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17

You have to use an allen/hex wrench, that's why they have the hex hole in the axle. Going from the opposite side through the frame is easiest.


15

This sounds like a issue in your freehub/freewheel (both are mechanically the same for this question). This is what allows you to coast without pedaling. Inside these bodies are a set of "pawls" which will flip down and engage a series of splines when rotated "forward", and propels the bike forward. Then, if you move them in the other direction "backwards"...


9

There is a lot of discussion about this topic (i.e. a lot of anecdotes) because pedals are a very personal matter (cf. LondonCyclist or Zach Gallardo). However, I think that you're over-thinking this in some way: The "safest" pedal is the pedal you're most used to and comfortable with. Consider, for example, a hypothetical case where clipless pedals have ...


8

Well, there are a ton of adjustments you can make, but sometimes a bike just won't fit someone. You may want to look up "bike fit", though this is something you probably should have done before you bought the bike. You can: Move the saddle backwards Move the saddle up/down Change the angle of the saddle Change the stem height Change the stem (to get a ...


7

On Shimano SPD pedals, you can sometimes adjust the tension for how tightly they clip in (likely via a hex bolt). If the tension is too low, your feet will be too easy to pop out, whereas if its too high, you won't easily be able to get out (which isn't a problem on an indoor cycling setup). Try playing with this setting to see if you stay clipped in (...


6

Looks like a pair of Forté Carve pedals. Forté is a house brand of Performance Bicycles. I checked their website, but this particular model of pedal doesn't appear to be available any longer. (photo from College Tri blog) Here's another photo that shows the "CARVE" logo with the stylyized "V" engraved into the cross piece that matches the letters you ...


5

Doing it like the first picture shows is definitely not a good idea. The strap should be the other way round with the buckle as close as possible to the pedal's body. Reason 1: it can be tightened by pulling the end up and released with a the flick of the thumb on the buckle. (The reason for this black plastic end of the buckle) Reason 2: The end of the ...


4

You can try to helicoil the crankset. This is an insert which can be used to repair threading, though you need some special tools to do it. Your bike shop may or may not have this as an option. They may charge you as much as dropping in a new SRAM S100 crankset for this. The crankset uses a Powerspline BB (which means if you to keep the BB, you're going to ...


4

If the instructions that come with the pedals tell you to use the washers with carbon cranks then you should do it. The reason for the washers is that that they keep the axle from rubbing against the crank and thus damaging the carbon when tightening the pedals.Oh yes, and you can compensate the thickness of the washers by moving each cleat 0.5mm outside.


4

What I'm guessing is happening is that your reaction arm (the thing on the left of the diagram) is not fixed in place. When you brake the shoes of the brake are pushed out from the axle into the shell of the wheel hub. The idea being that the axle is fixed in place and the shoes drag against the shell. If the reaction arm was undone, the friction of the ...


4

The FSA Warranty is 2 years on cranksets. I would still contact them to see what they recommend.They might be able to repair, recommend a company who can repair or offer you a lower-cost replacement. You didn't say which crank arm it is but they may also be able to provide a replacement for just that crank arm. I would also stop using the crank for now for ...


4

Something is dragging as you pedal harder. The most likely thing is that your rear wheel is moving so that the tire drags against the chain stay when you apply power. This is something that you'll probably need to troubleshoot when you're riding because it isn't likely to show up with the bike on a work stand. You might be able to make it happen by applying ...


4

Because they are installed wrong. You can remove one crank using crank puller and install it in correct position, or take it back to shop.


4

Yes, this does. Another option is to re-thread the cranks if you take it to the right bike shop, and then install a standard pedal.


4

Yes, I've used a variety of folding pedals on my Dahon and Brompton and they're all a bit flexy. I've had plastic ones snap in half on me (and yes, that can be very painful/dangerous). The best ones I've had were all-metal ones in which the axle and folding pedal were both metal. But even those aren't as strong as fixed pedals -- and none of the folding ...


3

My guess is that your rear end is flexing and either: Rear rim is touching the brake pad, or Tire is rubbing the chainstay With the former, try checking your wheel alignment and loosing your brakes a bit (safely) and testing. With the latter, look for tire rub marks in your chainstay area where the chainstay meets the bottom bracket.


3

You need a large allen key, often an 8mm to tighten that centre bolt right down. It'll pull the crank arm onto the spindle and secure it. The LH-FSA-AL ring is the self extracting bolt, the internal hex bolt pushes on the back of it to pull the crank off without extra tools. That has a left hand thread so that it doesn't unscrew as the internal bolt ...


3

With the cleats of the Shimano SPD MTB style pedals the side float* is +/-3° and system inherent. Nothing else is available. There are however two different types of cleats: One type will only release with a horizontal motion (SH-51), the other also with a vertical movement or combined vertical horizontal movement SH-56). Bikeradar has a description of the ...


3

I always say to myself "back off" - as both pedals unscrew towards the back which helps me remember which way to turn.


3

These are SPD-R pedals. SPD-R is Shimano's older road pedal system, and its cleats have different bolt pattern than either SPD or any other road pedal. The cleats are still available from some online shops, but you need either old SPD-R compatible shoes or an adapter plate to use them.


2

I went from flats to half-toe clips, which had no noticeable impact. I changed back to flats after an accident where the toe clip was upside down and snagged on something. Plus I found it fiddly to clip-in/hook-on at the lights. So back to flats... and the differences became clear. You stay on the pedal a lot better - I noticed that a bad gear change or ...


2

I was amazed to recently discover the Dura Ace carbon body is 0.5mm narrower than the body on the Ultegra. This was discovered quite by accident. I have a carbon centaur equipped winter bike on which I have Ultegra 6800 pedals and a specialised roubaix with 105. So I decided to finally splash out on dura ace pedals to match the dura ace 9000 group set on ...


2

Common sizes are a 5 or 6 millimetre Allen key or Hex Driver on the back side of the crank. Or, you can also use a 15mm pedal spanner on the two flats which will be on the pedal-side of the thread. These tend to be a bit thinner than a normal adjustable spanner. Do be aware your left foot pedal is a left hand thread so you turn it the opposite way to ...


2

You have a loose bottom bracket. It needs to be replaced. You need to buy a new bottom bracket, along with two special tools: A crank puller and a bottom-bracket tool. If your current bottom-bracket is cup-and-cone style (I'm betting it is), it can be removed with basic tools and elbow grease. If it's cartridge style, it can be removed with the BB tool. ...


2

PeteH has implied it, but sounds like something has gone drastically wrong in a bearing somewhere. I'd suggest you remove the chain from the front chainring and try to spin the pedal crank. It should turn easily, with no side-to-side slop. If not, check the rear wheel for the same, it should not feel gritty or notchy, and should not have sideways ...


2

Hole positions for Keo and Delta are exactly the same. I've switched over 3 years ago and the shoes didn't cause any problem.Even Shimano cleats of the 3-hole type have exactly the same pattern for the holes. And with the adapter Speedplay cleats will fit too.


2

My oldest is now 12 - Balance bikes were not readily available 10 years ago in my country. If I did it over again, I would use a balance bike (or take the pedals off a normal bike). Balance bikes provide a natural and safe learning progression. Most kids have come off some sort of sit astride plastic toy, a balance bike is really a 'big kids' version of ...


2

Is the balancing easier on big cycles after the kid learns to ride pedal less bicycle? The world is full of variation! Anacdotally, learning on a balance bike (no pedals) first, then transitioning to a pedal bike seems to work very well. This worked well for my mine and the neighbour's kids as we all seemed to transition without any major crashes. It ...


2

If they are steady on their feet and tall enough than a balance bike is fine. The advantage of a balance bike is it develops balance first as small children don't necessarily have the strength or co-ordination to ride a pedal bike to begin with. We found the wooden balance bikes to be inherently bigger - so for our child we went with the much smaller ...



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