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1

Don't buy that XT groupset for that bike to solve those problems - it wont work. XT is great, but it won't make your bike more comfortable, and it wont make it better off-road. Worse, it wont work for that bike since it has V-brakes, and that groupset has disk brakes. They are not compatible. To make it better off-road you need (in this order) better ...


1

You still want the axis approximately at 30% of your feet's length - that's when pedalling is most efficient. Just try to pedal with your feet's centre or back on pedal. Full-foot pedals accordingly will be asymmetric, implying they will be one sided and will tend to point to the ground with their backs when you're off-pedal making, as mentioned before they ...


3

One big difference is where the force is applied. In a conventional pedal, you press down using the ball of you foot. In a foot-long pedal you would have to center the axle so the pedal stays level, but that would mean that the force would be applied by the middle of your foot. You would be losing the power and flexibility that your ankle can bring. Being ...


9

I'd wager the two biggest reasons you don't see foot-sized pedals are the increased rotational weight, and the difficulty you would have catching the pedal with your foot before it struck the ground or the front tire. I'm sure someone tried this once and promptly scrapped the idea after the foot-sized pedal struck something. Pedals need to be stiff and ...


2

I did a similar conversion of a woman's road bike (1975 Peugeot UE18) to a commuter. The main changes were switching out the handlebars from drop bars to porteur style bars, the inclusion of a dynohub, and the addition of a two-legged kickstand for stability. My Peugeot already had a nice saddle but in your case I'd add a good Brook's saddle since your ...


6

That's a nice looking bike, it seems like it would be a great start for your project. The big question is whether or not the bike fits you – if it does it will be worth considering what else you could do to make the bike into a dependable commuter / day touring bike. Start by trying to get the saddle and handlebars into a position where you are comfortable ...


0

I have a 15km commute to work and have been doing it roughly 3x per week (twice a day) for about 8 years. Here's what I have found works: puncture resistant tires are one of the keys -- I found that the Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires were great and in > 6000kms on 2 sets I've experienced a single flat tire. patch kit with a small pump floor pump at home for ...


0

Researching on this myself, the main reasons I've found is that more surface (road) is better for power transmission and more comfortable on longer rides, which you would also want on MTB but road cleat can be inutilized with mud or just natural soil not tarmac, so you could have problems stepping with road shoes on a MTB track terrain then trying to reclip ...


0

Replacing the Racing T derailleur with the Athena 11s derailleur fixed the issue. The racing T derailleur seams to don't work with the 35mm Campagnolo clamp. Or generally don't work with frames wider than 28mm.


2

The chainwheel does not sit at the correct chain line is the answer. The most common cause is that you have an axle length shorter/longer than the ideal chain line. In this case, you have a shorter axle length. Did you add another chainring into your crankset? If the answer is yes, you will need to tweak around: either adding spacer (not recommended) or ...


2

The answer is NOBODY. Jones is the only manufacturer of the closed loop H-bar. After nearly a year of searching for a cheaper alternative I finally just bit the bullet and ordered the bar from Jones. It would have been better if I had ordered it sooner instead of holding out in hopes of finding an alternative manufacturer, I really got dinged by exchange ...


2

Not to be snarky, but a quick search turned up a list of components on the bike. Another quick search turned up the Scott product archive (admittedly, not particularly helpful, at least from what I saw), and the Scott Sports FAQ, which, in response to the question "Can I get spare parts from SCOTT?" replies: "Yes, SCOTT offers a broad range of spare parts. ...


5

You should look your bike up online, you should be able to find a stats page that will give you some general specs. The shops I have been in do not have a "manual" per se of what frames conform to which standards. It's generally done through experience and visual confirmation/measurement of the bike in front of them. Derailleur hangers are generally ...



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