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21

In general panniers are more comfortable and efficient than carrying weight on your body. There are some things to be aware of, however. Safety. Every time you set off, make absolutely sure that all the pannier straps are done up. Apart from things falling out, the last thing you want is a loose strap getting caught in the spokes. This can wreak a wheel, ...


7

I would recommend getting a second bike for commuting. The Specialized Roubaix is a racing machine. It would also be foolish to leave it locked outside a shop (in case you considered doing that). Most likely you will void the warranty by using clamps on seat stays. To get that low weight, carbon frames are strong only in certain directions and may be ...


7

Yes. I own a north st bags convertible pannier and think it works great. It hangs a bit low, so don't try and use it on low rider racks. http://northstbags.com/products/woodward Also see Richard Jones Convertible Backpack http://www.convertiblebackpacks.us/ Also try WOHO bags "NINJA NINJA" convertible backpack: ...


7

'Bulk' is mostly about whether all of your luggage will fit in your bags. ie is the volume of your luggage less than the capacity of your bags. So it depends on how much stuff you want to take, and how big your panniers are. Aerodynamics doesn't really matter for touring. Unless you are cycling rather fast, or it is very windy. Usually the weight of your ...


6

I've been commuting by bicycle even since I learnt to ride as a kid, and I've never commuted in any other way. I'd like to add one aspect that nobody has mentioned yet: be wary of theft. If you stand at a traffic light in a busy city, and have a visible laptop-bag in a pannier at the rear, it can be all-to-easy for someone to grab it and ride away with ...


6

I commuted for years carrying just one pannier. In fact, I have a pair of mismatched panniers because I wore out one of each original pair. If you just have clothes and incidentals in the bag, one pannier is certainly sufficient -- you will barely notice the slight off-balance. Definitely worry about heel spacing. Figure out how to get the bags as far ...


5

Yes, it's common. Many low rider racks come with oversize U bolts specifically for this purpose, and the better ones bolt on to the brake posts like the Old Man Mountain rack shown below. If you're really lucky your suspension fork will have mounts for standard low-rider racks already (that's very rare though). There are a few caveats. First, try to put ...


5

If you want to carry a full-sized hiking backpack, your best option might be securing it into a BOB-type trailer. A big backpack would be hard to mount to one side of a bicycling without doing terrible things to weight distribution. I have a 25L Timbuk2 Especial Viaje backpack/pannier for commuting, and it works well for that but is already pretty heavy on ...


5

That particular bike looks like it has mounting points for a rear rack, which is the primary issue. In general, what you are looking for are the bolt holes or "braze-ons" usually just a few inches below where the seat stays connect to the seat tube, as well as ones above the rear axle on the dropout. If your bike doesn't have them, there are ways to mount a ...


4

Another option is to modify a rack so you can attach a backpack to it. I've seen this done, but unfortunately we didn't have a common language to discuss how well it worked. This guy had built the whole rack himself so it included a stand as well as the pack. This is how I would approach your problem, simply because panniers are all smaller than even a ...


3

I wasn't aware of a rule for this, but I would hang a single pannier on left because it's the non-drive side of the bike. I doubt it matters though. When I was buying a new rear wheel a few months back, I found the spoke patterns in some rear wheels are different on one side to the other, so I don't know if this would make a difference. (I'd have added ...


3

Get the rack first or get them together. You need the panniers to attach solid. Not all racks have the same places to attach. I have Surly Ortleib combo but that is like $200. An over the top design like this gives you more storage. And you could lash some stuff and maybe skip the panniers. Those two little tabs on the bottom are nice for lashing. ...


3

Be careful, you might have problems with your rear disk brake caliper interfering with rack. You might need a special rack made for this situation. Some bike models have brakes mounted between seat stay and chain stay (inside rear triangle) and can use most racks. See also this post: Rack (+ Pannier) for a bike with disc brakes


3

Something to take care of is the increase in influence from side winds, and a small increase in aerodynamic drag. I used to bike in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, which is often a bit windy, and you can immediately feel the difference riding with and without panniers. However the net effect from side wind can be overall positive; as with sail-boat, ...


3

One thing that surprised me about using panniers to commute was that the inside of the panniers had an influence on the stuff that I put in them. In particular, my panniers (JandD) partially expose the back sides of some of the mounting clips inside the bags themselves. I found that this exposed hardware scratched up my laptop one day; it could similarly ...


2

If I don't have much on a given day, should I just use one pannier or try to distribute between two? In general, how important is it to keep them balanced? If it's not heavy then it's not important, assuming it's close the wheel (so not much torque). I expect it's easier than a top-heavy back-pack. When I have more weight, how much will it change ...


2

I found a picture of how I did this! You can see the firmer, black foam with foil that I used on the outside, and the bits of softer foam that I used to pack everything in. The flap poking up covers the top when the pannier is closed. This photo is from when I was putting it together, so the contents is not well arranged. I make a simple frame so I could ...


2

While I am not familiar with your bike or its front fork. I would think a front pannier rack like this may work. http://www.zefal.com/en/racks/118-raider-front.html Please note that weight on the front fork makes the bike even easier to fall over. Please be very careful when the baby is on the back. I am not a fan of rear baby seats and would just buy a ...


2

For the upper mounts, there are brackets that clamp on the seat stay or the seat post and provide the regular braze-ons. I'm betting the p-clamps will hold more weight than the rack will, however try it well before your tour.


2

I'm primarily a daytime rider; if I'm riding with two panniers I mount the one on the left first because that is the side with my kickstand, and putting weight on the left (kickstand) side of the bike is more stable for me than the right hand side. If I'm riding with a single pannier I generally mount it on the left for most bicycles. It is: more stable ...


2

Edit: Front pannier rack for suspension fork Load on wheel or on frame: Front rack mounted on the suspension fork Front rack mounted on the frame I'm not sure if there is a preference between the two. Anyway, the latest recommendation for loaded touring is to have wide balloon tyres, research shows they give better comfort vs. suspension forks. ...


2

http://www.thule.com/en-us/us/campaigns/thule-packnpedal/thule-pack-n-pedal Fits pretty much any bike, front or rear, with or without suspension. Adding the side rails gives you lower center of gravity.


2

Racks specific for front suspension are not so common and there are questions often raised about the handling effects. Personally I have a Tubus Swing rack on my Giant XTC 2 and have found that works well, but then I am not a technical off road rider :). On the downside I believe that Tubus have stopped making the Swing so it may be harder to find. That ...


2

Here is another take on "bulk". At the time I completed the tour this photo was taken on I was using a home made quilt as my sleeping "bag". The quilt is the item in the blue/gray Sea to Summit dry bag sitting on top of the Extrawheel Voyager trailer. Now the quilt is not that heavy but it is clearly quite bulky taking up a lot of space, so much space that ...


1

I have an Old Man Mountain Pioneer mounted on a Cannondale Fifty-Fifty (Headshock Fatty suspension forks). I use Ortlieb Front Roller Plus panniers. I do pack the panniers with light items only (Therm-a-rest mattresses, sleeping bag, clothes). I don't have a handlebar-bag, I use the left side front pannier for that. I chose the OMM Pioneer design for two ...


1

Firstly, your girlfriend has her light mounted incorrectly. If at all possible move it further back on the bike, so that the tyre and frame don't block the view of it. If the light is designed to be mounted there it's a poor design. Having the big block of colour/reflectors on the road side sounds like a good idea. But the pannier will still be visible on ...


1

I really like my "Shoulder it" pannier bag by Ortlieb, it was very convenient for commuting to and carrying inside the university. I even carry it sometimes when I'm not on a bike, though it's not so comfortable on clip-on side. Check out their Racktime series, there are other convertibles there, including backpacks.


1

I rode with a nice Arkel pannier during my first year of bike commuting, but attaching and removing became tedious. Now, I have two rear-mount Wald folding basket panniers. I use a large messenger backpack for my daily commute that slides easily in and out one of the baskets. Likewise, my reusable grocery bags become my panniers when shopping. They may ...


1

Such a thing does exist and it's the best! I own an Arkel Sherpack and Randonneur rack. The rack is great because I don't have any mounting points on my frame for traditional panniers. The rack hold very tight. I have commuted with two hefty laptops, lunch, and a change of clothes on it. I've been doing that kind of thing for well over a year. Everything has ...


1

If you have water proof panniers made of soft plastic, patches made for fixing holes in bike tubes are really great (depending on the size of the holes in the panniers of course).



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