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3

Clipless pedals are a matter of preference - you don't have to use them. There are alternatives such as "half clips" which might suit you better. I've come to like mine, with mtb shoes and pedals that are designed to be rideable with clipless or normal shoes on either side. These allow you to ride in an alternative position (with the pedal under the arch ...


1

Keeping your feet in one position is important when you want to use all your power to pedal in the most efficient way, or you want your feet to be stable on the pedals, because you tackle some hard stuff and your feet tend to move from their position without you wanting it. For you, you use your bike for commuting, which means you have to swing around to ...


13

Yes, I've used a variety of folding pedals on my Dahon and Brompton and they're all a bit flexy. I've had plastic ones snap in half on me (and yes, that can be very painful/dangerous). The best ones I've had were all-metal ones in which the axle and folding pedal were both metal. But even those aren't as strong as fixed pedals -- and none of the folding ...


0

Devil's advocate here, but why not try using flat pedals on your spin classes? It would teach you correct technique by spinning in "circles". But anyway, the previous answers have hit it right on the head, it is either you are using a multi-release cleat or the tension in the pedals are too low or that you are "jerky" in your pedalling movements. remember,...


2

@Batman has already explained how to adjust SPD release tension (+1 to him). Pedalling smoother will also help. Try to use you ankles more, so that you are trying to drive the pedals through all 360°. And try to pedal straight, as in keep your feet pointed directly forward all the time. Keeping your knees straight can help with this, and focussing on a ...


7

On Shimano SPD pedals, you can sometimes adjust the tension for how tightly they clip in (likely via a hex bolt). If the tension is too low, your feet will be too easy to pop out, whereas if its too high, you won't easily be able to get out (which isn't a problem on an indoor cycling setup). Try playing with this setting to see if you stay clipped in (...


2

Generally you can squirt some liquid lube in the pedal axle and it eventually wicks its way to the bearings on the inside. However this won't do much for bearings on the outside end of the axle. Some pedals can be disassembled for servicing and ball replacement, depends totally on what your pedals look like. We can tell you more if you post a clear sharp ...


0

it looks to me like the cage part of the pedal is pressed together you may be able to remove the pedal and pound the end of the cage part back into the frame of the pedal thee type of connections are held together by distortion of the metal ie widening of the end of the piece to be held by widening by pressure like a rivet so possibly u could re hammer them ...



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