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10

I'd wager the two biggest reasons you don't see foot-sized pedals are the increased rotational weight, and the difficulty you would have catching the pedal with your foot before it struck the ground or the front tire. I'm sure someone tried this once and promptly scrapped the idea after the foot-sized pedal struck something. Pedals need to be stiff and ...


8

I think most people find the bike-to-run transition quite difficult while the legs adjust from going in a circular motion to running. Particularly for longer distance courses. Here's an interesting article from a renowned triathlon athlete/coach: http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2007/01/cleat-position.html The article discusses the merits of putting ...


8

Assuming that you're talking about cleats on your shoes, there are three main attachment systems. Left: 2-bolt, Middle: 2 or 3 bolt, Right: 3 bolt. Notice how the one on the left has a chunkier sole. The two-bolt option is used for SPD which are popular with MTB, commuting and touring cyclists. I use 2-bolt SPD shoes on my audax bike because I'm able to ...


8

Well, there are a ton of adjustments you can make, but sometimes a bike just won't fit someone. You may want to look up "bike fit", though this is something you probably should have done before you bought the bike. You can: Move the saddle backwards Move the saddle up/down Change the angle of the saddle Change the stem height Change the stem (to get a ...


7

It's definitely possible that the bottom bracket height is lower than your previous bike and/or your crankarm length is longer. The BB could be lower to improve handling and I have definitely seen longer crankarms on large bikes. A typical measurement is 175cm but you could see 170 on a small frame or 180 on a larger frame. The longer crankarm would be ...


6

If you're never walking on the cleats and can track-stand at junctions and traffic lights they should almost never wear out. There is minimal wear clipping in and out. The reds are 9 degrees of float before unclipping which may increase the wear though. I use the black cleats (0 degrees) and I wear out the bottom of the cleats through walking and ...


6

First, note that if you're new to clip/clipless systems, it takes a while to get used to it. A lot of non-racers prefer mountain bike clipless pedals (e.g. Shimano SPD) since you can clip in on both sides of the pedal and the shoes often allow the cleats to be recessed (so you can walk around). Mountain marketed shoes generally tend to be more comfortable ...


6

There are bearings inside the pedal that are meant to keep things running smoothly. If it was just the pedal itself around a metal shaft, then things would probably wear out quite quickly. Some pedals are serviceable, while others are meant to be replaced completely. If you are sure that the snaps is coming from inside the pedal, and not from inside the ...


5

Yes there are lots of different options with pedals (it's a bit easier with shoes), but they can be summarised quite briefly. Types of pedals: Flat - a standard pedal on many bikes Flat pedal with toe clips. So you can still use any shoe, but the toe clip holds your shoe in place on the pedal. "Clipless" pedals - where both pedal and shoe have a some kind ...


5

A lot of causal riders appear to prefer SPD's, which is a great place to start, but I here is the argument for SPD-SL like systems. Which I personally prefer and even on dirty muddy roads. Road bike specific pedals (e.g., SPD-SL) are designed for a single purpose, road cycling, and the pedals do this job well. Road cycling has a lot of repetitive motions ...


4

Generally speaking, when a pedal works its way loose and is ridden for a decent amount of time, it does strip (and thus ruin) the crank arm. The only way you can be sure that the crank arm is good is to inspect it. So I'd guess your crank arm is damaged (especially if its at the point where you can't loosen the pedal). A picture of how its bent in would be ...


4

Mavic pedals are ATAC (see also the cleat page). They were developed by TIME and just rebranded by Mavic. So, I'd expect that they're compatible.


4

Those look like Shimano mountain SPD PD-M545 pedals: Looks like a pretty good match to the picture on the Shimano site, but if you don't see a Shimano logo on them, they could be third party compatible pedals. The cleats look like this: I'm not aware of a guide that compares all pedal styles, but there are not that many pedal types in common use and ...


3

There are many factors to consider. Without being able to be scientific about it, people do evolve a natural pedal technique and I don't see the point in trying to radically change it, rather you should first have your bike fit and set up performed properly, and then allow your own natural style to evolve. There have been major cycling champions that were ...


3

If You are DH racing, then we are talking about racetracks and trails thar are known to the rider, assuming that the rider is practicing and getting used to the track, picking best lines for each section and generally speaking, creating/refining a race strategy. In that context, a gear is to be selected acording to the particular needs of each section, ...


3

Drop the chain and try to rotate cranks. If "skip" feels then I would look into BB. If not, then pretty much sounds like kink in the chain which is very possible on very new or very old chains. Very new chains can be over-pressurised while installing and therefore one link connection is just not flexible enough which makes it "skip" when going through the ...


3

The threads are completely stuffed. Do not just screw the pedals back in and do not rely on loctite or similar compounds. Pedals falling off is at best inconvenient, at worst can lead to crash and serious injury. Easiest option is to replace the cranks. Its not a big job but parts cost might mean a repair is a better option for you. The bottom bracket will ...


3

The Click'R system allows for a more recessed cleat in the shoe. It is a very similar design to Shimano SPD but is marketed for commuters and trekkers who want dual purpose shoes for when they are on and off the bike. They also allow for multi-release meaning they offer a wider range of movement to release the cleat from the pedal making them easier to use. ...


3

It’s probably more a matter of pedal systems than shoes. High end shoes in both categories will be pretty good and stiff. I can only talk about Speedplay Zero (road bike pedals) vs. Look Quartz and Shimano SPD. The Speedplay Zero have a much greater area, have completly free adjustable movement sideways (as far as the crankarms allow it) and no play, ...


3

One big difference is where the force is applied. In a conventional pedal, you press down using the ball of you foot. In a foot-long pedal you would have to center the axle so the pedal stays level, but that would mean that the force would be applied by the middle of your foot. You would be losing the power and flexibility that your ankle can bring. Being ...


2

Probably too late, but since you said it was just the first few threads, you could run the proper size tap in to clean up the threads. I found this while looking for info about bike pedals for a completely unrelated project, so I don't know the correct thread size, but if you know it, you can tap that out and good as new. No need for helicoils or adapters, ...


2

I've had something similar (but more dramatic) happen and I lost the crank arm. It seems to be made of softer medal, luckily, than the pedal, which was absolutely fine and I still use. Crank arms are pretty cheap when compared to pedals anyway. The damage may all be to the crank arm. I agree with Batman, the crank arms is probably a write-off. But it's ...


2

Heating the pedal is not going to help here. Cool the pedal might. But if the hex is stripped too late. Use penetrating oil like Liquid Wrench over WD40 for this. I would have soaked it two days in penetrating oil before I went brute force. The risk of brute force is you that you strip out the crank. Use a drill press as it is really hard to center ...


2

Unless the pedals have bonded to the thread in the cranks, a longer lever is usually the way. As that seems to have failed, I'd get the cranks off, pop them in a vice and drill the cranks out.


2

10.9 is the type of steel alloy used, not the size of the hex key (aka allen key) you need. Get a set of hex keys (almost surely a metric set is needed, given that its on a bicycle) and then try them out to see which one fits. I'd guess its something in a 3mm, 4mm, 5mm or 6mm range.


2

The only thing you can do that is safe and reliable and sane is to get a new crankset. You'd need a helicoil or something similar to do the repair reliably and this would be less strong than a new crankset and cost more than the new crankset + installation. Next time, make sure everything is greased and tightened properly.


2

For flat pedals, here's my suggested preference order of shoe type: A skateboarding shoe. They have flat grippy soles with more stiffness than most shoes. A traditional bicycling shoe (intended for use with clips and straps). A shoe made for any indoor sport. Indoor soccer shoes (like John Zwinck linked to in a comment), basketball shoes, etc. These will ...


2

According to this site, the differences can be summed up in the following As for the carbon pedal body, the 6800 design differs from 9000 through its use of short carbon fibers instead of Dura-Ace's long carbon fibers. Essentially, this is where the extra weight comes from. Additionally, the carbon has been molded with a machined aluminum sleeve that ...


2

In addition to the points noted in other answers, there is a significant technical difference: bearings. Traditionally, Dura-Ace equipment with bearings has had much better quality bearings/races/cups/seals/etc. That appears to be true here as well. Look at the parts breakdown documents from shimano and you'll see a significant difference in the ...


2

I did find these http://www.yellowjersey.org/tocleat.html And Yellow Jersey is exactly the kind of shop you'd expect to find that stuff. The one in the image is for Road shoes, but I think could easily be adapted to SPD shoes with some work with a dremel tool. They say they will make a custom cleat for just about any shoe. You do realize that ...



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