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34

What could be simpler than remembering that the left-hand pedal has left-hand thread?


32

The Pedaling Technique of Elite Endurance Cyclists: Changes With Increasing Workload at Constant Cadence was published in the International Journal of Sport Biometrics 7:29-53, 1991. However, it seems to come to the conclusion that they don't really make any difference as far as pedaling efficiency goes. "...while torque during the upstroke did reduce the ...


28

Higher-end bikes are expected to be used with clipless pedals. However, there are several different standards for these pedals, and all of which have a different type of cleat that fits in them. Most cyclists tend to stick with one of these standards across all of their bikes, so they don't have to have multiple sets of shoes. Thus higher-end bicycles ...


26

You're most efficient sitting with a cadence between 80 - 100 (faster if you can do it) so it's recommended that you stay seated as much as possible. For mountain biking staying seated increases the weight on your rear tire and reduces the chances of it slipping as long as you can keep a smooth spin stroke and not 'mash' the pedals on the down stroke. ...


24

Pedal Selection Pick a system that will work well for your current and future use. It's annoying to have different shoes for different bikes. My experience is limited to Shimano SPDs and Crank Brothers systems -- both of these work very well for road and mountain biking. The shoe cleat is similar for both systems and is fairly small, which means you can ...


24

First up, I'd strongly recommend switching to clipless pedals. I had the same discomfort issues you're describing with normal shoes and toeclips and find clipless pedal so much more comfortable and secure (therefore safer). When comparing and evaluating clipless pedal systems, some of the more important attributes are: Float - This is the property where ...


23

Terminology is important here. Pedal Clips (refer here) are straps that tighten around the shoe. Clipless, such as SPD have a cleat - refer here Toe clips are not common these days - but still used by some (touring and fixed hub bikes) more niche applications. I assume you are talking about SPD style clipless pedals, but the following discussion does not ...


20

When you fit toe clips to your pedals, that spike is there to help you flip the pedal over so the clip is on the top. The pedals have an up and down orientation when toeclips are fitted.


18

Make sure the tension is low at first (should be a little screwn on face of pedal). Generally you will get to a point of looseness where you are popping out unintentionally, go just tigher than that. Cleat placement also can be a factor. The closer to the toe it is, the easier it tends to be to get out. Be careful about moving too far from the balls of ...


18

The reverse threading is to counter precession, not friction from the bearings. The wiki page explains it well (and I doubt I could): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precession_(mechanical)


17

I found toe clips to be better than platform pedals, but not by a huge amount. Seriously, get clipless pedals. It doesn't matter how much traffic there is as it's so easy to get your foot in or out of the pedals. The advantages are huge. The cycling shoes are so much more comfortable than street shoes Your foot is so secure on the pedal - you can ...


17

You have to use an allen/hex wrench, that's why they have the hex hole in the axle. Going from the opposite side through the frame is easiest.


16

The case for/against clipless, or even straps, is sort of summed up in this piece from the Rivendell Bicycles website. They mention studies, albeit without citing the exact source, that actually pulling up on the pedal is extremely unlikely, except maybe on short uphill or sprint bursts, and so being attached to the pedal is far from being a must. And they ...


16

First let's clarify the difference between "clipless" and "clip" pedals. They are confusing terms as both have clips. Clip pedals (which I prefer to call cages) look like this: Cages have the advantage that they can be used with normal shoes. To get your foot into them you push it in from the rear and (optionally) reach down and tighten the strap. In my ...


15

Flat pedals are great for lots of reasons, but I won't get into the virtues or pitfalls of platforms versus toe clips versus clipless systems (though I am a big fan of plain old platform pedals.) I will try to give information pertaining to the different styles and a few examples rather than an exhaustive list of specific brands and prices. There are lots ...


15

This sounds like a issue in your freehub/freewheel (both are mechanically the same for this question). This is what allows you to coast without pedaling. Inside these bodies are a set of "pawls" which will flip down and engage a series of splines when rotated "forward", and propels the bike forward. Then, if you move them in the other direction ...


14

I doubt that you actually managed to screw your pedals into the wrong sides. If it can even be done, the amount of force required to do so would have easily alerted you that you were doing something dreadfully wrong. Not to mention the aluminum shavings that would have been all over the place. Pedals can get pretty snug just through the action of peddling ...


13

The pedals you have are known as mountain bike clipless pedals. They have a platform side where you can use normal sneakers/shoes to ride, and the other side with the "hump" is the clipless side. There are special shoes with cleats on the bottom that attach to the pedals,and they're there to increase your pedaling capacity by allowing you to pull up on them ...


13

That's for mounting straps on the pedal. Here's a picture of a pedal with the straps on it: Which side of the pedal should you use? On some pedals, one side has an axis that protrudes a bit, and the other side is flat; the latter is the one you should use. However, if both sides of the pedal are flat, feel free to use either side of the pedal.


12

Q1: No, "float" is the amount your feet can rotate (around a vertical axis) while clipped in. A system/cleat with little or no float keeps your foot in a very rigid position. You can't freely twist your toe/heel while pedaling. If you have a textbook pedal stroke, low float will keep your feet in the right place so you can focus on other things. With ...


12

A technique which may help you get a more efficient pedaling stroke is an exercise called isolated leg. With your bicycle on a trainer or on a slight uphill, unclip your left leg and pedal using only your right leg for 30-60 strokes. Then switch and do the same for your other leg. This exercise will give a very natural feel to how your legs should be ...


12

Pushing down on the pedals is a natural thing. So to improve the "roundness" of your pedal stroke, completely ignore the down-stroke, instead focus on the following: Continuing the pedal stroke "across the bottom". This will probably feel something like trying to scrape mud off the bottom of your shoe. On the up-stroke, focus on driving your knee upwards ...


12

There are pedals that have a cleat clip on one side and a traditional platform pedal on the other side. You could attach the clip to the platform side and use the cleat side when you're riding with cycling shoes. You might have problems when you're clipped in because the toe clip might hang too low and catch the road when you're leaning into corners.


12

Lengthening the wrench is your best bet. You don't need anything fancy, find a bit of pipe at your local hardware shop that fits over the wrench. Watch your fingers. While trying to remove a tricky pedal, it gave suddenly and my knuckles hit the teeth of the chain ring. It was a daft and bloody mistake.


12

Your best bet is to use mechanical advantage to your benefit. What you want to do is line the wrench up with the opposite crank, so that your hands are as close together as possible, now straddle the frame and force the two apart. Here's an image from Park's description of how to remove a pedal that illustrates it well: The worst position for the wrench ...


12

Like Daniel Hicks says, they are threaded opposite to each other. This ensures the act of you pedaling is constantly tightening them both. If they were both the usual right hand threads then the left pedal would eventually unscrew and fall off. So, if you're like me and use the right hand rule to constantly assess which direction you should be turning ...


12

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


12

I'd wager the two biggest reasons you don't see foot-sized pedals are the increased rotational weight, and the difficulty you would have catching the pedal with your foot before it struck the ground or the front tire. I'm sure someone tried this once and promptly scrapped the idea after the foot-sized pedal struck something. Pedals need to be stiff and ...


11

Hmm, we're kind of hitting most of the answer but not all of it (in my opinion that is!). Its probably better to ask this the other way round - why not use a road pedal on a mountain bike... On a road bike you're generally going to keep your foot in the pedal, you're only going to take it out to stop so therefore you want it to be as simple and as light as ...



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