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20

In general panniers are more comfortable and efficient than carrying weight on your body. There are some things to be aware of, however. Safety. Every time you set off, make absolutely sure that all the pannier straps are done up. Apart from things falling out, the last thing you want is a loose strap getting caught in the spokes. This can wreak a wheel, ...


6

I've been commuting by bicycle even since I learnt to ride as a kid, and I've never commuted in any other way. I'd like to add one aspect that nobody has mentioned yet: be wary of theft. If you stand at a traffic light in a busy city, and have a visible laptop-bag in a pannier at the rear, it can be all-to-easy for someone to grab it and ride away with ...


6

I would recommend getting a second bike for commuting. The Specialized Roubaix is a racing machine. It would also be foolish to leave it locked outside a shop (in case you considered doing that). Most likely you will void the warranty by using clamps on seat stays. To get that low weight, carbon frames are strong only in certain directions and may be ...


5

That particular bike looks like it has mounting points for a rear rack, which is the primary issue. In general, what you are looking for are the bolt holes or "braze-ons" usually just a few inches below where the seat stays connect to the seat tube, as well as ones above the rear axle on the dropout. If your bike doesn't have them, there are ways to mount a ...


5

I commuted for years carrying just one pannier. In fact, I have a pair of mismatched panniers because I wore out one of each original pair. If you just have clothes and incidentals in the bag, one pannier is certainly sufficient -- you will barely notice the slight off-balance. Definitely worry about heel spacing. Figure out how to get the bags as far ...


5

If you want to carry a full-sized hiking backpack, your best option might be securing it into a BOB-type trailer. A big backpack would be hard to mount to one side of a bicycling without doing terrible things to weight distribution. I have a 25L Timbuk2 Especial Viaje backpack/pannier for commuting, and it works well for that but is already pretty heavy on ...


5

Yes. I own a north st bags convertible pannier and think it works great. It hangs a bit low, so don't try and use it on low rider racks. http://northstbags.com/products/woodward Also see Richard Jones Convertible Backpack http://www.convertiblebackpacks.us/ Also try WOHO bags "NINJA NINJA" convertible backpack: ...


4

Another option is to modify a rack so you can attach a backpack to it. I've seen this done, but unfortunately we didn't have a common language to discuss how well it worked. This guy had built the whole rack himself so it included a stand as well as the pack. This is how I would approach your problem, simply because panniers are all smaller than even a ...


3

One thing that surprised me about using panniers to commute was that the inside of the panniers had an influence on the stuff that I put in them. In particular, my panniers (JandD) partially expose the back sides of some of the mounting clips inside the bags themselves. I found that this exposed hardware scratched up my laptop one day; it could similarly ...


3

Short answer based on the little information given I'd guess two larger panniers would be enough, especially if the tent and sleeping mat is strapped on top. Watch out for the heel clearance, especially with the largest ones. Long answer and rambling: The length of the trip doesn't matter as much as you'd might think. It really depends on how much you'll ...


3

Be careful, you might have problems with your rear disk brake caliper interfering with rack. You might need a special rack made for this situation. Some bike models have brakes mounted between seat stay and chain stay (inside rear triangle) and can use most racks. See also this post: Rack (+ Pannier) for a bike with disc brakes


2

I found a picture of how I did this! You can see the firmer, black foam with foil that I used on the outside, and the bits of softer foam that I used to pack everything in. The flap poking up covers the top when the pannier is closed. This photo is from when I was putting it together, so the contents is not well arranged. I make a simple frame so I could ...


2

Something to take care of is the increase in influence from side winds, and a small increase in aerodynamic drag. I used to bike in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, which is often a bit windy, and you can immediately feel the difference riding with and without panniers. However the net effect from side wind can be overall positive; as with sail-boat, ...


2

If I don't have much on a given day, should I just use one pannier or try to distribute between two? In general, how important is it to keep them balanced? If it's not heavy then it's not important, assuming it's close the wheel (so not much torque). I expect it's easier than a top-heavy back-pack. When I have more weight, how much will it change ...


2

While I am not familiar with your bike or its front fork. I would think a front pannier rack like this may work. http://www.zefal.com/en/racks/118-raider-front.html Please note that weight on the front fork makes the bike even easier to fall over. Please be very careful when the baby is on the back. I am not a fan of rear baby seats and would just buy a ...


1

I rode with a nice Arkel pannier during my first year of bike commuting, but attaching and removing became tedious. Now, I have two rear-mount Wald folding basket panniers. I use a large messenger backpack for my daily commute that slides easily in and out one of the baskets. Likewise, my reusable grocery bags become my panniers when shopping. They may ...


1

Such a thing does exist and it's the best! I own an Arkel Sherpack and Randonneur rack. The rack is great because I don't have any mounting points on my frame for traditional panniers. The rack hold very tight. I have commuted with two hefty laptops, lunch, and a change of clothes on it. I've been doing that kind of thing for well over a year. Everything has ...


1

I carry a 5D to and from work in a pannier reasonably regularly. I always take the lens off, an put it in a hard case with good foam inserts, and then it's usually packed in with my clothes etc. I wouldn't go mountain biking like this, but for road commuting I haven't had any problems with it. When I take larger camera gear with me - video cameras and ...


1

Edit - an alternative After reading something over the weekend, how about a trailer. This has the advantage that when you stop you can have all the gear in whatever bags you would like, as well as keeping the weight low and stable, and having room for tripods etc. Original I haven't been able to find anything suitable, though with the added requirement ...


1

If your front wheel is lifting off the ground, then I'd suggest keeping the weight forward as much as possible. Front panniers are the way to go if you can do it. As you say, it spreads the load. In fact I often feel better with panniers front and rear than with either on their own. We use "low-rider" front panniers on the tandem and often have our 10kg ...


1

I've ridden "fully loaded", with substantial load in the front panniers. It does affect your steering, but you get used to it after a relatively short time. (And when you take the bags off the front the bike feels like a sports car!) It does require a little more muscle to steer, but in a way steering is actually more stable. You do need to be careful of ...


1

I have ridden with children about that weight on the back, there is no way I would consider adding more weight to the rear of the bike. If you worry about the effect on steering of front paniers, I can only presume you have experience riding uni-cycles if you are considering adding rear paniers. An option to consider would be panniers on the rear and a ...


1

You want two large-ish (30-40 litres each) paniers in the back, and two small-ish (20-25 litres each) paniers in the front. Having them on both ends of the bike improves handling a lot, and it lessens the pressure on your rear tire, which can save you quite a few flats. I have two Ortlieb back roller classic paniers in the back, and two front roller classic ...


1

It can be all over the map, from a backpack containing a sleep sack and a credit card to a trailer hauling everything including the kitchen sink (a fold-up one). I recall one guy who did a week-long trip with only a sleeping bag, a "bivy sack", and a pair of tennis shoes bungied to his rear rack. I'd suggest you first study what racks can be attached to ...


1

I have attached many things to my bike. Alas I only have a few sample pictures, to help illustrate everything I have learned so far: fig1. This is a trailer I made: fig2. These are some alternate Tesco boxes: fig3. This is how I improvised with tape to attach wood and metal onto the rack: fig4. This is an improvised basket after the standard ...



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