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2

Pretty much been done to death with evangelistic enthusiasm on many forums. Smaller wheels - more agile and responsive, lighter/stronger, easier to control Larger Wheels - roll better over small obstacles therefore considered faster in straight lines, lower tire pressures (due bigger tire) provide more traction off paved roads. Slower to accelerate ...


-1

If you take cycling seriously, the relationship that you have with your LBS is very important. Everyone at my LBS knows me and I know them. Having purchased many high-end bicycles over the past 20 years from two bike shops (depending on where I lived), I get first-rate customer service anytime I walk through the door. The owners, sales staff, and my ...


0

My hoods were degrading too causing me to get black rubber on my hands after every ride. I called Shimano and they said that they no longer support the ST-5500 lever and they do not carry any replacement parts. I called Hudz, and they said that they do not have hoods that are compatible. A STOPGAP SOLUTION: Rub your hoods with baby powder. It makes them ...


0

way back in the 70's I bought my first bike at a 'bike store' and thought having to lean to a side was the norm. Years later, having much more experience, I found out the frame was misaligned. What got me is this store which was supposed to be catering to bike enthusiasts would put out something like that and sell it at a premium price. If a frame is ...


3

The difference is the support you get afterwards. If you buy a decent (non-BSO) bike online, you're generally on your own for support unless you take it to a bike shop and shell out some money. They often won't let you swap out the bike with another size if it doesn't fit you properly either. On the other hand, if you go to your local bike shop, many of ...


12

It matters in many ways where you buy the bike from. If you're buying online, then the parts will most likely be the same, although you should be careful to read the specs. Some online (brick and mortar as well) shops will have overstock bikes from previous years and the parts will be different from the current model year. If you buy from a local bike ...


3

On a bicycle the store is the final point of assembly. The bicycle arrives in a box unassembled. So yes it makes a difference. The parts are in the box so unless you swap out some part you will get the same parts. I bought a high end bike at a general sports store where they also sold ski and camping equipment. It took me hours to get that bike running ...



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