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9

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


8

This is part comment, part answer, but too long to fit in a comment, so here we go. Personally, I use SPD, and when I ride with a group, everyone else has SPD-SL or LOOK. I'm usually clipped in and across the intersection before they're clipped in. Either I'm just really good at clipping in, or SPD are designed to be easier to get clipped in to. Even the ...


8

I think most people find the bike-to-run transition quite difficult while the legs adjust from going in a circular motion to running. Particularly for longer distance courses. Here's an interesting article from a renowned triathlon athlete/coach: http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2007/01/cleat-position.html The article discusses the merits of putting ...


7

A lot of platform pedals are made of plastics which won't scratch things, like this one. They're pretty much available everywhere for about 10 dollars, though a clear one will pretty much just transfer dirt if it hits. You can also put some duct tape or electrical tape or something over the edges of the pedal (this should essentially be free). Note that ...


7

A short length of foam pipe insulation should do the job. It's cheap, will fit into your pocket, and you can get it at any hardware store or plumbing supply shop. You could also slide it onto your top, down, or seat tube for storage. It looks like this: Choose the size based on the type of pedals you use. Platform pedals will require a larger diameter ...


7

Look Keo 2 and Look Keo are Look's current/previous range and they are compatible with each other. Look Delta are Look's earlier range. I'm afraid they are not compatible with Keo's or Keo 2's SPD-SL are Shimano's version of road pedals. These aren't compatible with Look products, (neither therefore are Look products compatible with them). Checking out ...


7

Assuming that you're talking about cleats on your shoes, there are three main attachment systems. Left: 2-bolt, Middle: 2 or 3 bolt, Right: 3 bolt. Notice how the one on the left has a chunkier sole. The two-bolt option is used for SPD which are popular with MTB, commuting and touring cyclists. I use 2-bolt SPD shoes on my audax bike because I'm able to ...


6

You can get parts to fix this, like the helicoil that work by cutting a new, larger thread into the crank then adding a spacer to bring it back to the correct size. They parts are relatively cheap, but the tool to cut the new thread is expensive. Which means that if you can find a bike shop with the tools it's going to cost quite a bit to have them do the ...


6

To answer your question directly, you certainly can use clipless over long distances. However, scientific studies have actually shown that clipless pedals offer no discernible performance advantages over long distances. They have shown that a small advantage can be gained on sprints, but that's about it. That said, many cyclists do report increased ...


6

If you're never walking on the cleats and can track-stand at junctions and traffic lights they should almost never wear out. There is minimal wear clipping in and out. The reds are 9 degrees of float before unclipping which may increase the wear though. I use the black cleats (0 degrees) and I wear out the bottom of the cleats through walking and ...


5

Shimano make several models of pedals with SPD one side, and flat on the other. So they can be used with SPD shoes or normal shoes. Options include: PD-A530 These are designed for road/touring bikes, so are fairly slim, with a small metal platform. (Not to be confused with the PD-A520, which are one-sided SPD pedals, without a flat platform). Personally ...


5

For a ready made part, see Fly Pedals. This is essentially just a metal platform, which you bolt cleats onto, then clip them into your pedals. They are threaded with holes for 2-bolt or 3-bolt cleats, so should work with most mountain bike or road bike clipless pedals (including SPD-SL). Note these are not yet available, but you can pre-order them from the ...


5

You will spend far more $$ on welding supplies than the cost of a new crank arm. The crank arm is an aluminum alloy and the pedal shaft is a tool grade steel alloy. You can replace both for the cost of just the gas to attempt brazing the two metals. You'll also have to be really good at brazing not to completely destroy the aluminum crank arm in the ...


5

Welding aluminum and steel is not a DIY skill - read This. If you must repair rather than replace, a helicoil is the correct way to address the problem. A crank would be cheaper than the coil alone, let alone the time to fix it. Chemical bonding (AKA. Glue) is probably the only DIY solution. The issue I see is that when a pedal comes off while riding, it ...


5

Yes there are lots of different options with pedals (it's a bit easier with shoes), but they can be summarised quite briefly. Types of pedals: Flat - a standard pedal on many bikes Flat pedal with toe clips. So you can still use any shoe, but the toe clip holds your shoe in place on the pedal. "Clipless" pedals - where both pedal and shoe have a some kind ...


4

Aside from what the others have said here (with details on how to use clipless pedals), your original question was can you ride long distances in them. That is one of the things they are designed for. By keeping your foot exactly placed on the pedal, they maximize your pedaling efficiency. You foot never falls off the pedal. I rode over 3,000 miles last ...


4

The best way is to practice, practice, practice! Do it enough times and it'll become second nature. When I was first starting with my road pedals (Keos, but they're pretty similar) I would push my shin against them after setting off to steady them before trying to clip in.


4

To sum up all the comment answers, which provide you with a wealth of options: The backwards bike Retro-direct gearing The Tri Via gearing system Some parts of these look rather easy to fabricate such as the idler arms or connecting two forks together. The rear hub is going to be the most difficult part since you have to build two sets of engagement ...


4

I've ridden commuter and road racing bikes both for decades and can validate your decision to go specific in regards to your shoe/pedal setup. Start with the shoes - try a bunch on and find a pair that really fit well and seem to work for you. Most modern shoe/pedal systems use the three bolt pattern common to Shimano and Look systems so there's not a lot ...


4

I doubt you will find a way to do this; it would require a shoe with a pretty deep sole to recess the cleats into (that's what SPDs do). Note that the SPD-SLs are pretty similar to the Looks but much more walkable.


4

Five Ten Freerider VXi Elements - 398 gram Five Ten Freerider - 399 gram Giro Jacket - 416 gram Shimano AM41 - 420 gram Teva Links - 440 gram 661 Filter - 680 Gram So basically, all the available (excluding high-top shoes) flat pedal shoes weigh the same. You could theoretically shave 1 gram by switching to the Freerider VXi Elements, but that would ...


4

It depends on your welding set-up and experience, but I wouldn't bother. Assuming the threads still engage a little bit, I'd get some hardcore epoxy resin (the sort that's specially designed for metal-on-metal; it often contains iron filings). Stuff the crank eye with it and screw the pedal in as far as it goes. Once it's gone off if should be good enough ...


4

Welding the pedal to the crank should NEVER be done. Pedal threads are oriented such that in the event of a pedal bearings becoming jammed the pedals will unscrew from the cranks rather than injure the rider. Severe injury is possible if the pedal jams while pedaling at a fast cadence or on a bike that does not have a freewheel or freehub body (e.g. fixed ...


4

Generally speaking, when a pedal works its way loose and is ridden for a decent amount of time, it does strip (and thus ruin) the crank arm. The only way you can be sure that the crank arm is good is to inspect it. So I'd guess your crank arm is damaged (especially if its at the point where you can't loosen the pedal). A picture of how its bent in would be ...


4

Mavic pedals are ATAC (see also the cleat page). They were developed by TIME and just rebranded by Mavic. So, I'd expect that they're compatible.


3

You can absolutely ride long distances in clipless pedals. There are countless examples of this - at the extreme, look at any picture of a Race Across America participant, there is a very strong chance are they will be using clipless pedals of some kind (RAAM being a 4800km race, completed solo in less than 8 days by the winners..) Clipless pedals are ...


3

This sounds like there's a problem with your rear hub's freehub body (assuming you're running a cassette). The pawls get messed up sometimes and cause a jump when you're pedaling. If this is the case, you can try to replace the freehub body, which requires a bit of work. You basically have to take the axle out of the hub and get a 10mm wrench down there ...


3

Cleats are the bottom attachment to shoes. Most road shoes use a 3 hole attachment, which is a standard size. Most pedal manufacturers have their own cleat style, but all 3-hole cleats use the same spacing as far as I know. Your pedals may come with suitable cleats if you're buying them new, if not make sure you buy 'look keo' compatible cleats. There is ...


3

There could be several possible reasons for this behaviour - Derailleur could be out of adjustment - can be fixed by barrel adjuster/adjusting the tautness of the shifter cable. You can shift into a cog in the middle of range and visually inspect if derailleur is in line vertically under the cog that chain rests on. When derailleur is properly adjusted, ...


3

In the shortest way of answering this, yes, they will be suitable for trail/xc use. All flat pedals are relatively the same. They only differ in the amount of pins, contact area, weight and their thickness. You'll want something on the thin side for trail use, as you'll be pedaling quite a bit more than if you were on a downhill bike. This will help to ...



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