a 29er is meant to clear a relatively large tire. So you're likely to have room. If you wanted to get a better idea you might be able to ask to measure the rack at your LBS or see if there are specs on Axiom's web site. Or you could ask on Amazon. The number you're interested in is the distance from the lowest ...


1

I put blinkies on my panniers (there's a little strap thing on them for that purpose), so if I'm only running one, I put it on the left partly so that the blinky blinks at traffic.


1

You could change out the carbon seat post for an alloy seat post, to negate the issues of clamping on carbon and use a beam rack + bag such as a Topeak RX Beam Rack with various compatible Topeak bags.


1

I've tried numerous setups over the years and am usually out on the road several times a week, weather permitting. I currently use Caradice Super C panniers in combination with Vanguard soft cases. I remove the Vanguard cases individually from the panniers to access my equipment. I carry multiple Canon bodies (7D II and 5D III), a 100-400mm zoom, a 100mm ...


1

I have various bikes (recumbents and foldable bikes). One of my 'bents uses 4 panniers (2 under seat and 2 on rear rack) 25-30 kg total, another 'bent uses a set of twin under seat banana style bags rated at 75 liter plus a rear rack bag, it too averages around 25-30 kg when touring. The foldables I ride with can use 4 panniers or I can use a BOB ...



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