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21

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


7

Generally, you attach a bike computer or a power meter to a bicycle to collect statistics, and/or some sensors to yourself. A bike computer measures the revolutions per minute of a wheel, typically by attaching a magnet to a spoke of the wheel and using a detector attached to the frame which tells the computer every time the magnet passes the detector (so ...


7

The physics model of cycling power and speed has been validated in the real world. Two examples are this and this. The model embedded in Analyticcyling.com's online calculator is based on these two papers. Whether the amount of difference calculated by the validated models is worth it to Joe and Billy is a question that can't be answered by the physics.


7

On flat terrain raw power is what is more important than Power to weight ratio. On rolling terrain P/W is important, but the larger rider still has the advantage. On mountainous terrain P/W is the determining factor. You can see this from races in pro cycling. Flat races are won by large strong riders and sprinters. Rolling races are won by mid size ...


7

They do help with training and racing but they are also very expensive. As you say you are a beginner I imagine increases in fitness/strength (and therefore speed) are going to come fast anyway, even without a power readout to base training around. I would definitely invest in a HRM though and make sure the bike computer you use has cadence as well as ...


6

From what I've read, adding a power meter betters measuring HR only, for some reasons: Heat, diet and stress can affect your HR. A low HR might be an indicator that you are in good shape. You can have a high HR and your power output be low An increase in power implies better performance, but an increase in HR does not necessarily. So it is good to combine ...


5

Power output by itself is not a good measurement of performance. Performance of 300W for a 130Kg rider compared to a 80Kg rider is completely different. You should be looking at a combination of Power to weight ratio Time to complete a regular route/segment on garmin connect/strava. Heart rate How you actually feel during your cycle How well your bike ...


4

Yes, you can install a Type S - Rotor 3D24 on your Synapse using the following adapter: https://www.c-bear.com/en/products/bb30a-cannondale-synapse You also have the option of Type S - FSA MegaExo (Gossamer or K-Force Light) and Type S - FSA BB386EVO (Gossamer or K-Force Light). Please have a look at the following chart from FSA: ...


4

To be honest, you're really asking this question too late. If you had asked before your tour, I believe the easiest way you could have measured it would be to find a cycling app which takes your weight and your other physical information. Then you simply weigh your fully loaded bike and add that weight to your own, then the app would measure your total ...


3

The faster you're going the more power you get out of a given amount of force or "push". Ad bsdl says, power = force times speed, so the same force at a higher speed requires or provides more power. Going slowly up a hill even quite a strong push doesn't cost much power. A 200W "push" at 10kph will take you up most road hills with little to no pedalling, ...


3

This largely depends on rider goals and finances. Your example clearly highlights the advantage of a light bike (although aero is probably equally important). If Joe and Billy are racing, and they are exactly the same, we can assume Billy is going to win. If Joe can afford it, and wants to stay competitive with Billy, it will likely be worth it for him. ...


3

Of course gear ratio affects the "potential" power that you can produce. Consider a maximum muscular effort to go up a steep hill. Neglecting chain friction and other secondary effects, you’ll go up the hill the fastest at the highest power that your muscles can produce. Note that power = k x torque x cadence (where k is a just a constant that determines ...


2

BB90 accepts the same axle as a standard outboard BB - 24mm crank axle. I think there are two options.. Stages make a power meter that they list as compatible with Force and Rival groupsets. For a BB90, I think it would be the GXP option you're looking for. I would compare the axle/crank spline before buying it though as I'm unsure what the CX1 spline ...


2

There are several factors involved here, so any answer is not simple. First, as Leon noted, you get zero power to the wheels when the gear is so hard that you can't move. And you get vanishingly small power to the wheels when the gear ratio is so easy that you're spinning at 200 RPM. But more importantly, AVERAGE power over a period of time is highly ...


2

You can't. Calories burnt depends on your speed, elevation change, and your body composition. e.g. riding at 30mph burns more than double the calories per hour than 20mph. The calorie calculators just make a rough approximation, and their margin of error is significantly greater than the difference between their assumed bike weight and yours. Just take ...


2

Many individuals are running non matching hollowtech II stages crank arms with no ill effects. Stages themselves cites this as OK. Note the Dura-Ace crank below. Crank Compatibility: All Shimano Hollowtech II road cranks Go ahead and purchase with confidence and enjoy cycling with power. I run an Ultegra 6800 Stages on a 6700 Crankset personally.


2

The best way to improve at riding is to ride -- but many people do have limitations on their time that make it difficult to ride as much during the week as they would like. At one end of the spectrum, there is some amount of almost all fitness-building activity that is transferable to cycling fitness. Cycling is mostly an aerobic sport, so vigorously ...


1

Increasing stamina and cadence cannot be trained at the same time. Why not try going to work on your bike instead? It will help you keep fit and it is also a logical thing to do since you do have a nice bike. Plus it will also cost you less than buying ankle weights. For that is already a win-win situation. Or if you don't want to do that. Maybe a bit of ...


1

I had a 400W motor for a while, and that felt like a good solid continuous shove. Given the other rider is also going up the same hill, they have to keep powering themselves too, so anything they give you is in addition to what they need to keep pace. It doesn't take a lot though - a push can be enough to take the edge off your muscles for a moment. So ...


1

Interesting topic as I just got a DA 7900 Stages and I'm looking to pair it up with a FC-RS500 crankset as well. Stages say that all Shimano non-drive side crankarms can be mix matched with any Hollowgram II so long it is a Road crankset and not mixed with MTBs (one source say from Tiagra to Dura-Ace and others include Sora). I guess the confusion comes in ...


1

Power2Max say: Changing cranks or chain rings does not affect calibration. You can also use oval chain rings (e.g., Rotor Q-Rings, Osymetric, etc). Please note: compact (110 mm) aero chain rings (such as Rotor aero Q Rings) are not compatible with power2max Classic, but are compatible with Type S. So, yes. That said, does it really matter all that ...



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