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Lowering the center of gravity by having weight on the outside pedal helps with stability, as well as sitting back over the rear wheel to increase breaking grip in the rear wheel. As such it is not wise to brake during the arc of the corner from my experience as you are more likely to lose traction.


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I personally have suffered two front-wheel slide-outs, one on the road and one on a dry singletrack. Here's the road one: Having more weight on your front wheel will temporarily increase the size of the contact patch. If your bike+rider is 200 pounds, and your tyre/tire pressure is 100 PSI, then each tyre is supporting ...


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I am speaking from far more MTB experience than road, but road is similar. Front wheel slide tends to be is more severe than rear, in terms of recover or non-recover outcome. Novices instinctively shy away from the front, sit upright and lean back when things get tight, unloading the front wheel and inducing a front wheel slide - the worst thing to do. ...


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He is right. 1) in cycling, weight is distributed more on the rear wheel (70 rear-30front approx.). So even assume that both wheel is at the same leaning angle, the front would lose traction first (friction proportional to reaction force). This is because the front wheel has less 'grip' limit than the rear wheel. 2) When rider starts to corner/or correct ...


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This is exactly how mountain bikers achieve greater "stickiness" in sharp turns. Unweighting briefly just before a turn, then loading through the turn can increase traction briefly since there is more downward force on the wheel. Dynamically moving your weight to achieve greater performance is a much overlooked aspect of cycling. It's less useful in ...



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