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1

Either a helicoil or a replacement crank arm (or set) is a better choice. You local bike shop might have some compatible used cranksets they'd sell for cheap. Or look for some on your local internet flea market. The shops are getting in old bikes as trade ins all the time and might use the parts off those bikes for this kind of job. I'd replace the ...


4

Welding the pedal to the crank should NEVER be done. Pedal threads are oriented such that in the event of a pedal bearings becoming jammed the pedals will unscrew from the cranks rather than injure the rider. Severe injury is possible if the pedal jams while pedaling at a fast cadence or on a bike that does not have a freewheel or freehub body (e.g. fixed ...


5

Welding aluminum and steel is not a DIY skill - read This. If you must repair rather than replace, a helicoil is the correct way to address the problem. A crank would be cheaper than the coil alone, let alone the time to fix it. Chemical bonding (AKA. Glue) is probably the only DIY solution. The issue I see is that when a pedal comes off while riding, it ...


5

You will spend far more $$ on welding supplies than the cost of a new crank arm. The crank arm is an aluminum alloy and the pedal shaft is a tool grade steel alloy. You can replace both for the cost of just the gas to attempt brazing the two metals. You'll also have to be really good at brazing not to completely destroy the aluminum crank arm in the ...


4

It depends on your welding set-up and experience, but I wouldn't bother. Assuming the threads still engage a little bit, I'd get some hardcore epoxy resin (the sort that's specially designed for metal-on-metal; it often contains iron filings). Stuff the crank eye with it and screw the pedal in as far as it goes. Once it's gone off if should be good enough ...


5

For a ready made part, see Fly Pedals. This is essentially just a metal platform, which you bolt cleats onto, then clip them into your pedals. They are threaded with holes for 2-bolt or 3-bolt cleats, so should work with most mountain bike or road bike clipless pedals (including SPD-SL). Note these are not yet available, but you can pre-order them from the ...


3

If you don't find any factory made component, you can always get down the do-it-yourself route. Here is a link to set of instructions on how to make ones for Shimano PD 520/540: http://www.instructables.com/id/Pedal-platforms-for-Shimano-PD-520540/ The basic idea of it is to get hold of an extra pair of cleats, affix them with appropriate bolts to a ...


0

Turns out this is not the correct style (question is for SL) This is the Shimano part number SHIMANO SM-PD20 I have some and they are a pain. The are hard to insert and remove and you have to spin the pedal to get the correct side up. I would rather swap out pedals. This is a reflector but not sure if it is meant to step on reflector insert


2

TL;DR : Having a quality pedal means that it will always be in the same position when you need to clip in and will make you life much easier when starting. Part of the problem might be the "cheapness" of the pedals, let me explain : I ride look and have been using Look Keo Carbon pedals, they are middle range (more expensive than the Easy and less than ...


1

I use these spd's: http://road.cc/content/review/43776-shimano-pd-m520-spd-pedal They are double sided, so you never get the wrong side to clip in They are cheap They are durable The shoes you buy with them usually allow (easyish) walking when required Can buy both road & mountain biking shoes - with a single pedal type I know that's more of a ...


2

I think the key to your problem is the asymmetrical nature of SPD-SL pedals. So I don't think the Look pedals will help you. Look at symmetrical pedals, such SpeedPlay, Crank Brothers Egg Beaters, SPDs and the Time Atac range. This style of pedal is much easier to clip into because you can just mash your foot at the pedal. Have a look at this answer for ...


8

This is part comment, part answer, but too long to fit in a comment, so here we go. Personally, I use SPD, and when I ride with a group, everyone else has SPD-SL or LOOK. I'm usually clipped in and across the intersection before they're clipped in. Either I'm just really good at clipping in, or SPD are designed to be easier to get clipped in to. Even the ...


0

There could be a couple different issues at work, but it's most likely that the bearings need to be re-greased and/or tightened. On some pedals, that little screw simply holds the pedal body together and the amount of grease in the bearing area will determine how tight the whole assembly holds together. On the other hand, some pedals have a preload that ...


0

Actually the Look Delta are the oldest LOOK System i could buy in any shop. None of the shop owners/employees knew any other older system before keo. And the Deltas worked for all the old LOOK Pedals i had (i have 6 different old LOOK Pedals). Took them for a tiny spin (~40km) and had no problems whatsoever. Update: Got an E-Mail from a brand manager for ...


1

Another vote for the PD-A530. In my case I have these on the hybrid and PD-A520's on the Cannondale road bike. Both pairs are adjusted so that they feel the same so the muscle memory on both bikes is the same. In a panic stop, I don't want to have to remember which bike I am on to get out of it. Tom


5

Shimano make several models of pedals with SPD one side, and flat on the other. So they can be used with SPD shoes or normal shoes. Options include: PD-A530 These are designed for road/touring bikes, so are fairly slim, with a small metal platform. (Not to be confused with the PD-A520, which are one-sided SPD pedals, without a flat platform). Personally ...


7

Look Keo 2 and Look Keo are Look's current/previous range and they are compatible with each other. Look Delta are Look's earlier range. I'm afraid they are not compatible with Keo's or Keo 2's SPD-SL are Shimano's version of road pedals. These aren't compatible with Look products, (neither therefore are Look products compatible with them). Checking out ...


0

I would check the bull bearing for wear or lost balls. I had the same feeling once, and it was the bull bearing which cause this.



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