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20

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


7

They do help with training and racing but they are also very expensive. As you say you are a beginner I imagine increases in fitness/strength (and therefore speed) are going to come fast anyway, even without a power readout to base training around. I would definitely invest in a HRM though and make sure the bike computer you use has cadence as well as ...


6

From what I've read, adding a power meter betters measuring HR only, for some reasons: Heat, diet and stress can affect your HR. A low HR might be an indicator that you are in good shape. You can have a high HR and your power output be low An increase in power implies better performance, but an increase in HR does not necessarily. So it is good to combine ...


6

Aside from pacing better, if your cadence drops to 40rpm for too long and you are in your lowest gear at maximal effort for the expected duration, then you could probably use at least a gear 2/3rds or less than you currently have so you are likely to be able to sustain closer to 60rpm. That's possibly not feasible on your bike, but perhaps a 29 rear cog at ...


5

We cannot know exactly unless Dowsett's team releases it, but we can make a reasonable estimate. The most important unknown is Dowsett's drag area, or CdA, so below I have calculated the power needed to average 52.937 km/h for various values of CdA, given the assumptions noted on the figure. Notably, rho is air density in the velodrome and a trackside ...


5

The short and most direct answer to your question is to use your power meter to pace your ride optimally and Alex Simmons, who has given another answer to your question, was too modest to mention that he is an expert in this and has developed one of the most sophisticated power pacing models for variable conditions. A longer answer is, to paraphrase Prof. ...


3

Background If you have the resources (motor scooter and someone experience in how to do it) and time, motor pacing could be very good training tool for building high-end power for a variety of fitness levels. Where it excels (when done properly) is getting riders to train at their lactic threshold. Motor pacing will push you to levels that are hard to ...


3

Bad data, no question whatsoever. Muscle fatigue develops quite rapidly, but even so there is minimal decrease in power for at least a handful of seconds. (Indeed, even the fitted curve you've shown seems to be in error, likely as a result of the way GC's fitting algorithm will chase "noise".)


3

The power-speed curve of trainers are subject to variations during a ride and from ride to ride depending on various factors including: heat build up in the resistance unit and tyre tyre pressure press on force of the roller against the tyre the tyre used, and wear and tear of the unit. Some of course use a direct drive rather than a roller pressed ...


2

There are two main elements to motor pacing vs non-motor paced (solo) riding: Physiological differences Motivational/psychological differences Physiologically, there are the neuromuscular demands and the metabolic demands. The neuromuscular demands of motor paced riding are significantly different to solo riding but the metabolic demands, provided the ...


2

Putting aside the crank fitting problems, you can forget about using data from a Stages power meter for reliable neuromuscular (very short duration) power assessment. It's simply not suitable for that task (not many power meters are).


2

Not a modern 105 - Claris cranksets are octalink, 105 cranksets are hollowtech.


1

Power2Max say: Changing cranks or chain rings does not affect calibration. You can also use oval chain rings (e.g., Rotor Q-Rings, Osymetric, etc). Please note: compact (110 mm) aero chain rings (such as Rotor aero Q Rings) are not compatible with power2max Classic, but are compatible with Type S. So, yes. That said, does it really matter all that ...


1

Motor pacing simulates the speed/character of travelling in a big peloton in a race quite well: at times pedalling hard to keep up, alternated by periods of free-wheeling while in the draft on a downhill (say). Always moving at a high speed, fast cadence. To achieve the same on a group ride, the riders should all be quite evenly matched, ideally with some ...



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