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15

This sounds like a issue in your freehub/freewheel (both are mechanically the same for this question). This is what allows you to coast without pedaling. Inside these bodies are a set of "pawls" which will flip down and engage a series of splines when rotated "forward", and propels the bike forward. Then, if you move them in the other direction ...


9

I'd wager the two biggest reasons you don't see foot-sized pedals are the increased rotational weight, and the difficulty you would have catching the pedal with your foot before it struck the ground or the front tire. I'm sure someone tried this once and promptly scrapped the idea after the foot-sized pedal struck something. Pedals need to be stiff and ...


8

Well, there are a ton of adjustments you can make, but sometimes a bike just won't fit someone. You may want to look up "bike fit", though this is something you probably should have done before you bought the bike. You can: Move the saddle backwards Move the saddle up/down Change the angle of the saddle Change the stem height Change the stem (to get a ...


7

It's definitely possible that the bottom bracket height is lower than your previous bike and/or your crankarm length is longer. The BB could be lower to improve handling and I have definitely seen longer crankarms on large bikes. A typical measurement is 175cm but you could see 170 on a small frame or 180 on a larger frame. The longer crankarm would be ...


7

There are bearings inside the pedal that are meant to keep things running smoothly. If it was just the pedal itself around a metal shaft, then things would probably wear out quite quickly. Some pedals are serviceable, while others are meant to be replaced completely. If you are sure that the snaps is coming from inside the pedal, and not from inside the ...


6

Most likely duplicate but I cannot find it. In the free hub / free wheel you have pawls that are the coast / drive mechanism. Most likely they are gooked up or just plain broken. Some are serviceable and some are not. FREEHUB SERVICE You can also search on youtube. Or just take the wheel to a bike shop. You might be able to free it up with a bit of ...


5

The Click'R system allows for a more recessed cleat in the shoe. It is a very similar design to Shimano SPD but is marketed for commuters and trekkers who want dual purpose shoes for when they are on and off the bike. They also allow for multi-release meaning they offer a wider range of movement to release the cleat from the pedal making them easier to use. ...


4

Another option to that new system is the existing SPD system with the "Multi-Directional" cleat (SM-SH56). This cleat just makes the step-in and release a little easier than the standard cleat (no numbers on it). The advantage (over the Click'R) is that it's using the tried-and-true SPD system, and when you get comfortable with that cleat, you can replace ...


4

You can try to helicoil the crankset. This is an insert which can be used to repair threading, though you need some special tools to do it. Your bike shop may or may not have this as an option. They may charge you as much as dropping in a new SRAM S100 crankset for this. The crankset uses a Powerspline BB (which means if you to keep the BB, you're going to ...


4

Something is dragging as you pedal harder. The most likely thing is that your rear wheel is moving so that the tire drags against the chain stay when you apply power. This is something that you'll probably need to troubleshoot when you're riding because it isn't likely to show up with the bike on a work stand. You might be able to make it happen by applying ...


4

The FSA Warranty is 2 years on cranksets. I would still contact them to see what they recommend.They might be able to repair, recommend a company who can repair or offer you a lower-cost replacement. You didn't say which crank arm it is but they may also be able to provide a replacement for just that crank arm. I would also stop using the crank for now for ...


4

If the instructions that come with the pedals tell you to use the washers with carbon cranks then you should do it. The reason for the washers is that that they keep the axle from rubbing against the crank and thus damaging the carbon when tightening the pedals.Oh yes, and you can compensate the thickness of the washers by moving each cleat 0.5mm outside.


4

What I'm guessing is happening is that your reaction arm (the thing on the left of the diagram) is not fixed in place. When you brake the shoes of the brake are pushed out from the axle into the shell of the wheel hub. The idea being that the axle is fixed in place and the shoes drag against the shell. If the reaction arm was undone, the friction of the ...


3

One big difference is where the force is applied. In a conventional pedal, you press down using the ball of you foot. In a foot-long pedal you would have to center the axle so the pedal stays level, but that would mean that the force would be applied by the middle of your foot. You would be losing the power and flexibility that your ankle can bring. Being ...


3

It’s probably more a matter of pedal systems than shoes. High end shoes in both categories will be pretty good and stiff. I can only talk about Speedplay Zero (road bike pedals) vs. Look Quartz and Shimano SPD. The Speedplay Zero have a much greater area, have completly free adjustable movement sideways (as far as the crankarms allow it) and no play, ...


3

You need a large allen key, often an 8mm to tighten that centre bolt right down. It'll pull the crank arm onto the spindle and secure it. The LH-FSA-AL ring is the self extracting bolt, the internal hex bolt pushes on the back of it to pull the crank off without extra tools. That has a left hand thread so that it doesn't unscrew as the internal bolt ...


3

With the cleats of the Shimano SPD MTB style pedals the side float* is +/-3° and system inherent. Nothing else is available. There are however two different types of cleats: One type will only release with a horizontal motion (SH-51), the other also with a vertical movement or combined vertical horizontal movement SH-56). Bikeradar has a description of the ...


3

Here's a quick, safe, and easy way to loosen and remove stubborn pedals: In short, you'll need a wrench, and will have use your heel to push it. The trick is in setting the right angle between the wrench and the rocker. Just in case this video is no longer available, here are some key steps from it:


3

My guess is that your rear end is flexing and either: Rear rim is touching the brake pad, or Tire is rubbing the chainstay With the former, try checking your wheel alignment and loosing your brakes a bit (safely) and testing. With the latter, look for tire rub marks in your chainstay area where the chainstay meets the bottom bracket.


3

I always say to myself "back off" - as both pedals unscrew towards the back which helps me remember which way to turn.


2

PeteH has implied it, but sounds like something has gone drastically wrong in a bearing somewhere. I'd suggest you remove the chain from the front chainring and try to spin the pedal crank. It should turn easily, with no side-to-side slop. If not, check the rear wheel for the same, it should not feel gritty or notchy, and should not have sideways ...


2

I went from flats to half-toe clips, which had no noticeable impact. I changed back to flats after an accident where the toe clip was upside down and snagged on something. Plus I found it fiddly to clip-in/hook-on at the lights. So back to flats... and the differences became clear. You stay on the pedal a lot better - I noticed that a bad gear change or ...


2

Three options - or combination coast through the turn with pedals horizontal to the ground more narrow pedal shorter crank arm


2

I doubt it is the pedal. If the pedal bearings were going out it would not be in just one position. Bit still start with eliminating the pedals as it is easy. If you have a spare set of pedal try them or take pedals from another bike. To really be sure put the bad pedals on another bike and test. More likely the crank is loose or the crank bearing ...


2

I did find these http://www.yellowjersey.org/tocleat.html And Yellow Jersey is exactly the kind of shop you'd expect to find that stuff. The one in the image is for Road shoes, but I think could easily be adapted to SPD shoes with some work with a dremel tool. They say they will make a custom cleat for just about any shoe. You do realize that ...


2

Either the seller meant clipped pedal-as in you could bolt toe clips to it-or he didn't know what he was talking about. Those are not clipless pedals. They are VP road pedals that have an integrated toeclip:


2

Would you consider clipless pedals instead of clipped platform? This is probably the most turning clearance for the dollar, second to replacing the crank arms with shorter ones. A set of these pedals will improve your power output as you can pull harder on the upstrokes, as well as shaving probably ~1" or more off your pedal clearance. One downside is ...


2

As you have observed, to get good traction for flats (especially in the wet) the pedals have to be grippy. To be able to rotate to enable the release of clipless shoes, the flats have to be slippery. Making the pedals grippy will mean unreliable release when using clipless. Whatever you do, do not try to fix it with DIY solutions such as grip tape, ...


2

Surprised there are not more studies on efficiency of clipless. The original question was to seek a scientific answer, not anecdotal, although many feel clipless gives more, this is subjective if not backed by science. This is the only article I found: ...


2

You have a loose bottom bracket. It needs to be replaced. You need to buy a new bottom bracket, along with two special tools: A crank puller and a bottom-bracket tool. If your current bottom-bracket is cup-and-cone style (I'm betting it is), it can be removed with basic tools and elbow grease. If it's cartridge style, it can be removed with the BB tool. ...



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