Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


6

From what I've read, adding a power meter betters measuring HR only, for some reasons: Heat, diet and stress can affect your HR. A low HR might be an indicator that you are in good shape. You can have a high HR and your power output be low An increase in power implies better performance, but an increase in HR does not necessarily. So it is good to combine ...


6

They do help with training and racing but they are also very expensive. As you say you are a beginner I imagine increases in fitness/strength (and therefore speed) are going to come fast anyway, even without a power readout to base training around. I would definitely invest in a HRM though and make sure the bike computer you use has cadence as well as ...


6

Mountain bikers regularly run these low cadences for very short periods, often at much higher power output. The issue as to causing damage to knees is more about the duration of the climb and how strong your stabiliser muscles are. (Too much time mushing causes chronic overuse problems, while weak stabiliser muscles can allow injury to happen), however they ...


6

Aside from pacing better, if your cadence drops to 40rpm for too long and you are in your lowest gear at maximal effort for the expected duration, then you could probably use at least a gear 2/3rds or less than you currently have so you are likely to be able to sustain closer to 60rpm. That's possibly not feasible on your bike, but perhaps a 29 rear cog at ...


5

The short and most direct answer to your question is to use your power meter to pace your ride optimally and Alex Simmons, who has given another answer to your question, was too modest to mention that he is an expert in this and has developed one of the most sophisticated power pacing models for variable conditions. A longer answer is, to paraphrase Prof. ...


5

We cannot know exactly unless Dowsett's team releases it, but we can make a reasonable estimate. The most important unknown is Dowsett's drag area, or CdA, so below I have calculated the power needed to average 52.937 km/h for various values of CdA, given the assumptions noted on the figure. Notably, rho is air density in the velodrome and a trackside ...


4

The raw pedal force or torque data are difficult to work with but you can extract some information from them. First, note that Stages mounts the strain gages (or gauges) permanently to the crank, so the crank length is constant and they know what it is; that means that there is a one-to-one relationship between the kgf and torque columns. In this case, it ...


3

Background If you have the resources (motor scooter and someone experience in how to do it) and time, motor pacing could be very good training tool for building high-end power for a variety of fitness levels. Where it excels (when done properly) is getting riders to train at their lactic threshold. Motor pacing will push you to levels that are hard to ...


3

Bad data, no question whatsoever. Muscle fatigue develops quite rapidly, but even so there is minimal decrease in power for at least a handful of seconds. (Indeed, even the fitted curve you've shown seems to be in error, likely as a result of the way GC's fitting algorithm will chase "noise".)


3

TL;DR Your output should be consistent regardless of what type of terrain you're riding on, but external factors coupled can skew the results. I've trained with power for many years, and while my evidence to the following points is purely empirical, maybe it will help you. In my experience, I've always achieved higher W/kg results on hills than riding ...


3

The power-speed curve of trainers are subject to variations during a ride and from ride to ride depending on various factors including: heat build up in the resistance unit and tyre tyre pressure press on force of the roller against the tyre the tyre used, and wear and tear of the unit. Some of course use a direct drive rather than a roller pressed ...


2

There are two main elements to motor pacing vs non-motor paced (solo) riding: Physiological differences Motivational/psychological differences Physiologically, there are the neuromuscular demands and the metabolic demands. The neuromuscular demands of motor paced riding are significantly different to solo riding but the metabolic demands, provided the ...


2

The short answer to your question is, no, you don't have to separate your "VO2Max power" between flat rides and climbs. However, specificity matters and the pedal force/pedal speed plots show that the demands of flat rides and steep climbs differ, so you may want to keep that, plus your recovery capacity in mind when you train. The longer answer requires ...


2

Understand that the concern is not generally things like a muscle or tendon tear that can occur with, eg, extreme weightlifting -- off-road bikers might be susceptible to that sort of injury, but not a road biker. Rather, the concern is the injury that may be done to joint surfaces and structures due to repeated force, above some "tolerable" level, applied ...


2

Your options to reduce the force on your knees are to reduce bike + rider weight or get lower gearing. If you have a standard road bike cassette, there are climbing cassettes that will reduce the gearing slightly (around 10% or so). Is it dangerous to your knees? Well, that depends on your personal physiology, how much force you are pushing, how much to you ...


2

Putting aside the crank fitting problems, you can forget about using data from a Stages power meter for reliable neuromuscular (very short duration) power assessment. It's simply not suitable for that task (not many power meters are).


2

Not a modern 105 - Claris cranksets are octalink, 105 cranksets are hollowtech.


1

Motor pacing simulates the speed/character of travelling in a big peloton in a race quite well: at times pedalling hard to keep up, alternated by periods of free-wheeling while in the draft on a downhill (say). Always moving at a high speed, fast cadence. To achieve the same on a group ride, the riders should all be quite evenly matched, ideally with some ...


1

Low cadences are generally putting a lot more strain on the knees, as you're relying on power, given the gear ratios I suspect another issue. I would work on your fitness on flatter terrain and build up to hills. Start within your cardio range and stay in it, do this regularly 3-4 times per week if possible. The problem stems from fitness/strength which ...


1

Negative force/torque power !+ actively resisting the pedal. Thus, no conclusions about pedaling "style" (even for the left leg, which is all that Stages measures) can be drawn from data such as these.


1

I agree both are measuring torque/force. That is the ratio you would get with 170 mm cranks. 1 kgf = 9.80665 newtons. 7.3 * 9.80665 * 170 / 1000 = 12.2. But without pedal angle I agree you cannot calculate work or power (wattage). And this appears to be just one pedal. stagespower-tech-specs P=2∗((Fave∗9.8∗L)∗(R∗.1047)) From there, the rest ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible