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The main differences to the drive train is the length of the rear derailleur arm. MTBs have lower and wider spaced gearing which means the rear derailleur has to handle a bigger span in chain length. A MTB typically has a large chainring with 42 teeth and a small one with 22 and a rear cassette with 12 - 28 tooth span - so the chain has to fit both a 42+28 ...


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I think this is quite a broad question, so I'll highlight a few parts of the bike: Seatposts/saddles: Probably interchangable Forks: You wouldn't want to swap them, and chances are a beefy mountain fork wouldn't go into a road frame anyway, even if you could get the right headset. Gearing: Road bikes typically have higher gearing than mountain bikes ...


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The cages for a double and triple are shaped differently, so you need to get the derailleur for the right number of chainrings in the front. The derailleur also needs to have enough capacity to shift between the chainrings you have as well as clear the largest chainring. As usual, Sheldon is a good person to start with regarding FD selection. The number of ...


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The first number is the number of front gears and the second number is the number of rear gears. How many gears do you want / need is for you to decide. The gear range is the smallest and largest. Even with 7 speed you could have big range. The down side is a bigger step between gears. You could have a 10 speed rear with only a difference of 1 tooth ...


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It is possible, but not likely economically a good move, especially if you're not doing the labor to swap the bike parts yourself (assuming you own the tool to remove the bottom bracket and what not). The bike is a relatively cheap one (~300 dollars), and you're likely to come out better financially by selling the bike and buying a larger one (which may have ...


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I asked a similar question (similar, because people recommended a hybrid): What bike+equipment for a long daily urban commute? The bike that I bought cost $700 after a discount for being last year's model, so it afforded/included disc brakes (and I like it very much). The best thing about disc brakes is that they work: On a steep down-hill, and/or at top ...


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Typically, you don't need disc brakes on a bike which lives on the road or other nice surfaces. The primary advantage on the road is that you don't have to deal with wheel true-ness as much, and that they look cool. For wet weather riding, they can stop you a bit quicker, but with properly adjusted V-brakes, you can stop pretty damn quickly once you learn to ...


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$500 is close call as the money in the disc is money they did not use elsewhere. I think you should evaluate the bikes you like at $500 and use disc as one factor. At $500 I would look for upgraded components. At $800 you start to get a lot more disc. Yes you will get disc on $500 bikes and you will get full suspension but that does not mean it was ...


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I mean it depends on your current component spec, but I would tend to say disc brakes. Good brakes will do wonders for your confidence riding, and will allow you to ride a broader range of trails, in terms of both trail style and technical difficulty. That said, you can get set up with a set of Avid BB7s for a pretty reasonable price, and leave yourself ...



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