Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

It's more or less a math question. A way from Athen to London without using a ferry if not absolutely necessary (Canal), it is approximately 3200 kilometers. So if you have an average speed of 15 km/h (mountainbike) or maybe 25 km/h (racing bicycle) it would take approximately 214 respectively 128 hours to cycle the route. As always for such rough ...


19

Get a printed map and look for the 'postal roads'... There are 'postal roads' in Switzerland that are closed to normal cars. These go over some high passes that are just not wide enough for regular traffic. They are called 'postal roads' because only the post bus goes on them. What is amazing about them is the descents - you can ride 'TdF' style without ...


12

I took a pretty quick look at the map, but I'm going to make a kind of general suggestion: If this is a trip that you're only used to traveling by motor vehicle, you might fall into the trap of thinking that the route you're used to is the only route available. Bikes can go lots of places that cars can't, and lots of places that cars just as frequently ...


9

I have actually commuted in a very dangerous, hilly, bike un-friendly city (Tegucigalpa, Honduras). Here there are zero facilities for bike commuters, no racks on public transport, no bike parking anywhere and of course, no showers at workplace. I have tackled the problem with following strategies: Leave home with plenty of extra time. When you travel to ...


7

Give yourself a week to follow the Loire down to the Alps, a couple of weeks to cruise around lake Geneva, through Interlaken, Liechtenstein (to add an extra country to the bedpost), Graz, Vienna and on to Budaspest. Remember that it is one Alp a day unless you are a TdF rider, so be prepared for some astoundingly steep climbs and low mileages if you go the ...


6

Google maps tries to do this in biking mode to begin with: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/03/biking-directions-added-to-google-maps.html Mapquest is also hill aware to some extent: http://blog.mapquest.com/2011/04/21/cycle-route-planner-aerial-languages/ (I have tried this, but I don't think its particularly great. But I haven't tried it in SF). ...


6

That is a reasonable estimate, however there is more to it than that. First of all, you are not going to be cycling the way you would drive, i.e. on the Interstate. For your particular plan you are most likely to be wanting to follow Highway 1 up the coast. This road is bicycle friendly whereas the Interstate is not. This comes at a price - more miles and ...


6

You could use ridewithgps to build your map. It allows you to drag waypoints off the main route and re-routes (can be used without auto routing as well if you prefer). You'll have to pay if you want to print from their site. However, you can print a cue sheet free or export the saved map in GPX or TCX format to print with another application or website ...


5

The biggest hurdle as I see is the heat. Perhaps you can pack a change of clothes and some wet wipes and a stick of deodorant to change and freshen up. In terms of route it looks like you can avoid the highway by heading south. The bike track near the river looks like it could have some routes through on your bike that may not be accessible to cars. Same ...


5

Roflcopter already tackled the actual route planning more completely than I ever could. I thought I'd add a bit about the time you can expect to take. This depends mainly on the following: The amount of cycling you do in regular life Regardless of how fit you are, your body needs to adjust to the cycling if you are not a regular cyclist. Plan trips of ...


4

Unfortunately, there is single answer to this question. In my experience, every route is unique, and will have variables that increase or decrease the transit time for a particular commute. Traffic, seasonal weather, time of day for the commute, rider's fitness, and bicycle condition will all play a role in determining the time for a given route. If you ...


4

http://ridewithgps.com is the tool my local bike club uses. It doesn't plan routes for you, but had several overlays including Google's bike routes and topo maps. As you plot your route the graph at the bottom shows the altitude and grade. I live in Seattle and find that Ride With GPS works great for finding reasonable routes through the hills.


4

You can get an elevation profile of a route from using Google Maps and GPS Visualiser, as detailed on Aaron James Young's blog. In summary: Create your route on Google Maps. Grab the link, and stick it into GPS Visualiser. Bingo! An elevation profile chart is created showing how the altitude changes over the route.


4

They do not have an app, but I typically use the Course Creator on http://bikeroutetoaster.com/ to plan new rides. It gives you elevation profile and will allow you to print the cue sheets. You can export the GPX/TCX data to upload to a GPS device for on screen turn by turn cues (depending on your device). Another good option for finding new routes is to ...


3

Route choice aside, take the miles, throw away the hours, other than as a crude comparison tool. Examine the route profile (however you can manage) and try to classify what part of the route is flat, climbing, congested, etc. Use your personal performance in prior long rides to judge speed for each type, and do the division. Keep in mind that, on an ...


3

Just very generally speaking: First survey your route for "choke points" -- places like river crossings where you're forced to choose between a limited number of pathways. Pick an overall route that selects the best routes through the choke points. Observe other cyclists, and observe traffic at your likely commute time, and select routes between choke ...


3

It's a year later, but you haven't yet accepted an answer, so this is how I would approach it. Keep in mind that I love bicycling on the road and think bicycling on the Interstate system is a fun and exciting pastime... After looking at your map and spending a little quality time with Street View, my first choice would be the obvious highway route, at least ...


2

It's scary, for me at least, because the destination is at some big highway with trucks and everything racing at +80 km/h The destination is "Bosques del Poniente". The approach from the north east crosses the "Monterrey-Saltillo" highway. To avoid that, approach from the south: for example via "Robles" and "Benito Juarez". Continuing to work ...


2

If 54D is the highway it looks like you can take a route like this to get around it. I have commuted without a shower at my destination and found that as long as I shower before I leave it usually would be OK. Just kept deodorant at the office, and changed in a bathroom stall. You'll be a bit sweaty early on but it dies down. The wet wipes are a good ...


2

In terms of that specific journey, 1 day 19 hours is 43 hours and if you cycled 8 hours a day then obviously that's going to be five or six days. The key is that there's no one-size-fits-all answer. Touring cycling is all about the journey, less about the destination. Sure you could work out likely average speeds, but then you need to think about lunch? ...


2

Cycling speeds do vary greatly, and I'd advise to remember your average long-distance speed from a day of cycling and cut away a third to take the many unknowns and saddle soreness into account. When I cycle for half a day, for example, I usually average 15-20 kilometres an hour, so I'd expect 10-15 kilometres an hour or 100 kilometres per day for longer ...


2

In the US I bought bicycle touring specific maps from Adventure Cycling Association. They're on the expensive side (I just paid about $50 for ~1,000 miles worth of maps), but I like knowing that someone has personally tested each route by bike and that food stops, bike shops and that sort of thing are marked. I've met plenty of tourists who used GPS, road ...


2

Yes. On Google maps you can plan a route. The Google earth picture will also give you almost a 3-dimensional view. If you use the Ctrl+C button and copy the link from Google maps of your profile (it looks like a chain in the box that appears to the left of the map). Then do a google search and type in 'GPS Visualizer'. It is (currently) a free program that ...


2

Correct me if I'm wrong, but Google Maps ALREADY allows for point insertion, by means of "breaking" one segment in two. Instead of using the navigation directions, click the "My places" button in the sidebar, then "Create Map". The drawing tools appear on the map: While editing a path, if you hover over a segment, the midpoints of each segment appear as ...


1

Also consider Co-Rider ( https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/co-rider/id538095358?mt=8). I have used it for turn-by-turn successfully and it does allow for GPX import although I can't confirm that you'll find both features working together. Good luck.


1

Does it strictly have to be a web application? If not, with Google Earth you can simply hover your mouse over a location and it will display the altitude of that location at the bottom of your screen, which would let you subtract the 2 altitudes from each other to get the vertical difference between the 2 points. You can download Google Earth here.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible