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9

You can do it, because your bike is connected to the ground. The work done when moving an object is proportional to distance and resistance force (which consists of air resistance and rolling resistance for bikes). The air resistance depends on air speed (ground speed + wind speed), but distance depends only on ground speed. Going slower reduces the energy ...


8

You can do this because of the gearing of the bike. When you're riding at a slower ground speed, if you shift to a lower gear to keep your pedal RPM the same, then the same force on the pedals produces a higher thrust at the tire. Even if you do not shift, it is easier to produce higher force on the pedals at lower RPM. The strength of a cyclist is ...


2

Partly it's due to the way that wind speed is measured. The standard for wind speed is to measure it 10 metres above ground level. Closer to the ground, an effect called the boundary effect kicks in and the wind speed is slower (in fact, the wind speed on the ground is effectively zero). According to this site, wind speed on a flat grassy plain can be ...


1

I have a degree in chemical engineering and we study this not just in pipe flow but in a fluidized catalytic bed and when you will lose catalyst out the chimney. In my chemical engineering studies we have never treated particle speed versus wind speed differently. According to Galilean invariance you should get the same wind resistance in any frame of ...


0

I assume your question is 'How is it possible that I can still riding upright, even though the headwind is greater than my maximum riding speed?' The answer is: The gust/wind is not always in constant direction, and certainly is not a constant flow (speed). So the average headwind speed is less than you would assume. This is especially true when you are ...



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