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5

Starting this year I have been front loading two panniers on my commuter, with a reasonably large load (laptop, papers and project books, clothing (work and change) and food). For what I have learned is that there isn't a single answer to how large you can go and depends on a number of factors: Q1: Pannier Size I actually run rear panniers (and/or a ...


5

I use two different strategies for the short and long absences. visiting a city by foot When I'll be away from the bike for a long time I take the valuable stuff (cash, id, small tool kit, phone, charger, camera) and leave everything else. If I'm in a formal camping area or in a secluded location I'll leave the tent pitched and my sleeping bag and ...


4

I'd go with a couple of bungee cords, maybe the adjustable-length ones. That's probably going to be more versatile and adaptable than something more specialized. There are some flat adjustable bungees, like these: http://www.amazon.com/ROK-Straps-Adjustable-Loop-Thru-BLACK/dp/B008ETMV8I That particular type is attached on either side such that you can ...


4

Most people have their single pannier on the left side for balance reasons because they are using single-leg kick-stands, which usually mount on the non-drive-side. I have a double-leg kickstand so it doesn't matter which side I mount the pannier -- at least for balance reasons. So I mount it on the right (drive) side. The reason I do this is because ...


4

I doubt you will find any way of making the bike secure enough to leave alone for hours on end. Perhaps you could somehow fit solid motorbike panniers, but they would be awfully heavy and inconvenient when you do have to remove them. When buying groceries you basically have the choice of taking the bags with you or leaving them on the bike. What I do ...


3

If you rolled it to the front it would not look like that picture. Yes you roll it to the back. I have some Front Roller - not making this up.


3

When you have to worry is when turning. I suggest if you've got the rack already but can't test-fit the bags then you mock something up of the same size and do some tight turns on a nearby quiet road. Obviously you'll have to make a best guess as to the mounting points but you can probably scale from a picture of the mounting face. Ground clearance might be ...


3

Bang for buck would suggest an aluminum rack, but these typically don't support high loads. Once you start heading into the 20-30+ kg range steel performs better in terms of total load capacity and behavior under load (I.e., less flex which reduces the chance of a shimmy). In terms of steel I have had good luck with Tubus and hear good things about Surly ...


2

I have the exact same setup: On the end of the bag, I clipped it to the panniers using the built-in clips, as you're doing, but I would not trust this to keep the bag stationary. I just bought one of those big containers of bungee cords of different lengths from Canadian Tire, and used the two shortest ones to go around the bag's middle. It looks like I ...


2

Tenba, Ape, Timbuktu and a number of other camera bag manufacturers' sell the inserts used in their bags separately. Do a search on Amazon for 'camera bag insert'. These fit well inside Ortlieb Office Panniers. However, most of these inserts are limited to carrying a standard DSLR without a vertical battery grip. Like other water-resistant panniers, it takes ...


2

A company called Pacsafe makes a steel mesh web/net that fits around a backpack and can be used to lock it down. You might find a shape that works for your stuff. It's more of a deterrent than a guarantee but it's a worthy solution. Here is a link with a good picture. http://m.rei.com/product/709207/pacsafe-55-security-web-small


1

Unless it is touring bike with a long chain stay you actually have more pedal clearance up front. Have you looked at like the Ortleib office?


1

Most bags (that I've seen) don't reach past the diameter of the front wheel when they are mounted on the rack – I really don't think there will be a significant practical issue regarding the size of the bag. I've ridden, a lot, with both Kirtland and Ortlieb Rear Roller panniers on a variety of front racks – both conventional and low rider style. Mostly it ...


1

I think you'll find that a rack that fits a 29er is meant to clear a relatively large tire. So you're likely to have room. If you wanted to get a better idea you might be able to ask to measure the rack at your LBS or see if there are specs on Axiom's web site. Or you could ask on Amazon. The number you're interested in is the distance from the lowest ...


1

I put blinkies on my panniers (there's a little strap thing on them for that purpose), so if I'm only running one, I put it on the left partly so that the blinky blinks at traffic.


1

I have various bikes (recumbents and foldable bikes). One of my 'bents uses 4 panniers (2 under seat and 2 on rear rack) 25-30 kg total, another 'bent uses a set of twin under seat banana style bags rated at 75 liter plus a rear rack bag, it too averages around 25-30 kg when touring. The foldables I ride with can use 4 panniers or I can use a BOB ...


1

I recommend two bags. First, use a handlebar bag for your photographic gear. You can either use the foam inserts as suggested above or I believe there are some dedicated camera bags for the front of your bike. This gives you easy access to your camera but it also ensures that your camera equipment is securely held. For your laptop, etc. I recommend a ...



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