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8

It is hard to beat a “Sheffield” stand, as they make it easy to lock the bike and don’t bend your wheels if the bike is knocked over. Cambridge Cycling Campaign did a good write up on the options.


7

They provide the rack for you to park your bike not necessarily lock it, that part is up to you. I have never heard anyone make a claim that ANY rack is safe, the courts will find that it is your responsibility to check the effectiveness of the rack. If shopping centers were responsible for the security of your bike, you would soon find that bike racks ...


7

Try a Garden Centre, they usually sell a range of trays and they should have something suitable. An example would be this "Giant Plus Garden Tray" which at 120cm x 55cm should be big enough to place a bike on.


6

If you need to fit a large number of bikes into a small(ish) space, hanging them on the wall is usually the best option. The simplest and cheapest route is to mount hooks into the studs which will normally be at 16" centers. If you want different spacing you can mount a header like a 2x6 or 2x8 to the to the wall and attach the hooks to the header. We ...


5

Use your phone to take a photo of your bike location, being sure to get some easy to find landmarks in the photo as well. E.g. if you had just taken the photo above and your bike is the front centre one, those two trees should be fairly easy to find again when you come back. If it still takes a while to find (or the search area is very big) and your phone ...


5

The recently opened Berkeley Bike Station has a few of these, and I've been quite impressed: They're really easy to use, and are the highest bike/sqft solution I've seen. They also have some of the less fancy ones, which are similar to the solution suggested by Gary.Ray:


4

I use a few cardboard boxes taped together with gaffer's tape. The tape is waterproof. 2 layers of cardboard (staggered at edges if you're using small boxes) is plenty to make it through a season. Use the box edges up against a wall to prevent splatter. If you have uneven floors and the water rolls off of the boxes, fold an edge over to cause it to be ...


4

I am not a lawyer, but it looks to me that it would be a big no. It is your decision to put it in the rack. And in any case, they are actually pretty good - they are the most common type and I have never had one cause any damage in 35 years.


4

Buy an electronic key finder. Attach the keyring part to your bike, when you want to find your bike you press the button on the remote and the keyring beeps and flashes. Range is 40 meters which should easily be enough.


4

In these kind of situations I use the tips that a guru taught me when I was learning the ways of triathlon. In the transition area, where you leave your bike to collect at the end of the swim, you are quite often assigned a spot for your number (otherwise everyone clamours for the ends of rows). So it's about landmarks, "3rd row, lake-side, half way down, ...


4

Aside from the fact that your bike is the only one you'll be able to unlock, the best thing for you to do is park in the same location every day. That can be an invitation to have your bike stolen, however. You can either: Make your bike easily distinguishable from the crowd. Putting something brightly-colored on the bars might help, attaching a safety ...


4

There is the n'lock: Nlock. Which appears to be in production and come in a variety of sizes to fit different bars. I have no actual experience with them but it looks like it meets the requirements you set out.


3

The short answer is "No, it's likely that the store has no liability for the theft of your bike." I am not a lawyer, so this longer answer is to the best of my layman's understanding The key legal issue in the US is one of Bailment. For a bailment to be created the property in question has to be delivered to the bailee (the store or it's representative) by ...


3

They are anyway not liable, and these are the reasons that I can think of: They never said that is was a secured rack. If you had secured your bike to a small tree, and the tree was cut and your bike taken, you wouldn't sue the government for not making stronger trees and not putting a sign to warn you: 'This is an insecure tree. Be warned' When you parked ...


2

Decorate your bike so that it stands out a bit. I usually paint the rear mudguard a bright colour and attach something colourfull to my handlebars. And I try to park my bicycle in the same row each day.


2

I have seen lot of damage wheels from racks like this, the probem is they are are often fitted too close, so when someone take there bike out, they have to fight with yours. There is also no good way to lock the bike to the rack with most locks.


2

On the cheaper side, a tarp or a vinyl tablecloth should do the trick, and be more easily tidied away and stored. Even a decent-weight shower curtain!


1

I have been designing and installing bicycle parking facilities for more than 10 years. The owner of the rack has a duty of care to supply a bike rack fit for purpose - that a rider can lock their bike to the rack and the bike will be secure. 'Secure' is open to interpretation. My interpretation is that a lock should not be able to be removed from a bike ...


1

My grandparents used to cover their entry way carpets with a vinyl carpet protector in the winter. The nice thing about this is that you can roll it up for storage when you aren't using it.


1

I painted my mudguards bright red to aid visibility, but it doesn't actually help that much. The thing that worked best for me was attaching a small pink teddy to the back of the pannier rack (like truckers do to their radiators). It's eye-catching even in a crowd. It's less good at Cambridge station, which is an extreme case, but works well in a long row of ...


1

Also on the insurance side, my policy requires me to fasten my bike to an immovable object. (This clause caused me to sink a couple of anchors into the concrete floor of my own garage.) So obviously if somebody has been able to walk away with the rack... I'm afraid to say that not only will the store not be liable, but you may have no luck if you try to ...


1

The dutch cycling association has a nice overview (in dutch) of bicycle stands they consider "ok" which means: They don't damage your bike directly They allow bikes to be removed easily They are vandalism proof. Find the overview here in dutch (to english google translate link) the model called "tulip" is my favorite. It is used for the bicycle parking ...



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