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2

On your particular shock, it is as you guessed just a cover to keep out dirt. Replacement parts for these shocks are generally not available. I would suggest a visit to a local hardware store and find a generic rubber /plastic plug that will fit in the hole.


3

It's steering damper. It prevents your handlebar from self - turning. Increase comfort. Steering damper


0

You might succeed with a screw extractor. If you can drill into the head, this will give you purchase. It depends on how hard the bolt head is. I recommend center punching before drilling. Some penetrating oil on the threads might help as well.


1

I expect that when you try to turn the nut you'll rind that the round bolt head is eccentric on the bolt. Side on it looks like the sketch below, and means the bolt won't rotate once it's in the hole. This is quite old school, and they're very easy to manufacture with only fairly basic hand tools. Imagine trying to cut a hexagonal hole into a pedal using ...


2

I'm going to guess that the bike's fork is lacking in follow (ie it has straight forks, or forks without enough bend) so that without the spring, the bike will not self-center. It will likely feel that it wanders over the road and the rider has to actively keep it centered. You probably can't ride hands-free without the spring. The spring provides some ...


15

The purpose of such a steering damper is to stop the front wheel from turning when using a (two-leg) kickstand or while pushing the bike. Not much use otherwise.


14

They're trying to sell you stuff. More expensive stuff (have you looked at 11 speed consumable (chain+cassette) prices vs 10 speed?). I would not bother upgrading. As groups go to higher and higher speeds, the older stuff gets pushed down to lower component levels. So today's 11 speed 105 group will be next year's (or likely a few years later) Tiagra ...


1

Within "normal" standards of long and high angle, yes it is safe. While there are some stems which use clamping styles which are not carbon safe, or other restrictions, these are usually clearly stated. No restrictions are based on length or angle of the stem, that I am aware of. I have been a certified professional bicycle mechanic for 20 years, so I ...


3

Given that all other things, e.g. type/diameter of the axle, are the same, the difference of two teeth on the middle chainring do not present a problem.


0

It is an economic law that the value (=cost) increases if you split something in smaller parts. Examples: tomatoes sold separately are more expensive than when sold together in a box, crate, or truck load you make more money when selling apartments than when selling the entire building at once This might be related to the physics principle of entropy. ...


3

Prices of goods are pretty much unrelated to the cost to make them, they are set at the maximum value company can get away with. Parts are generally sold for repairs, not new bike construction. If you already have a perfectly fine 95% of the bike, your two options are spend a lot to get a whole new bike, or a little to get a new component. Even if the ...


17

In addition to economies of scale, you also have to consider the difference in price sensitivity and leverage between a manufacturer and a consumer. If Shimano told Trek that they'd start paying retail prices for their cranks, for example, your next Trek would have SRAM cranks. You can be sure they've negotiated the lowest plausible price, because it's very ...


32

Economics of scale. For instance, when a bike manufacturer buys thousands of groupsets directly from a component manufacturer, they get a significantly better per unit price than a retailer can. The retailer not only must necessarily buy in lower volume, but also typically buys through one or more layers of middlemen, each layer adding their cut to the ...


1

Protects the chain-stay from the chain itself when taking the wheel out, be it for cleaning or whatever. Also stops the chain slapping it on bumpy roads or descents. Not sure what you'd call it, I'd just call it a chain-stay protector. Some people use what's called Helicopter tape for the same purpose, too. I'd keep that thing on there, it then looks like ...


11

That is a "chain stay protector" and it is installed in, let us say, a non-traditional way. Typically it would be a couple inches forward of where it is. As the name suggests, the purpose of the pad is to protect the chain stay from wear and damage from the chain, which can hit the stay with a lot of force when riding at high speed over rough terrain.


0

should I just get down the local shop and have them replace the retainers? Or would it be better to replace the entire headset Replacing the bearings and retainers is cheap and easy (you should be able to do that yourself), you just need to work out what size you want. Since you have all the parts, measure the size of the ring and the bearing diameter ...


0

I would be inclined to replace the headset. It's a simple fix, guaranteed result.


2

It looks to me like you just lost the nut. A stainless steel nut and washer or a stainless steel nylock nut would work best for this application. These options would help prevent the nut from coming loose and falling off again. You could also try using threadlock to help secure the nut as well.


2

You need Leather washers in between the metal fender and frame. a washer and locking nut to secure the fixing bolt. For detailed instructions on metal fender install see the detailed Velo Oranges fender manual.



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