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10

Welding aluminum and steel is not a DIY skill - read This. If you must repair rather than replace, a helicoil is the correct way to address the problem. A crank would be cheaper than the coil alone, let alone the time to fix it. Chemical bonding (AKA. Glue) is probably the only DIY solution. The issue I see is that when a pedal comes off while riding, it ...


8

I think most people find the bike-to-run transition quite difficult while the legs adjust from going in a circular motion to running. Particularly for longer distance courses. Here's an interesting article from a renowned triathlon athlete/coach: http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2007/01/cleat-position.html The article discusses the merits of putting ...


8

This is part comment, part answer, but too long to fit in a comment, so here we go. Personally, I use SPD, and when I ride with a group, everyone else has SPD-SL or LOOK. I'm usually clipped in and across the intersection before they're clipped in. Either I'm just really good at clipping in, or SPD are designed to be easier to get clipped in to. Even the ...


8

Assuming that you're talking about cleats on your shoes, there are three main attachment systems. Left: 2-bolt, Middle: 2 or 3 bolt, Right: 3 bolt. Notice how the one on the left has a chunkier sole. The two-bolt option is used for SPD which are popular with MTB, commuting and touring cyclists. I use 2-bolt SPD shoes on my audax bike because I'm able to ...


7

Look Keo 2 and Look Keo are Look's current/previous range and they are compatible with each other. Look Delta are Look's earlier range. I'm afraid they are not compatible with Keo's or Keo 2's SPD-SL are Shimano's version of road pedals. These aren't compatible with Look products, (neither therefore are Look products compatible with them). Checking out ...


7

It's definitely possible that the bottom bracket height is lower than your previous bike and/or your crankarm length is longer. The BB could be lower to improve handling and I have definitely seen longer crankarms on large bikes. A typical measurement is 175cm but you could see 170 on a small frame or 180 on a larger frame. The longer crankarm would be ...


6

If you're never walking on the cleats and can track-stand at junctions and traffic lights they should almost never wear out. There is minimal wear clipping in and out. The reds are 9 degrees of float before unclipping which may increase the wear though. I use the black cleats (0 degrees) and I wear out the bottom of the cleats through walking and ...


6

First, note that if you're new to clip/clipless systems, it takes a while to get used to it. A lot of non-racers prefer mountain bike clipless pedals (e.g. Shimano SPD) since you can clip in on both sides of the pedal and the shoes often allow the cleats to be recessed (so you can walk around). Mountain marketed shoes generally tend to be more comfortable ...


6

There are bearings inside the pedal that are meant to keep things running smoothly. If it was just the pedal itself around a metal shaft, then things would probably wear out quite quickly. Some pedals are serviceable, while others are meant to be replaced completely. If you are sure that the snaps is coming from inside the pedal, and not from inside the ...


5

Shimano make several models of pedals with SPD one side, and flat on the other. So they can be used with SPD shoes or normal shoes. Options include: PD-A530 These are designed for road/touring bikes, so are fairly slim, with a small metal platform. (Not to be confused with the PD-A520, which are one-sided SPD pedals, without a flat platform). Personally ...


5

For a ready made part, see Fly Pedals. This is essentially just a metal platform, which you bolt cleats onto, then clip them into your pedals. They are threaded with holes for 2-bolt or 3-bolt cleats, so should work with most mountain bike or road bike clipless pedals (including SPD-SL). Note these are not yet available, but you can pre-order them from the ...


5

You will spend far more $$ on welding supplies than the cost of a new crank arm. The crank arm is an aluminum alloy and the pedal shaft is a tool grade steel alloy. You can replace both for the cost of just the gas to attempt brazing the two metals. You'll also have to be really good at brazing not to completely destroy the aluminum crank arm in the ...


5

Yes there are lots of different options with pedals (it's a bit easier with shoes), but they can be summarised quite briefly. Types of pedals: Flat - a standard pedal on many bikes Flat pedal with toe clips. So you can still use any shoe, but the toe clip holds your shoe in place on the pedal. "Clipless" pedals - where both pedal and shoe have a some kind ...


5

A lot of causal riders appear to prefer SPD's, which is a great place to start, but I here is the argument for SPD-SL like systems. Which I personally prefer and even on dirty muddy roads. Road bike specific pedals (e.g., SPD-SL) are designed for a single purpose, road cycling, and the pedals do this job well. Road cycling has a lot of repetitive motions ...


4

It depends on your welding set-up and experience, but I wouldn't bother. Assuming the threads still engage a little bit, I'd get some hardcore epoxy resin (the sort that's specially designed for metal-on-metal; it often contains iron filings). Stuff the crank eye with it and screw the pedal in as far as it goes. Once it's gone off if should be good enough ...


4

Generally speaking, when a pedal works its way loose and is ridden for a decent amount of time, it does strip (and thus ruin) the crank arm. The only way you can be sure that the crank arm is good is to inspect it. So I'd guess your crank arm is damaged (especially if its at the point where you can't loosen the pedal). A picture of how its bent in would be ...


4

Mavic pedals are ATAC (see also the cleat page). They were developed by TIME and just rebranded by Mavic. So, I'd expect that they're compatible.


4

Those look like Shimano mountain SPD PD-M545 pedals: Looks like a pretty good match to the picture on the Shimano site, but if you don't see a Shimano logo on them, they could be third party compatible pedals. The cleats look like this: I'm not aware of a guide that compares all pedal styles, but there are not that many pedal types in common use and ...


3

Drop the chain and try to rotate cranks. If "skip" feels then I would look into BB. If not, then pretty much sounds like kink in the chain which is very possible on very new or very old chains. Very new chains can be over-pressurised while installing and therefore one link connection is just not flexible enough which makes it "skip" when going through the ...


3

Either a helicoil or a replacement crank arm (or set) is a better choice. You local bike shop might have some compatible used cranksets they'd sell for cheap. Or look for some on your local internet flea market. The shops are getting in old bikes as trade ins all the time and might use the parts off those bikes for this kind of job. I'd replace the ...


3

Welding the pedal to the crank should NEVER be done. Pedal threads are oriented such that in the event of a pedal bearings becoming jammed the pedals will unscrew from the cranks rather than injure the rider. Severe injury is possible if the pedal jams while pedaling at a fast cadence or on a bike that does not have a freewheel or freehub body (e.g. fixed ...


3

If you don't find any factory made component, you can always get down the do-it-yourself route. Here is a link to set of instructions on how to make ones for Shimano PD 520/540: http://www.instructables.com/id/Pedal-platforms-for-Shimano-PD-520540/ The basic idea of it is to get hold of an extra pair of cleats, affix them with appropriate bolts to a ...


3

There are many factors to consider. Without being able to be scientific about it, people do evolve a natural pedal technique and I don't see the point in trying to radically change it, rather you should first have your bike fit and set up performed properly, and then allow your own natural style to evolve. There have been major cycling champions that were ...


3

If You are DH racing, then we are talking about racetracks and trails thar are known to the rider, assuming that the rider is practicing and getting used to the track, picking best lines for each section and generally speaking, creating/refining a race strategy. In that context, a gear is to be selected acording to the particular needs of each section, ...


3

The threads are completely stuffed. Do not just screw the pedals back in and do not rely on loctite or similar compounds. Pedals falling off is at best inconvenient, at worst can lead to crash and serious injury. Easiest option is to replace the cranks. Its not a big job but parts cost might mean a repair is a better option for you. The bottom bracket will ...


2

TL;DR : Having a quality pedal means that it will always be in the same position when you need to clip in and will make you life much easier when starting. Part of the problem might be the "cheapness" of the pedals, let me explain : I ride look and have been using Look Keo Carbon pedals, they are middle range (more expensive than the Easy and less than ...


2

I use these spd's: http://road.cc/content/review/43776-shimano-pd-m520-spd-pedal They are double sided, so you never get the wrong side to clip in They are cheap They are durable The shoes you buy with them usually allow (easyish) walking when required Can buy both road & mountain biking shoes - with a single pedal type I know that's more of a ...


2

I think the key to your problem is the asymmetrical nature of SPD-SL pedals. So I don't think the Look pedals will help you. Look at symmetrical pedals, such SpeedPlay, Crank Brothers Egg Beaters, SPDs and the Time Atac range. This style of pedal is much easier to clip into because you can just mash your foot at the pedal. Have a look at this answer for ...


2

I've had something similar (but more dramatic) happen and I lost the crank arm. It seems to be made of softer medal, luckily, than the pedal, which was absolutely fine and I still use. Crank arms are pretty cheap when compared to pedals anyway. The damage may all be to the crank arm. I agree with Batman, the crank arms is probably a write-off. But it's ...


2

Heating the pedal is not going to help here. Cool the pedal might. But if the hex is stripped too late. Use penetrating oil like Liquid Wrench over WD40 for this. I would have soaked it two days in penetrating oil before I went brute force. The risk of brute force is you that you strip out the crank. Use a drill press as it is really hard to center ...



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