Hot answers tagged

9

First things first: A belt is probably slightly less efficient than a properly installed clean chain. The test you link already indicates that. Probably with the tension Gates requires you'll loose a bit more power. On to your question: The chain is 200 grams heavier than the belt, of course with the chain you get gears, which you don't get with a belt ...


9

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


7

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


7

Not easily. V-brake levers pull twice as much cable as a calliper brake levers, so you'll not be able to swap them without swapping the levers too, and these are often attached to the shifters, so you'd end up swapping an awful lot of parts. Additionally V-brakes are mounted to a pair of bosses on the seat stays & fork legs whilst calliper brakes are ...


7

I'd recommend a Cyclocross bike (also called CX). That's a robust road bike frame, configured to accept tyres up to about 40mm wide. You won't need 40mm unless you're doing proper off-roading, but a nice 30-35mm file tread such as a Specialized Trigger or Schwalbe Sammy Slick will run nicely on smooth pavement, will handle cobbles and bad pavement, and ...


6

The short answer is that it is purely down to your individual training level and mechanical efficiency in each of these disciplines. Bonking is a result of fully depleting your glycogen stores. Once this occurs, your body's only source of fuel to power your exercise is to metabolise fat. This does not change regardless of what activity you are performing. ...


5

The optimum pressure for any kind of bike is going to depend on a lot more factors than just the type of bike. You have to look at many other things such as rider weight, terrain, and tire size. It also depends on how you qualify something as optimum. Higher pressures might be optimum in some situations, but may not be very comfortable to the rider, making ...


4

We don't do product recommendations here. Generally speaking, a road bike will be faster than a MTB for the same rider. That said, road bikes are less robust. I've popped road tyres on potholes that a rigid MTB would barely notice. Tyre width won't change the frontal area of the bike by much if anything. Instead, the wider tyre allows use of a lower ...


4

The Science behind bonking This is a really interesting article applied to running but no doubt the same applies to cycling. The interesting quotes being "It is impossible to prove that muscle glycogen depletion alone limits prolonged exercise performance," and "the inseparable relationship between our head and our legs" And this highlights that glycogen ...


2

Whether your numbers are descent depend on who will answer. I've never riden road so I find those numbers descent, but some people who ride road may tell you that those numbers are mediocre. If you want to find out how you compare against others (and your self) in parts of that ride I suggest that you start using strava. Used wiselly it's a great tool for ...


2

Surprised there are not more studies on efficiency of clipless. The original question was to seek a scientific answer, not anecdotal, although many feel clipless gives more, this is subjective if not backed by science. This is the only article I found: ...


2

Define performance? Top speed, efficiency, handling? If you lower the bar you will be more inclined with less frontal area Unless you have some really strange air flow you will have less aerodynamic drag Drag = CD x Area x Velocity x Velocity CD is the drag coefficient and it can also change with position but it should be pretty constant Because of ...


2

If you are looking for pedalling performance, adjusting the seatpost (up and down) and the seat (back and front) is the answer. There are literature about adjusting seatpost so you can look them up on the internet; youtube also have many video demonstration. Adjusting handlebar height is more about efficiency. In general: the less up-right position, the ...


2

You can lower the bar first by flipping the stem. Judging from the angle of your stem it will lower the bar by at least 5-7cm (2-3 inches). Which is already a good start The next step would be to migrate the 2 spacers from below the stem to the top. With two spacers on top it might look a bit awkward but there is no technical argument against doing it. So ...


1

The roadie will probably be faster. The mountain bike will not even be a mountain bike. At your price range: Tyre rolling resistance, both bikes will probably have crappy tyres, it is likely, but not certain, that the road bike will have less rolling resistance. Weight of the bike, the MTB will be at least 3 kilos heavier, this is a plus on descents, ...


1

Typical BMX brakes are u brakes and require 990 posts. Road bikes don't have these posts (nor do mountain bikes or hybrids). If you can't see the posts look at the position of the posts. U brake posts are above the rim. Cantilever posts (your v bakes) are below the rim. V brakes can stop you. You might need better brakes or better pads but I bet that some ...


1

I have a trailer for my bicycle... Without the trailer I average 19 mph. The difference between adding the third wheel and 20~40 lbs is about 2~5 mph. Just keep everything lubed and tuned. Also steel frames are more springy/comfortable than aluminium as they absorb more of the bumps etc in the road. The biggest difference is in the rims. Spinning the rims ...


1

Air pressre in your tyres is very significant in terms of performance; in case of slick tyres it's even more important than width. However it's impossible to arbitrally put any value of tyre pressure as perfect for a given bike. The tyre pressure adjustments can depend on: wheel size - smaller wheels need higher pressure because the overall volume of tyres ...



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