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7

I'd recommend a Cyclocross bike (also called CX). That's a robust road bike frame, configured to accept tyres up to about 40mm wide. You won't need 40mm unless you're doing proper off-roading, but a nice 30-35mm file tread such as a Specialized Trigger or Schwalbe Sammy Slick will run nicely on smooth pavement, will handle cobbles and bad pavement, and ...


6

The short answer is that it is purely down to your individual training level and mechanical efficiency in each of these disciplines. Bonking is a result of fully depleting your glycogen stores. Once this occurs, your body's only source of fuel to power your exercise is to metabolise fat. This does not change regardless of what activity you are performing. ...


4

We don't do product recommendations here. Generally speaking, a road bike will be faster than a MTB for the same rider. That said, road bikes are less robust. I've popped road tyres on potholes that a rigid MTB would barely notice. Tyre width won't change the frontal area of the bike by much if anything. Instead, the wider tyre allows use of a lower ...


4

The Science behind bonking This is a really interesting article applied to running but no doubt the same applies to cycling. The interesting quotes being "It is impossible to prove that muscle glycogen depletion alone limits prolonged exercise performance," and "the inseparable relationship between our head and our legs" And this highlights that glycogen ...


1

The roadie will probably be faster. The mountain bike will not even be a mountain bike. At your price range: Tyre rolling resistance, both bikes will probably have crappy tyres, it is likely, but not certain, that the road bike will have less rolling resistance. Weight of the bike, the MTB will be at least 3 kilos heavier, this is a plus on descents, ...



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