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7

1. Arguably, just the time it takes you to get from point A to point B is a perfectly good measurement of improvement (same with average speed) As you say, wind influences this, as does countless other factors - traffic lights, weather (wind, wet roads, snow and ice, etc..) However, unless you are remarkably lucky or remarkably unlucky, these variables ...


6

Garmin Edge 500. It's small, light, and works with ANT+ devices. For a full review see Ray Maker's blog: http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2009/11/garmin-edge-500-in-depth-review.html I've had mine since March, and I've recently coupled it with a Powertap PRO+ power meter. The combination is a bit pricey though, but there are two great things that you get from ...


6

Polar's higher end heart rate monitors now offer a foot pod for tracking running distance and a bike computer (wireless as well). The data can be downloaded via the data link. Again, like ttt notes, not inexpensive. But then this level of functionality is alas, never cheap. I recall there was a Palm Pilot app that had an interface to some common bike ...


6

I've used SportyPal also. Works pretty good. You also might want to check out MapMyRide. They have a Blackberry and iPhone app to track your route. Personally I find the only problems with using my cell phone as a GPS device is that the battery drains really fast, and also that the reception isn't that great. SportyPal and MapMyRide both support GPX ...


5

In short no. You're actually better off measuring power, through a powertap, SRM or similar ergometer. This gives you a measure of your physical performance that is absolute. So your speed is a factor of your power output, chain efficiency, wind resistance, drag, tyre performance, road surface, atmospheric pressure, and gradient. It is almost impossible to ...


5

Speedometer = device which measures speed. Odometer = device which measures distance traveled. Cycle computers can normally do both (plus many other features you may or may not need). Are they absolutely necessary for cycling? No, but they can be quite helpful in many cases. When riding long distances (e.g. touring, randonneuring), it's often important ...


4

I use my speedo/odo for training purposes. It has a cadence sensor, so I can keep my cadence at 90rpm. It has a lap timer, so I can track my pace on the 5k loop I ride on. It accumulates mileage, so I have a sense of my weekly distance. The fancy ones have wireless sensors so you don't need to route wires, built in GPS, a heart monitor, a computer ...


4

I can think of two possible reasons why you might want to use an odometer/speedometer. (Note: sometimes it is also called a cyclometer.) A. Tracking fitness/training goals (especially if you are into racing). If you want to compete in an endurance race, you will want to prepare for it by conditioning yourself to cycle consistently at a sustained speed for ...


4

Running Ahead http://www.runningahead.com Free You can track your running, cycling and other workouts. No advertisement at all. Very clean interface. You can customize your home page and reports Many charts and reports on your workout data Supports the import of GPS data directly from the GPS. (Depends on the model that you've got) Supports the import of ...


4

If you don't mind wearing something on your wrist, the Garmin Forerunners are great. You can keep all of your workouts online at Garmin Connect. They are a little pricy. There are a few models and can run you anywhere from $150 - $400. I actually have the one pictured here. I use it for running and it's the cheapest model (also the oldest). I have to ...


3

I'm currently developing GPSLog Labs to do just that. I'm a keen cyclist and built the site to track my rides and training that I record on a simple GPS logger. You can also use your Nokia or any of the many Android and iPhone apps that let you export GPX files. It's got zillions of features and stats and does smart processing of the resulting logs to help ...


3

I like SportyPal myself. Several platforms are supported (iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, etc) and there is a free version that does the necessities. It also does a good job of displaying your results online. This is a great choice if you don't want to buy a separate GPS/Bike computer, but you might find it lacking if you want the features from a dedicated ...


3

There are many apps available for iOS and Android. Some of the big names: Strava EndoMondo Runkeeper MapMyRide Sports Tracker They all have a mobile application that tracks your ride and then uploads it to a central server, accessible via a website. The website often provides reports and breakdowns of your performance. They also add elevation data, but ...


2

Here are a few apps that should be able to use open street map and record GPS tracks: Simple OSM http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/simple-osm/9710865b-2c38-e011-854c-00237de2db9e GPX Travel Map http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/gpx-travel-map/13a79a34-c283-4f5c-b3fb-4d02e3f4f43a Navi Computer ...


2

Windows Phones + Open street map I know strava requires installation of the googlemaps app to function, but they don't make anything for windows. If you want to use their service of comparing against different users, you can upload data from another app as long as its the right format (which should be possible with any of those open street map apps for ...


2

Depending on where you live, wind can be highly unpredictable and fickle. I use Google weather (google for "wind speed" and then click on "wind"; n.b. this apparently won't work in some mobile browsers) to get a rough idea of what the winds are going to be like for the day. However, I have found that even this can be horribly inaccurate if you ride any ...


2

iBike is a power meter that uses the same thinking as yours. Instead of measuring forces produces by your legs, it calculates power based on speed, gradient and wind resistance. So what you get is power measurements that has wind resistance factored in as you want, plus gravity and other resistance. see http://ibikesports.com/how_iBike_works.html Compared ...


2

I generally use a Garmin Edge 305 which hooks up reasonably well to the computer (Mac or PC). But I also use the RunKeeper app for the iPhone which syncs to their website. And if you're an Android-ist, here's a recent post offering options (disclaimer, not my post, I just subscribe to the feed).


1

Continental makes a version of the Mountain King (Mountain King 2.2 Protection) with a higher TPI and their ProTection anti-puncture system. I would recommend spending the extra cash on the Mountain King's with this feature. Alternatively, you could pick up some Tuffy Liners to add a layer of protection to your existing tires.


1

From what I can see here: http://www.conti-online.com/generator/www/de/en/continental/bicycle/general/innovation/Protection_en.html ...you are going to have an excellent tire. These tight-fabric protection (kevlar or aramid, I guess) work great (at least are working great in my Marathon XR). For XC and off-road, I think the tight fabric might be preferred ...


1

The Sigma ROX 9 - It has every feature you could ask for from cycling computer, except the turn by turn directions of a Garmin Edge 800. Including a dock to connect to your PC and Training log software. It's also roughly half the cost of the Garmin Edge 500, and 70% less than the Edge 800, in my area at least. Includes Heart Rate, as well


1

I use a RunKeeper app for my phone (available for both iPhone & Android devices). It's really good and their site is pretty neat too. It does full GPS tracking (for free) and you can manually create routes and enter activities (despite the name it isn't just for running, in fact I even use it for open water swimming).



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