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46

Rank, Folke and Jespersen (2001), "Differences in cyclists and car drivers exposure to air pollution from traffic in the city of Copenhagen", The Science of The Total Environment, 279:131-136 teams of two cyclists and two car drivers in two cars were equipped with personal air samplers while driving for 4 hours on 2 different days in the morning traffic ...


23

Exposure while cycling is generally no worse than being in a vehicle. In fact can be better depending on the weather and the amount of solvents in the plastic of your car. You do experience more when cycling heavily - simply because you breath more - but general medical evidence is that the benefits of increased fitness greatly outweigh any problems. The ...


17

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920084/ - "On average, the estimated health benefits of cycling were substantially larger than the risks relative to car driving for individuals shifting their mode of transport." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22124913 - "We estimate that beneficial effects of increased physical activity are substantially ...


10

Ways to reduce your exposure include: riding on bike paths and secondary streets riding at off-peak times (when traffic is low) riding when commercial traffic (e.g. diesel-consuming trucks) is lower riding before the sun gets high or after it begins to go down: ozone is produced by sunlight and takes time to develop (see image below from Chapter 6) ...


7

This issue was highlighted on the BBC News website Cyclists are 'unaware of the risks from pollution' in an article aimed at raising awareness in cyclist of the short and long term effects of air pollution. The article makes for a good read. A brief summary, Primarily pollution cause the cyclist’s airways to become inflamed and therefore narrow, trigger ...


6

Today, the major part of city masks were made to avoid breathing dust as @mgb said, you need more than a simple mask to stop micro particles. Anyway try http://www.u2sportmask.com/ (for example).


6

To answer this question (which is different from asking "Which mask?") you have to define what "pollution" means and then examine the available masks to see if they do anything to reduce it. Just offhand, I believe that "pollution", in an urban traffic setting, consists of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide (and various other sulfur compounds), ...


6

I get this question once in a while (working in Danish Cyclist Federation). It seems to be based on the idea that commuting by bike will expose you to more pollution than commuting by car. I have seen no research that proves this. However, I have seen research indicating that the opposite might be true. Some was in danish, but here's some in english and ...


5

You have a few options. One that has been marketed to cyclists has been the totobo mask which is from what I gather a re-usable N95 mask (although uncertified by any agency) with replaceable filter peices. It's cheap to try, at only $25 or so. The Respro is another option. It seems like a bit more customizable, and looks like the neoprene would ...


4

I used a combination of a Respro Techno Anti-Pollution Mask and some Decathlon clear glasses like the ones Narcis Calvet suggests. I found that in the winter breathing out through the mask caused breath to leak out of the top of the mask and condense on the glasses, which was most annoying when standing still at the traffic lights.The pollution mask I found ...


4

I ride a bike almost everyday not in very clean city - Kharkov, UA. And had similar problem as you have. My decision was: breathe in by nose, breathe out by mouth. It's easier than doing this by nose only, and safer for lungs when breathe just by mouth. I'll explain: Mouth is not very good defended from a polluted air. But in nose we have small hairs that ...


3

The only ones I know of are made by Respro, like this, but I'm sure other brands are available. Summary: yes, cycling-specific ones do exist. Searching turns up some discussion, blogs, forums and user reviews in online cycling shops. However, this is all anecdotal, and it isn't clear: how useful they are this will depend quite particularly on your ...


2

There is really nothing you can do. Anti-pollution masks are mostly placebo, and beside making breathing harder, they have close to zero efficiency in terms of air filtering. Military gas mask would do the job, but for obvious reasons it is not appropriate for biking.


2

I've worn the respro in Beijing for about a year where the air pollution apparently causes lung cancer. Of course, that is a long term effect that is hard to measure immediately, but I can say that the air smells much cleaner and I "feel" better after riding through traffic with the mask on as opposed to without it. Your face gets a bit sweaty, but it can be ...


2

Trials on the N95 concluded that it didn't really do a good job filtering chemical pollution. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN74390617 and the results: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23013369


2

Along similar lines as @Murph suggests cyclists are often less affected than vehicle passengers because the air intakes on most cars are placed lower to the ground than most cyclists' noses (recumbent riders take note ...). Many of the nasties, particularly particulate matter, sink and aren't at the higher levels. Personally I've always struggled to breath ...


2

Interestingly, there was a point where studies (too long ago for me to even begin to remember sources) suggested that cyclists were probably less affected by pollution because, as a consequence of the regular exercise they were taking, their lungs were more efficient and so needed less air (and hence pollutants) to get the same oxygen. This was perhaps ...


1

Seems like the conclusions from the reports posted for this question range from "it's not a concern" to "it will kill you." Here's my two cents on short-term effects:I live in a fairly polluted city (22nd in the US this year, I believe) and my experience is that anything above what is considered "moderate" ozone levels (0.060 to 0.075 ppm, source links ...



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