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20

Higher-end bikes are expected to be used with clipless pedals. However, there are several different standards for these pedals, and all of which have a different type of cleat that fits in them. Most cyclists tend to stick with one of these standards across all of their bikes, so they don't have to have multiple sets of shoes. Thus higher-end bicycles ...


14

Flat pedals are great for lots of reasons, but I won't get into the virtues or pitfalls of platforms versus toe clips versus clipless systems (though I am a big fan of plain old platform pedals.) I will try to give information pertaining to the different styles and a few examples rather than an exhaustive list of specific brands and prices. There are lots ...


9

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


8

Flat pedal specific shoes usually have a special rubber compound, such as Five Ten's sticky rubber or Shimano (and others) Vibram sole (used in hiking shoes as well). The goal of these special rubber compounds is to better stick to the pins of the pedals and are therefore usually softer so as to get a good grip on them. My personal experience with skate ...


7

I used to ride with skate shoes for a year and it was not good. I didn't know it. Generally skate shoes: bend more than MTB shoes so they'll not transfer all of your energy on the pedals do not have sticky soles so riding on rough trails may be harder and more dangerous due to the feet constantly changing position on the pedals Regarding non racing ...


7

This is a mindfulness technique rather than a product, but when riding on flat pedals I consciously focus on keeping the balls of my feet over the pedal spindles. (I also resist the temptation, every time I see someone pushing flat pedals with their heels, to yell out "You're doing it wrong!")


6

I'm wondering, if anyone have ever faced with same issue when starts to use cleats. What changes can you suggest trying to alleviate the problems I have described? After I first started using cleats, I started to developed knee pain. I asked about that here: you may like some of the answers. I discovered that in my case, the cause was the placement of ...


6

To answer your question directly, you certainly can use clipless over long distances. However, scientific studies have actually shown that clipless pedals offer no discernible performance advantages over long distances. They have shown that a small advantage can be gained on sprints, but that's about it. That said, many cyclists do report increased ...


6

You can get parts to fix this, like the helicoil that work by cutting a new, larger thread into the crank then adding a spacer to bring it back to the correct size. They parts are relatively cheap, but the tool to cut the new thread is expensive. Which means that if you can find a bike shop with the tools it's going to cost quite a bit to have them do the ...


5

Firstly the "uncomfortable feeling in my knees" needs to be addressed and are a concern. You don't say how much and how long your rides are, but its warning that should not be ignored, more so if your rides are short (under about 2 hours). What cadence are you riding at. With knee discomfort and being used to pedals in the middle of the feet, my guess is ...


5

No, pedaling while standing will not cause a properly installed pedal to come off. However, if a pedal comes off, it not particularly desirable to be standing. As far as weight distribution, putting all your weight on one pedal for extended periods will not hurt you bike or cause things to go wrong with the bike.


5

A short length of foam pipe insulation should do the job. It's cheap, will fit into your pocket, and you can get it at any hardware store or plumbing supply shop. You could also slide it onto your top, down, or seat tube for storage. It looks like this: Choose the size based on the type of pedals you use. Platform pedals will require a larger diameter ...


5

A lot of platform pedals are made of plastics which won't scratch things, like this one. They're pretty much available everywhere for about 10 dollars, though a clear one will pretty much just transfer dirt if it hits. You can also put some duct tape or electrical tape or something over the edges of the pedal (this should essentially be free). Note that ...


4

I have seen people succesfully filling the the whole space of the crank thread with weld, then re-manufacturing the thread in a turning/lathing shop. I have done this to a bent/stripped derailer hanger of a steel frame, and it worked perfectly. I think you could weight price, availability and safety of each alternative, but very probable that replacing the ...


4

I ride flats for everything: city, XC, DH, DJ. Depending on what you want to do you can move your feet appropriately. I find that for XC and commuting types of riding moving my feet back so the balls of my feet are slightly forward of the axle/spindle gives me the best power transfer. If I want more stability I move my feet forward so the arch of my foot is ...


4

I've ridden commuter and road racing bikes both for decades and can validate your decision to go specific in regards to your shoe/pedal setup. Start with the shoes - try a bunch on and find a pair that really fit well and seem to work for you. Most modern shoe/pedal systems use the three bolt pattern common to Shimano and Look systems so there's not a lot ...


4

Aside from what the others have said here (with details on how to use clipless pedals), your original question was can you ride long distances in them. That is one of the things they are designed for. By keeping your foot exactly placed on the pedal, they maximize your pedaling efficiency. You foot never falls off the pedal. I rode over 3,000 miles last ...


4

Five Ten Freerider VXi Elements - 398 gram Five Ten Freerider - 399 gram Giro Jacket - 416 gram Shimano AM41 - 420 gram Teva Links - 440 gram 661 Filter - 680 Gram So basically, all the available (excluding high-top shoes) flat pedal shoes weigh the same. You could theoretically shave 1 gram by switching to the Freerider VXi Elements, but that would ...


3

In my experience, my knee pain was always fixed by sliding forward the seat (this kind of alignment). In general, I would check your setup with someone experienced and reliable because there might be a lot of variables involved in this kind of aches. I think most of the problems you're having are due to being used to pedaling with the arch of the foot. Your ...


3

If the crank arm is wide enough it may be drilled and a thread repair insert installed or tapped to a larger size. This is best left to your local bike shop. To buy the tools that you will most likely only use once will exceed the labor fee they will charge. They can also check to make sure the repair can be done safely.


3

The only time I've seen pedals in a newish bike strip out of the crank was when the mechanic who assembled the bike overtightens the pedals (the mechanic was a younger me, but you live and you learn.) Often, people will forget that left pedals are left-hand threaded and will strip them out when they try to remove them. The mechanical motion of pedaling ...


3

I own plenty skate shoes from Vans and ipath. I have tried riding in them and they don't feel any better than an average sneaker. I switched to riding flat pedals about over a year ago and tried my first pair of Five Ten's Free Rider!! Holy wow!! They have a stealth rubber sole that is torsionally stiff giving you solid platform for an efficient downward ...


3

Skate shoes are typically very flexible and this is terrible for cycling shoes! Pick up a typical skate shoe and then try to bend it in half. I have a pair that I can almost entirely bend in half. Now go to a local bike shop and try to bend a road shoe in half. You can't. All of that flex is just wasted energy. With a stiff sole your energy gets ...


3

I feel fastest with clipless pedals. But you are not alone. http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Which-Muscles-are-Really-Used-During-the-Pedal-Stroke-2012.html I prefer to ride with older style strap in pedals because I like to walk normally when I get somewhere. Also your shoes may not be adjusted to your pedals properly.


3

There could be several possible reasons for this behaviour - Derailleur could be out of adjustment - can be fixed by barrel adjuster/adjusting the tautness of the shifter cable. You can shift into a cog in the middle of range and visually inspect if derailleur is in line vertically under the cog that chain rests on. When derailleur is properly adjusted, ...


3

FWIW, you can get high end MTB shoes that are just as stiff as road shoes and only a bit heavier. ( Many high end MTB shoes are just the same as the road model with a different hole drilling and more outsole stuff glued on. ) One example is NorthWave: MTB shoe: http://www.northwave.com/it/catalog/scarpe/mtb/11 Road shoe: ...


3

In the shortest way of answering this, yes, they will be suitable for trail/xc use. All flat pedals are relatively the same. They only differ in the amount of pins, contact area, weight and their thickness. You'll want something on the thin side for trail use, as you'll be pedaling quite a bit more than if you were on a downhill bike. This will help to ...


3

To sum up all the comment answers, which provide you with a wealth of options: The backwards bike Retro-direct gearing The Tri Via gearing system Some parts of these look rather easy to fabricate such as the idler arms or connecting two forks together. The rear hub is going to be the most difficult part since you have to build two sets of engagement ...


3

You can absolutely ride long distances in clipless pedals. There are countless examples of this - at the extreme, look at any picture of a Race Across America participant, there is a very strong chance are they will be using clipless pedals of some kind (RAAM being a 4800km race, completed solo in less than 8 days by the winners..) Clipless pedals are ...


3

Cleats are the bottom attachment to shoes. Most road shoes use a 3 hole attachment, which is a standard size. Most pedal manufacturers have their own cleat style, but all 3-hole cleats use the same spacing as far as I know. Your pedals may come with suitable cleats if you're buying them new, if not make sure you buy 'look keo' compatible cleats. There is ...



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