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1

Assuming that the shoe is still attached to the cleat.... Can you not just keep turning the shoe to a wider and wider angle until it forces the cleat to disengage from the pedal? You'll scratch the sole of the shoe, and possibly slightly widen the screw holes in the shoe, but it shouldn't break anything. Note that it's quite hard to get a shoe & cleat ...


0

EDIT: I misunderstood your situation hence my original answer. In the case that your shoe is still stuck to the cleat, remove the pedal from the bike first. Keeping the pedal on the bike will just restrict your motion as the crank arm and frame will get the in way. Put the pedal in a vice grip or between two solid objects which allow you to keep the pedal ...


0

I had a (improperly tightened) bolt drop out of a SPD cleat while riding which left me in the same predicament (also ended up eating asphalt), I ended up being able to wedge my shoe against the frame to get the appropriate leverage to kick the shoe/cleat combo out of the pedal. I would try attaching the pedal to a bike (and foot in shoe) and attempting the ...


5

A lot of causal riders appear to prefer SPD's, which is a great place to start, but I here is the argument for SPD-SL like systems. Which I personally prefer and even on dirty muddy roads. Road bike specific pedals (e.g., SPD-SL) are designed for a single purpose, road cycling, and the pedals do this job well. Road cycling has a lot of repetitive motions ...


4

First, note that if you're new to clip/clipless systems, it takes a while to get used to it. A lot of non-racers prefer mountain bike clipless pedals (e.g. Shimano SPD) since you can clip in on both sides of the pedal and the shoes often allow the cleats to be recessed (so you can walk around). Mountain marketed shoes generally tend to be more comfortable ...


1

First let's think why this occured. I believe this is what would happen if one used the left pedal for the right crank and the right pedal for the left crank arm. You see the pedals are made so they screw in with the same rotation as the pedal spins (on forward motion of course). So as you press the pedal the pedal, even if not screwed in correctly, it ...


3

The threads are completely stuffed. Do not just screw the pedals back in and do not rely on loctite or similar compounds. Pedals falling off is at best inconvenient, at worst can lead to crash and serious injury. Easiest option is to replace the cranks. Its not a big job but parts cost might mean a repair is a better option for you. The bottom bracket will ...


2

The only thing you can do that is safe and reliable and sane is to get a new crankset. You'd need a helicoil or something similar to do the repair reliably and this would be less strong than a new crankset and cost more than the new crankset + installation. Next time, make sure everything is greased and tightened properly.


0

Those cranks arms are gone/dead and need to be replaced. The pedals are steel and the crank aluminum. You should grease the threads so the metals do not fuse.



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