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21

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


7

They do help with training and racing but they are also very expensive. As you say you are a beginner I imagine increases in fitness/strength (and therefore speed) are going to come fast anyway, even without a power readout to base training around. I would definitely invest in a HRM though and make sure the bike computer you use has cadence as well as ...


6

From what I've read, adding a power meter betters measuring HR only, for some reasons: Heat, diet and stress can affect your HR. A low HR might be an indicator that you are in good shape. You can have a high HR and your power output be low An increase in power implies better performance, but an increase in HR does not necessarily. So it is good to combine ...


6

We cannot know exactly unless Dowsett's team releases it, but we can make a reasonable estimate. The most important unknown is Dowsett's drag area, or CdA, so below I have calculated the power needed to average 52.937 km/h for various values of CdA, given the assumptions noted on the figure. Notably, rho is air density in the velodrome and a trackside ...


4

Yes, you can install a Type S - Rotor 3D24 on your Synapse using the following adapter: https://www.c-bear.com/en/products/bb30a-cannondale-synapse You also have the option of Type S - FSA MegaExo (Gossamer or K-Force Light) and Type S - FSA BB386EVO (Gossamer or K-Force Light). Please have a look at the following chart from FSA: ...


4

Power output by itself is not a good measurement of performance. Performance of 300W for a 130Kg rider compared to a 80Kg rider is completely different. You should be looking at a combination of Power to weight ratio Time to complete a regular route/segment on garmin connect/strava. Heart rate How you actually feel during your cycle How well your bike ...


3

The faster you're going the more power you get out of a given amount of force or "push". Ad bsdl says, power = force times speed, so the same force at a higher speed requires or provides more power. Going slowly up a hill even quite a strong push doesn't cost much power. A 200W "push" at 10kph will take you up most road hills with little to no pedalling, ...


3

Of course gear ratio affects the "potential" power that you can produce. Consider a maximum muscular effort to go up a steep hill. Neglecting chain friction and other secondary effects, you’ll go up the hill the fastest at the highest power that your muscles can produce. Note that power = k x torque x cadence (where k is a just a constant that determines ...


3

To be honest, you're really asking this question too late. If you had asked before your tour, I believe the easiest way you could have measured it would be to find a cycling app which takes your weight and your other physical information. Then you simply weigh your fully loaded bike and add that weight to your own, then the app would measure your total ...


2

BB90 accepts the same axle as a standard outboard BB - 24mm crank axle. I think there are two options.. Stages make a power meter that they list as compatible with Force and Rival groupsets. For a BB90, I think it would be the GXP option you're looking for. I would compare the axle/crank spline before buying it though as I'm unsure what the CX1 spline ...


2

There are several factors involved here, so any answer is not simple. First, as Leon noted, you get zero power to the wheels when the gear is so hard that you can't move. And you get vanishingly small power to the wheels when the gear ratio is so easy that you're spinning at 200 RPM. But more importantly, AVERAGE power over a period of time is highly ...


2

You can't. Calories burnt depends on your speed, elevation change, and your body composition. e.g. riding at 30mph burns more than double the calories per hour than 20mph. The calorie calculators just make a rough approximation, and their margin of error is significantly greater than the difference between their assumed bike weight and yours. Just take ...


2

As others has said P = F X V Lets say it felt 10 KG - under the force of gravity that is 98 newtons - lets just round up to to 100 N Let say you were doing 15 kmh 100 N 15 km/h * 1 h/3600 sec * 1000/1k = 100 * 15 / 3.6 = 41.67 watts If if felt like about 10 KG and you were doing 15 kmh then about 40 watts Something like Gruber power assist is ...


1

I had a 400W motor for a while, and that felt like a good solid continuous shove. Given the other rider is also going up the same hill, they have to keep powering themselves too, so anything they give you is in addition to what they need to keep pace. It doesn't take a lot though - a push can be enough to take the edge off your muscles for a moment. So ...


1

Interesting topic as I just got a DA 7900 Stages and I'm looking to pair it up with a FC-RS500 crankset as well. Stages say that all Shimano non-drive side crankarms can be mix matched with any Hollowgram II so long it is a Road crankset and not mixed with MTBs (one source say from Tiagra to Dura-Ace and others include Sora). I guess the confusion comes in ...


1

Many individuals are running non matching hollowtech II stages crank arms with no ill effects. Stages themselves cites this as OK. Note the Dura-Ace crank below. Crank Compatibility: All Shimano Hollowtech II road cranks Go ahead and purchase with confidence and enjoy cycling with power. I run an Ultegra 6800 Stages on a 6700 Crankset personally.


1

Power2Max say: Changing cranks or chain rings does not affect calibration. You can also use oval chain rings (e.g., Rotor Q-Rings, Osymetric, etc). Please note: compact (110 mm) aero chain rings (such as Rotor aero Q Rings) are not compatible with power2max Classic, but are compatible with Type S. So, yes. That said, does it really matter all that ...


1

According to Canyon, it would be approximately 400 watts average. Since an hour record attempt requires that there be no computer on the bike to be official, a more accurate measurement is unlikely to be available.



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