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In almost every slope you will hit a speed "sweet spot" where the gravity pull and drag from the wind will cancel each other out, this can be at 70 km/h for a 8% slope in aero position or 15 km/h for a 2% slope on an hybrid bike.


6

You are going at constant speed when the driving force from gravity Fg is equal to the drag (air resistance) Fd plus friction (rolling resistance) Ff: Fg = Fd + Ff When coasting down a hill, the driving force is the component of the gravitational force parallel to the road: Fg = m g sin(a) Here, a is the slope (angle with the horizontal), m is the mass ...


1

Newtons second Law: F=ma where m is your mass (including everything, bicycle, luggage), a is acceleration. you look for solutions with a=0 here force F consists of: gravity: m* g* cos(α), g is gravitational acceleration, earth average: g=9.81m/s², α is the angle between path and vertical. air drag: ρ/2*c *A * v² where ρ is air density, c drag ...


4

Drag increases with speed. Drag is both rolling resistance and wind resistance. A steeper slope is more gravitational pull. Terminal velocity is when the gravitational pull equals the drag. On a mild slope it will be only a few miles an hour. On a very steep slope it might be over 50 mph. A 7% slope is around 20 mph on road bike on a road.



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