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6

If you're never walking on the cleats and can track-stand at junctions and traffic lights they should almost never wear out. There is minimal wear clipping in and out. The reds are 9 degrees of float before unclipping which may increase the wear though. I use the black cleats (0 degrees) and I wear out the bottom of the cleats through walking and ...


4

Generally speaking, when a pedal works its way loose and is ridden for a decent amount of time, it does strip (and thus ruin) the crank arm. The only way you can be sure that the crank arm is good is to inspect it. So I'd guess your crank arm is damaged (especially if its at the point where you can't loosen the pedal). A picture of how its bent in would be ...


3

Drop the chain and try to rotate cranks. If "skip" feels then I would look into BB. If not, then pretty much sounds like kink in the chain which is very possible on very new or very old chains. Very new chains can be over-pressurised while installing and therefore one link connection is just not flexible enough which makes it "skip" when going through the ...


2

I've had something similar (but more dramatic) happen and I lost the crank arm. It seems to be made of softer medal, luckily, than the pedal, which was absolutely fine and I still use. Crank arms are pretty cheap when compared to pedals anyway. The damage may all be to the crank arm. I agree with Batman, the crank arms is probably a write-off. But it's ...


2

I use some of these if I'm touring and want to travel light, I put them in my bag but I reckon they could slip in to a jersey pocket, I'll try after work today. I've used cleat covers before and, though they protect the cleat, didn't feel they were a proper solution - you still end up walking weirdly because the only contact point is the cleat.


1

As others have pointed out, it's probably not so much bent but cross-threaded. The threads fatigued because the shoulder on the pedal shaft wasn't seated on the crank arm. If you keep riding it as-is (not suggested) the pedal will fall off all by itself! One thing in your favor: judging by the ~3mm gap between the shoulder and the crank arm, you might have ...


1

I've had similar problems (clicking on the right side down stroke) before, and it is probably the bottom bracket. But the first thing to do is to check and make sure that you don't have a loose bolt/ nut somewhere. This could be in your pedal, the crank, or somewhere else in your drivetrain. If you make sure that everything is tight and it still doesn't ...


1

Cleat covers are fine but there's no reason why a pair of road cleats with the rubber anti-slip bumpers still in place would scratch slate. If you're using MTB SPD cleats then definitely they'll damage floors. To be totally honest, if I'm concerned (for example one cafe has steep stairs to the bathroom) I tend to just take the shoes off. If the cafe is a ...


1

If you're using SPD-SL, cleat covers or insertable seem to be the only "nice" ways to go. [I use Look, so I'm in a similar boat.] However, if you switch to SPD (which requires different pedals), there are plenty of shoes (and sandals) which have recessed cleats so you can walk around without damaging anything and wear all day without problems. And a lot of ...


1

Hit it with a bigger wrench. Right side should have normal threads. CNC Pedal Rod I would try a bigger wrench before drilling it out. You have to drill exactly in the center. You will need a press. If the pedal bent there is a pretty good chance crank was damaged. If the threads are just marred up a bit you might be able to clean them up by running a ...



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